Author:
Melody Casey
Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Level:
Middle School
Grade:
7
Tags:
  • GEDB
  • Global Education
  • License:
    Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial
    Language:
    English

    Education Standards

    GEDB The Power of Literacy: Illiteracy Matters (Lesson 2 of 4)

    GEDB The Power of Literacy:  Illiteracy Matters (Lesson 2 of 4)

    Overview

    Students will determine central ideas on the concept of illiteracy and will cite several pieces of textual evidence to support their analysis. Students will analyze and discuss the main ideas and supporting details presented in diverse media and formats and explain how the ideas clarify the concept of illiteracy. They will acknowledge new information expressed by others and, when warranted, modify their own views. This lesson was developed by Kimm Murfitt as part of their completion of the North Carolina Global Educator Digital Badge program. This lesson plan has been vetted at the local and state level for standards alignment, Global Education focus, and content accuracy.            

    Lesson Plan

    Description

    Students will determine central ideas on the concept of illiteracy and will cite several pieces of textual evidence to support their analysis. Students will analyze and discuss the main ideas and supporting details presented in diverse media and formats and explain how the ideas clarify the concept of illiteracy. They will acknowledge new information expressed by others and, when warranted, modify their own views.


    Content

    Learning Targets and Criteria for Success

    1. Students will determine central ideas on the concept of illiteracy and will cite several pieces of textual evidence to support their analysis.
    2. Students will analyze and discuss the main ideas and supporting details presented in diverse media and formats and explain how the ideas clarify a topic, text, or issue under study.
    3. Students will acknowledge new information expressed by others and, when warranted, modify their own views.

    Learning Tasks and Practice

    Connection:

    Students would be given a connection to their past instruction. Yesterday we defined illiteracy and explored our personal views on the topic. We also studied the statistics, and identified areas of the world with significant illiteracy rates. Today we will begin investigating the concept of illiteracy to determine patterns that could contribute to this issue.

    Teaching Point:

    Today we are going to begin exploring the stories of real people who exemplify the challenges of illiteracy. I want to remind you that thoughtful readers mark the texts they read and sometimes reread the sections that seem especially important. As they mark and reread important sections, they draw inferences about bigger ideas within the text.

    Lesson Procedures:
    Initial Reading-Using the text Off to Class: Incredible and Unusual Schools Around the World by Susan Hughes, students will be asked to read the following selections:

    • New Ideas for Old Resources
    • ABC is for Everyone
    • A School on the Move

    When they read, they will be asked to pay attention to any big ideas that they feel are emerging from the text. Refer back to anchor charts of different ways notes can be taken in order to not simply summarize but to analyze for bigger ideas. Anchor charts are a part of most ELA classrooms that center the strategies students need to be successful in their classrooms.  If this is not a part of your current classroom you may want to provide a mini-lesson on how to take notes in a meaningful way in order to capture important ideas.  They may note statistics that seem important, unique situations, problems, etc. Remind them to make a careful decision as to how they will capture their notes so that they can share their ideas meaningfully with others.

    Reading Through a Lens:

    Ask students to share ideas with a partner on what they noticed from the initial readings. Then, ask them to re-read a second time with this lens:
    While reading the second time, determine an obstacle that could be contributing to illiteracy in the communities you are reading about and be prepared to share two pieces of text that support your view. This work would be shared back out in a whole group setting.


    Collecting and Documenting Evidence of Learning

    Students will write a short reflection in their notebooks that they would use as an “elevator speech” that would tell others what illiteracy is, why it’s a problem, and two factors that contribute to this issue. At the very end of class, students will partner up to give their “elevator speech.”