Author:
Carrie Robledo
Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Level:
Middle School
Tags:
License:
Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial
Language:
English

Education Standards

ELA - Analyzing Plot through Fractured Fairy Tales

ELA - Analyzing Plot through Fractured Fairy Tales

Overview

This lesson works well as a follow-up to “Analyzing the Elements of Plot”***

Students will work as a group to create their own fractured fairy tale.  Once their story is complete, they will work to create a visual using the Merge cube to pair with their presentation to peers.

Instructor Directions

 

Name of Project: Analyzing Plot through Fractured Fairy Tales

 

Project Description

Name of ProjectAnalyzing Plot through Fractured Fairy Tales
Subject AreaEnglish
Targeted Standards; ; ; ; ; ; RL.6.3  RL.7.3; ; ; ; ; ; Analyze how particular elements of a story or drama interact.
Driving Question / Problem / ActivatorStudents will analyze how particular elements ofa story or drama interact, specifically:
  • Applying knowledge of story structure in the creation of coherent stories
  • Developing visual literacy skills in creating effective presentations using a variety of technology
  • Evaluating the work of their collaborative group and the work of their peers
Learning Targets:How do the elements of a story work together?Using the chosen text (well-known fairy tale or storythe students all know), the teacher chooses one story elementand changes it. Possible questions to guide the discussion:● What would happen if _____ was changed to ____?● How would _____ be affected by _____?● As the story is written, how does _____ work with ____?
Project Summary***This lesson works well as a follow-up to “Analyzing the Elements of Plot”***Students will work as a group to create their own fractured fairy tale.  Once their story is complete, they will work to create a visual using the Merge cube to pair with their presentation to peers.
Estimated Time90 - 150 minutes
Materials / Resources (including link to slideshow if available)
  • Tablets
  •  Merge cubes
  • Cospaces pro with Merge add-on
  • Pdf (printable) of merge cube available here
  • A tech facilitator would be an excellent resource to utilize if available
Teacher walk-through:Ask: Introduce the engineer-design framework for learning. How can we design a space to:
  • Visually represent our story
  • Show how the elements of a story work together
Imagine: What makes a story interesting? If you are sharing a story with a friend, why would they want to hear it? Review the elements of plot and elements of a story.  Pass out organizer.In small groups, have students brainstorm different fairy tales they are familiar with that have a very different retelling (have examples on hand such as Cinder, Scarlet, Cress, Winter, Ella Enchanted, Hunted, Beastly, etc.)Plan: As a whole group, the teacher models fractured fairy tales using a well-known fairy tale that has been re-written (such as The True Story of the Three Little Pigs - link to video), or here is a Fractured Fairy Tales Booklist. Alternatively - you could discuss the current popular novels that are based on fairy tales (ex: Cinder series)After reading/viewing the story, allow time for small groups to compare the differences between the original and the “fractured” version and discuss.  Model using venn or other comparable mind map on the board and discuss in whole group.  Review the most common ways to fracture a fairy tale (if needed) using this resource.Allow time to view a model that has already been completed to show a basic plotline of a fractured fairy tale. (examples - Hansel and Gretel or Goldilocks and the Three Bears)In small groups, students will pick a common fairy tale to fracture (alt. - assign a fairy tale or pass out short children’s books).Differentiation:
  • Higher level  - Allow students to create their own organizer for how they will fracture their story, filling out a basic outline to help with organization before moving on to the actual organizer. Groups can either break the story down for each member to work on smaller components, or work as a group to decide what elements of their fairy tale they wish to change.  Once the changes are decided upon, they can begin assembling their story in the organizer and start writing their story.
  • Lower level - Students will use a resource like this by Readwritethink.org. It allows them to type their changes in specific boxes and it “writes” the fairy tale for them.
Create: After checking to make sure stories have all the correct components, students can begin strategizing how they want to create their Merge cube scenes.  The six sides should include the “cover” of their story, the introduction, rising action, climax, falling action, and resolution. Introduce rubric for Merge cube presentationCospaces - Each student will work to create their own scenes using the story their group created.  Tip: teach the toolbar associated with the Merge cube explicitly and allow practice time. Tutorial here.Option: add animation to characters after scenes have been set up on the cube.Improve: In original small groups, students will view each member’s cube and make a list of three things they would like to do to improve their own cube. Allow time for improvements.  Small group will then choose one student’s cube to present.Gallery walk -Students rotate through stations (leaving tablets with the cube) to view other groups’ story cubes.  Have the original story out as well for students to read through their fractured fairy tale.  Have +/- chart for improvements to the cube they are viewing. Students must add a positive before adding any constructive criticism.After making a full rotation through the groups, allow time to fix glitches and improve their cube.Closure/Student Reflections: Each group has an opportunity to present their fractured fairy tale to the class, with classmates given the code for the presenting groups cube to view in front of them while the story is presented. Class discussion:● How does the story element, ______, interact with the other element of ______ in the text?● If the story element, ______, was changed to something else, how would it affect the text?● How does story element, ______, shape the story element of ______ ?Student reflection:  Students reflect on their visual representation and the process of creating it. How did it go? What did you learn? What went well? What could have been better?Possible Modifications/Extensions: Included throughout lesson
TagsELA 6-8; Elements of Plot; RL.3

Project Outline 

AskHow can we design a space to:
  • Visually represent our story
  • Show how the elements of a story work together
ImagineWhat makes a story interesting? If you are sharing a story with a friend, why would they want to hear it? In small groups, brainstorm different fairy tales you are familiar with that have a very different retelling (have examples on hand such as Cinder, Scarlet, Cress, Winter, Ella Enchanted, Hunted, Beastly, etc.)
PlanWe are going to walk through a well-known fairy tale that has been re-written (options in teacher walk-through) In small groups, we will be comparing the original and the “fractured” version. We will come back together to discuss and create a mind map on the board.  *Review the most common ways to fracture a fairy tale (if needed) using this resource.*Let’s take a look at an example scene from a fairy tale in Cospaces. (Hansel and Gretel or Goldilocks and the Three Bears)In your groups, pick a common fairy tale to fracture (alt. - assign a fairy tale or pass out short children’s books)*See differentiation in teacher walk-through for completing stories in small groups.*
CreateYou can now begin strategizing how you want to create your Merge cube scenes to look.  The six sides should include the “cover” of their story, the introduction, rising action, climax, falling action, and resolution. *Introduce rubric for Merge cube presentation*You have your story that you created in your group, but you will be creating your own Merge cube.  (Option: add animation to characters after scenes have been set up on the cube.)
ImproveWe are moving back into our small groups for this portion, you will view each member’s cube and make a list of three things you would like to improve on your own cube. After adjustments are made, you will come back together and choose one cube from your group to use for your presentation.Gallery walk -You will rotate through stations to view other groups’ story cubes and read their fractured fairy tale.  The +/- chart is for improvements.  You must add a positive before adding any constructive criticism.After making a full rotation through the groups, we will return to our own cubes and spend some time improving our product.
Closure / Student ReflectionsEach group will have an opportunity to present your fractured fairy tale to the class, while each group is presenting, we will be viewing their cube in our small groups.  Class discussion:● How does the story element, ______, interact with the other element of ______ in the text?● If the story element, ______, was changed to something else, how would it affect the text?● How does story element, ______, shape the story element of ______ ?Student reflection:  Do you feel like your cube is a quality visual representation of your story?  How do you feel about the process of creating the visual? How did it go with your group members? What did you learn? What went well? What could have been better?
Possible Modifications / Extensions*See teacher walk-through*

Evaluation (Pre/Post)  

Pre-Test

  1. The events that happen in a story are called the _____.
  1. Cliffhanger
  2. Exposition
  3. Plot
  4. Mood

 

2. In the _______ stage of the plot of a story, the setting and characters (especially the main character, known as the protagonist) are introduced, as well as the main problem, conflict or goal of the story.

  1. Exposition
  2. Climax
  3. Plot
  4. Tone

 

3. The ______ is the turning point in the plot of a story. It involves the central struggle, the most emotional part of the storyline, and it often involves the most action.

  1. Falling Action
  2. Mood
  3. Characters
  4. Climax

 

 

Post-Test

 

LetterTermDefinition
 Exposition/Introduction
  1. The turning point in the plot of a story. It involves the central struggle, the most emotional part of the storyline, and it often involves the most action
 Rising Action
  1. The action winds down, loose ends get tied up, events are resolved and we learn what happened as a result of the characters’ decisions.
 Climax
  1.  The goal is resolved and the conflict ends. This is the end of the story.
 Falling Action
  1. The setting and characters are introduced, as well as the main problem or conflict of the story
 Denouement/Resolution
  1. An inciting incident pushes the plot into motion, events begin to build, the characters take action. There is often a sense of tension or suspense.

 

● How does story element, ______, shape the story element of ______ ?

● How do you know?

● What pieces of evidence support that?

 

 

Credits or Modified From

Additional Resources / Help for teaching this lesson

Vertical Progression of standard RL.3:

Source: https://drive.google.com/file/d/13QPZ9TexB7v8--YTTVOmXKaBS7EEU6IU/view

 

NCDPI ELA Question Stems by standard:

RL6.3:

● At what point in the story did the character change?

● How does the character’s reaction to _______ add to the plot?  

● What is the sequence of events?  

● What are the key details throughout the story that lead to a resolution?

● How does the character _______ respond to the challenge presented

by _______?

● Which event contributes to _______?

● How does the character change as a result of the _______event?

● How does the plot unfold?

 

RL7.3:

● How does the setting influence the character’s actions?

● How does the setting move the plot forward?

● If the _______ (setting, characterization, conflict, point of view) was

changed, how would that alter the plot?

 

RL8.3:

● How do the characters’ actions advance the plot?

● What does the dialogue reveal about the characters?

● How does _______ incident provoke the character to _______?

● How do the events and interactions in the story (or drama) drive the

plot?