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  • NC.ELA.W.11-12.1 - Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics...
Example Beginner Playlist: English IV
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This doc presents an example of an intermediate-level learning plan modeled after Modern Teacher templates.  It covers 17th-century writer Jonathan Swift's "A Modest Proposal" and teaches students how to make inferences and how to recognize different kinds of satire.  Students are asked to use correct MLA parenthetical documentation to write an essay discussing Swift's message by analyzing his use of satirical devices.  This plan provides some student choice while still being pretty directive about what the students have to complete and understand to be successful.Funding for this Playlist provided by the NCDPI Digital Learning Initiative Grant.

Subject:
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
CHRISTOPHER RICE
Date Added:
06/10/2021
Example Intermediate Learning Plan: English IV
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This example of an Intermediate learning plan provides clear structure while offering the student a little bit of choice in learning activities and ways to show knowledge.  The plan concerns Jonathan Swift's "A Modest Proposal" and asks students to make inferences, recognize different types of satire, and write argumentatively while using correctly-cited material in their own writing.  Funding for this Learning Plan provided by the NCDPI Digital Learning Initiative Grant.

Subject:
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
CHRISTOPHER RICE
Date Added:
06/10/2021
Factory Life
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How do you make sense of contrasting accounts of historical events? What makes one source more reliable than another? How does corroborating information across sources help confirm or discredit historical accounts? In this lesson, students engage in such questions as they evaluate and compare different types of primary source documents with different perspectives on working conditions in English textile factories at the beginning of the 19th century.

Subject:
Social Studies
World History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Stanford History Education Group
Author:
Reading Like a Historian
Date Added:
02/26/2019
Family Ties
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In this lesson on Family Ties from Teaching Tolerance, students will critically evaluate media messages on the issue of immigration and families, illustrate a narrative, and prepare and conduct an interview and debate on how undocumented status affects the day-to-day lives of immigrant families, particularly women.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Southern Poverty Law Center
Date Added:
06/15/2017
Film Historian
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Educational Use
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In this lesson, students determine the main concept, details, stereotypes, and bias through movies. After viewing the movie, students write an essay explaining the film's influence on issues presented in the film.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Beacon Learning Center
Author:
Beacon Learning Center
Date Added:
04/23/2019
Flash Points: Searching for Modern Lessons in the Cuban Missile Crisis
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Students examine newly uncovered research on what took place during those 13 days in the fall of 1962. They?ll decide whether the crisis, a turning point in the Cold War, stands as an example of cool leadership under pressure or a cascade of error and miscalculation. Extension activities allow them to dig deeper into factors that made the Cuban missile crisis such a turning point, and explore continuing or potential conflicts that might put today?s world at similar risk.

Provider:
New York Times
Author:
Tom Marshall & Michael Gonchar
Date Added:
06/24/2019
Follow the Leader!
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Educational Use
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In this lesson, students choose a leader and a follower from "Animal Farm" and write an essay explaining how the behavior of each contributes to the loss of freedom and equality.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Beacon Learning Center
Author:
Beacon Learning Center
Date Added:
04/23/2019
Free Speech
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This activity engages students in an analysis of the 2008 speech by Barack Obama on race. Students will then create an annotated version of the speech that has them analyze and comment upon Obama's use of history, rhetoric, and language in his message. Students can also create a hypertext of this assignment in order to publish works in different media.

Provider:
New York Times
Author:
Jennifer Rittner and Javaid Khan
Date Added:
06/24/2019
German Unification
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Students will be able to explain the sources of German nationalism -- including cultural, intellectual, religious, political, and social -- and describe the tensions between nationalism as cultural or linguistic "sameness," e.g. , "German," as well as nationalism as defined by loyalty to a national political institution, e.g. , "Germany." Students will also analyze the creation of the German Empire as constructed "from above" by Prussian leadership through political institutions, economic interest, diplomacy, and war and the consequences of this for political, religious, and nationalistic opponents of German unification. Lastly, students will examine the co-option of traditional political factions such as liberals and conservatives by German unifiers and the emergence of new political groups as various national minority parties, including the Catholic Center Party and the Social Democrats, as a result of unification.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Social Studies
World History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
College Board
Author:
College Board
Date Added:
02/26/2019
A Ghostly Presence: Is Toni Morrison's Novel Beloved a True Ghost Story?
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In this lesson, students consider whether the eponymous character in Toni Morrison's classic novel Beloved is a ghost. Students consider powerpoints with prompt questions about the book, discuss the novel, and create an argument about whether the novel should be considered a ghost story.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Bright Hub Education
Author:
Sarah Degnan Moje
Date Added:
02/26/2019
Hammurabi's Code: What Does It Tell Us About Old Babylonia?
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Students learn about life in Babylonia through the lens of Hammurabi's Code. This lesson is designed to extend world history curricula on Mesopotamia and to give students a more in-depth view of life in Babylonia during the time of Hammurabi.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Social Studies
World History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Diagram/Illustration
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Primary Source
Simulation
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEments
Author:
David Kleiner
Date Added:
02/26/2019
Hieroglyphs and Communication
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The focus of this lesson is on the use of hieroglyphs as a form of communication, record keeping, and as a means for preserving and passing down history. Students will learn basic information about the alphabet, common Egyptian words, and how to read hieroglyphic messages. Students will also practice using hieroglyphs to create messages of their own.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Social Studies
World History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
PBS
Author:
Lisa Prososki
Date Added:
02/26/2019