Author:
Melody Casey
Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Level:
Lower Primary
Grade:
2
Tags:
  • IRPMATH
    License:
    Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial
    Language:
    English

    Education Standards

    Amazing Shapes (AIG IRP)

    Amazing Shapes (AIG IRP)

    Overview

    This activity focuses on the part of the standard that says “Recognize that equal shares of identical wholes need not have the same shape.” Students will use 1 inch square blocks to illustrate this statement. After creating their designs and discussing the fractional representations, they will solve and discuss word problems based on this concept. This lesson was developed by NCDPI as part of the Academically and/or Intellectually Gifted Instructional Resources Project. This lesson plan has been vetted at the state level for standards alignment, AIG focus, and content accuracy.

    Lesson Overview

    Brief Description of Lesson/Task/Activity: This activity focuses on the part of the standard that says “Recognize that equal shares of identical wholes need not have the same shape.” Students will use 1 inch square blocks to illustrate this statement. After creating their designs and discussing the fractional representations, they will solve and discuss word problems based on this concept.

    Time Frame: 1 day

    Type of Differentiation for AIGs:

    • Extension

    Adaptations for AIGs:

    • Process
    • Product

    Explanation of How Resource is Appropriate for AIGs: In the unpacking of the Common Core standard, students are expected to be able to see that rectangles divided into different shapes still have equivalent pieces – e.g. in a square divided diagonally into 4 equal triangles each triangle is the same fourth as one of the four squares formed when dividing the square into fourths from the midpoints of the sides.   In this activity students are expected to understand that the same size portion is the same even when removed from the context of the rectangle and made into a design. This is more abstract and provides interest and variety.  

    Needed Resources/Materials:

    • Plastic or wooden colored tiles
    • 1 inch square graph paper
    • Colored paper cut into 1 inch squares
    • Construction paper or other paper as a background.

    Teacher Notes: Colored paper cut into one-inch squares can be created using a paper cutter or a die-cut machine.

    Stage 1: Engage

    Teacher: Here is a rectangle.  I am going to divide it in half. Is each side equal?  Now I will take the one half that is divided into small squares and make a design .I used the same squares so I know that this design is equal to half of the original rectangle. 

    Use the attached resources to show students examples as you talk.

    Stage 2: Elaborate

    You may use the colored tiles to create your rectangle and make a plan.  Divide your rectangle into halves, thirds, or fourths.  Draw your rectangle on the graph paper.  Then use the colored paper tiles to make a design with a fraction of your rectangle.  Label your design as one half or two thirds or whatever fraction you are illustrating. Have students create designs where the color represents half of the design but the equal shares of identical wholes need not have the same shape.  After students have shown and explained their art creation, give students the problem solving worksheet.  Ask students to share their solutions in pairs.  Have each pair choose a solution to share with the whole group.

    Stage 3: Evaluate

    Check the original rectangle on the graph paper to see if the newly created design represents the fraction as labeled.
    For word problems, listen as students share solutions.