Author:
Carrie Robledo
Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Level:
Middle School
Tags:
License:
Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial
Language:
English

Education Standards

7th Grade ELA - Elements of Stories

7th Grade ELA - Elements of Stories

Overview

 

This is a project centering around students writing any narrative story of their choosing. The teacher will go through the process of labeling the parts of a story with a narrative as a class and demonstrate why each one fits in that story element. Students will then be given a topic to write their own story on that will fit into each labeled story element. Students will then be asked to summarize these events into visual images that will be created using CoSpaces. They will then be challenged to create at least 3 different stories out of the same original events they created on their CoSpaces story cube.

Instructor Directions

 

7th Grade ELA- Elements of Stories

 

Project Description

Name of Project7th Grade ELA- Elements of Stories
Subject AreaEnglish
Targeted Standards; ; ; ; ; ; RL.7.3 W.7.3; ; ; ; ; ;
Driving Question / Problem / ActivatorWhat are the different elements of a story and how do they function?
Project SummaryThis is a project centering around students writing any narrative story of their choosing. The teacher will go through the process of labeling the parts of a story with a narrative as a class and demonstrate why each one fits in that story element. Students will then be given a topic to write their own story on that will fit into each labeled story element. Students will then be asked to summarize these events into visual images that will be created using CoSpaces. They will then be challenged to create at least 3 different stories out of the same original events they created on their CoSpaces story cube.
Estimated Time5 days (5 hours)
Materials / ResourcesChromebooks, tablet, merge cube, CoSpaces accountsDay 1: Students will watch the short film video below as a class. (This can be any short story you would like to go over as a class for modeling purposes.)https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eY8-pGRx8RE&feature=emb_logoAfter having the students write down a summary for the understanding of the main events, review the elements of a story below, and show how they fit into this particular story.
  1. Exposition- How the story begins
  2. Rising Action- The events that lead to the climax
  3. Climax- The most intense, exciting, or important moment of the story
  4. Falling Action- The events after the climax of the story
  5. Resolution- How the story ends
“Slacker” Short Film Example
  1. Exposition- Ben and his girlfriend go out to eat and she breaks up with him.
  2. Rising Action- Ben goes to school, realizes his presentation is due that day, then rushes home to get it.
  3. Climax- Ben’s bike breaks down on the way back to school, so he runs back in order to make it back to school on time for his presentation.
  4. Falling Action- Ben makes it back and begins his presentation.
  5. Resolution- Ben realizes he brought the wrong flash drive for his presentation.
Ask students to reorder the events to make the same type of story. Give time for individual brainstorming and reordering.(Possible reorder example)
  1. Exposition- Ben goes to school, realizes his presentation is due that day, then rushes home to get it.
  2. Rising Action- Ben’s bike breaks down on the way back to school, so he runs back in order to make it back to school on time for his presentation.
  3. Climax- Ben makes it back and begins his presentation.
  4. Falling Action- Ben realizes he brought the wrong flash drive for his presentation.
  5. Resolution- Ben and his girlfriend go out to eat and she breaks up with him.
Ask students to reorder the events to change it from a story about his failure to a story where he has success. Give time for individual brainstorming and reordering.***Note that the events below change, which changes some of the effects of the events from the original, but stays true to the main plot of the story. When discussing these events, the major change is that he realized the flash drive was needed in the exposition, which affects the resolution because he proves to others that he could get away with slacking and still get the grade he needed to get. (Possible reorder example)
  1. Exposition- Ben goes to school and realizes he brought the wrong flash drive for his presentation.
  2. Rising Action- Ben’s bike breaks down on the way back to school, so he runs back in order to make it back to school on time for his presentation.
  3. Climax- Ben makes it back and begins his presentation.
  4. Falling Action- Ben makes it back and begins his presentation.
  5. Resolution- Ben and his girlfriend go out to eat.
.Day 2: The teacher reviews the lesson from yesterday, showing how changing any part of a story can make the storytelling overall different.Have each student write their own fictional or non-fictional story about how someone overcame a major issue/obstacle in their lives. The students should type this into a google document for editing purposes. Once it is completed, they should arrange it into the format below on their own document. (Teacher/Peer review is recommended at this stage to make sure the storytelling is being done correctly.)
  1. Exposition-
  2. Rising Action 1-
  3. Rising Action 2-
  4. Climax-
  5. Falling Action-
  6. Resolution-
Day 3:Students will be introduced to CoSpaces and shown a visual example of the teacher’s original example of how six elements of the story “Slacker” were out into the system.Example with “Slacker” on CoSpaces: https://edu.CoSpaces.io/AYV-FLVStudents will begin designing their ideas for what image they want for each of the six events. Once that has been approved by either a peer or teacher, students can begin designing their six elements into the six sides of the eventual story merge cube.***Students should not label which part goes in what order and use minimal words in their design.Day 4:Students should continue the process of putting their writing into their visual design. The time this process takes will vary. This should be turned into the teacher digitally and their name taken off of it for public viewing for the purposes of the next step.**When received, the teacher should change the order of the cubes by using the left slide to click and drag them into a random order for students to view on day 5.Day 5:Students will be placed in groups of 3 or 4 each with a tablet. They will be given a random student’s CoSpaces design and a merge cube to view it. Once each student has been able to view it, students will then be asked to independently write a story that includes the events of all sides of the merge cube. ***Students will need to keep looking at the merge cube design as they write, so make sure it is available throughout this process.The students will share their stories and determine which one has the “best-intended” fit. (After the writing is done, you could also ask them to choose which one fits different criteria)Students will share with the whole class the story they chose to write, followed by the sharing of the original story that the cube was based on to see how this compares. Use the questions below to guide this discussion or take their answers for an assessment.
  1. What elements of the story are the same? (Use the terms from the beginning of the lesson to discuss)
  2. What elements of the story are different?
  3. How does each of the differences change the story?
***Use the terms from the beginning of the lesson to have these conversationsAfter this, students can improve their story writing or visual representation as much as the teacher desired, either keeping the criteria the same or changing it to match a different challenge. When the desired goals have been met,  have students take the post-test. See below for multiple extensions/alterations of this activity.
TagsELA, story elements, introduction, rising action, climax, falling action, resolution, creative writing

Project Outline 

AskWhat makes each element of a story different from another?
ImagineIs it possible to make six different events into multiple independent stories?
PlanReview the elements of a story and know how each can function in storytelling
  1. Introduction
  2. Rising Action
  3. Climax
  4. Falling Action
  5. Resolution
CreateUse CoSpaces to design a story that can be written in as many different combinations of different elements of a story as possible. You must have 6 story elements made for the five above, so your sixth element can be the second part of any other element.
ImproveTry to write using your story element combinations and see how many can reasonably fit using them in different orders. Have a different story with each element able to be used as a beginning. Have different people try and use your storytelling elements
Closure / Student ReflectionsReview how the function of each element of storytelling determines where it fits in the plot diagram and how that can affect how the other elements affect each other.
Possible Modifications / ExtensionsModifications: For more proficient students: See how many different combinations of stories can be told with the same elements. Have students be given the elements used, then after having them read a story made with those elements, have them guess the order they chose to use them in.

Evaluation (Pre/Post)  

Pre-Test:

1. What is the part of the story that shows how the story begins?

  1. Exposition
  2. Rising Action
  3. Climax
  4. Falling Action

 

2. What is the part of the story that shows the events that lead to the climax?

  1. Exposition
  2. Rising Action
  3. Resolution
  4. Falling Action

 

3. What is the part of the story defined by the most intense, exciting, or important moment?

  1. Resolution
  2. Rising Action
  3. Climax
  4. Falling Action

 

4. What is the part of the story that shows the events after the climax of the story?

  1. Resolution
  2. Rising Action
  3. Climax
  4. Falling Action

 

5. What is the part of the story that shows how the story ends?

  1. Exposition
  2. Resolution
  3. Climax
  4. Falling Action

 

Answers: 1. A 2. B 3. C 4. D 5. B

 

Post Test:

 

1. What is the part of the story that shows how the story begins?

  1. Exposition
  2. Rising Action
  3. Climax
  4. Falling Action

 

2. What is the part of the story that shows the events that lead to the climax?

  1. Exposition
  2. Rising Action
  3. Resolution
  4. Falling Action

 

3. What is the part of the story defined by the most intense, exciting, or important moment?

  1. Resolution
  2. Rising Action
  3. Climax
  4. Falling Action

 

4. What is the part of the story that shows the events after the climax of the story?

  1. Resolution
  2. Rising Action
  3. Climax
  4. Falling Action

 

5. What is the part of the story that shows how the story ends?

  1. Exposition
  2. Resolution
  3. Climax
  4. Falling Action

 

Answers: 1. A 2. B 3. C 4. D 5. B

 

Credits or Modified From

Additional Resources / Help for teaching this lesson

How to view the merge cube from the teacher CoSpaces account:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DrIl-epaWbI

 

How to use CoSpaces (playlist of how-to videos to get started):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=15Vlqe22_x0&list=PLwVby6khJkrpf1ssQ31qIb0DxcOlAKTgY

 

 

 

Sample Pictures / Video

“Slacker” Example on CoSpaces: https://edu.CoSpaces.io/AYV-FLV

Teacher Comments of what worked/did not work well

-The limitations that you may find in how students work with CoSpaces may dictate alternations you could make for the purposes of this project. For example, each story may or may not have the items students may need for a story, so being flexible with their creations and how they use their think/say word bubbles is important

-Depending on the student population you are teaching, this can be adapted to any secondary (6th-12th grade) ELA class.

-Refining the project itself is similar to any creative writing refinement, but make sure to stick more to the engineering model with your feedback and further from the cut and dry grammar analytics when judging the final product

 

Adapt to another story:

This lesson can be adapted to any story that fits into a plot diagram with the elements of a story being taught.

This lesson can challenge students to do many of the following tasks.

-See how many versions of the story can be written with the same story cube that makes sense

-Give students different outcomes/premises that the story must include, then have rewriting/rearranging

-Have students use 2 or more different story cubes for more possible events to choose from, creating multiple variations of the stories that could be told.