Author:
Melody Casey
Subject:
English Language Arts, Mathematics
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Level:
Lower Primary
Grade:
2
Tags:
  • IRPMATH
    License:
    Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial
    Language:
    English

    Education Standards

    Convince Me (AIG IRP)

    Convince Me (AIG IRP)

    Overview

    This activity takes place after students have had the opportunity to learn strategies such as using place value, decomposing into tens, commutative property, using concrete models, or strategies they come up with on their own to add two numbers together. Students should work in small groups of three or four. Before this activity, students may make a list of strategies they know for adding numbers or they may identify a list already posted in the classroom. Place three or four sets of 0-9 number tiles (digit-cards) in a bag. The first student draws 4 number tiles and uses them to create a 2-digit plus 2-digit addition problem. All students in the group use models, pencil and paper, or whiteboards to solve the problem using a strategy. Taking turns, each student has the opportunity to convince others that the strategy chosen is the best or most efficient for the problem. This lesson was developed by NCDPI as part of the Academically and/or Intellectually Gifted Instructional Resources Project. This lesson plan has been vetted at the state level for standards alignment, AIG focus, and content accuracy.

    Lesson Overview

    Brief Description of Lesson/Task/Activity: This activity takes place after students have had the opportunity to learn strategies such as using place value, decomposing into tens, commutative property, using concrete models, or strategies they come up with on their own to add two numbers together. Also students should have experience on how to work in a small group with ground rules such as “one student talks at a time,” “listen carefully to each other,” and “question with respect.” Students should work in small groups of three or four. Before this activity, students may make a list of strategies they know for adding numbers or they may identify a list already posted in the classroom. Place three or four sets of 0-9 number tiles (digit-cards) in a bag. The first student draws 4 number tiles and uses them to create a 2-digit plus 2-digit addition problem. 
     
    Example: Student draws 9, 4, 1, 7 and creates the problem 17 + 49 = ?. 

    All students in the group use models, pencil and paper, or whiteboards to solve the problem using a strategy. Taking turns, each student has the opportunity to convince others that the strategy chosen is the best or most efficient for the problem. (Mathematical Practice:  3. Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.)  Once the student has finished the explanation the next student may give a thumbs up indicating that the strategy worked and was clear, or the student may ask a question about the strategy or show how the strategy he/she chose may work better.  After each student has had an opportunity to discuss the current problem, the bag of tiles is passed to the second student and the activity is repeated.  Once students are comfortable with this activity, they may expand it to add larger numbers, and the teacher may want the students to write and illustrate their reasoning.

    Time Frame: 1 class period

    Type of Differentiation for AIGs:

    • Extension

    Adaptations for AIGs:

    • Process

    Explanation of How Resource is Appropriate for AIGs: This activity uses higher levels of thinking such as analyzing and evaluating.  Although the answer to an addition problem is closed, the activity is open-ended in that the student can choose a strategy to use. Students are required to prove their thinking. (Mathematical Practice:  3. Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others). Students work in a small group structure. 

    Needed Resources/Materials:

    • 3 – 4 sets of 0-9 number tiles or digit-cards for each group.
    • A small paper bag or cloth bag for the tiles
    • Pencil and paper or whiteboards and markers

    Teacher Notes: Before this activity can be used, students need help to develop ground rules for working in small groups, and they will have already been exposed to multiple strategies for solving addition problems. 

    Mathematical Practices:

    3. Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others

    Stage 1: Engage

    If the classroom does not already have rules posted for small group work or if a list of strategies has not yet been created, do that first.

    Let’s look at some of the strategies we have used so far to add and subtract numbers.  If I wanted to add 47 and 35, what could I try?  Work this problem on your white board and be ready to tell what you did.  (Let a couple of students explain their thinking. If necessary, model another possible way).

    Stage 2: Elaborate

    Arrange students in groups of three or four. The first student draws 4 number tiles from a bag.  The student creates an addition or subtraction problem using the tiles and writes it on his/her whiteboard.  The other students in the group copy that problem.  All students in the group solve the problem.  Each student in turn explains how they solved the problem.  The other students may give thumbs up or ask a clarifying question.  When each student has explained his/her strategy for solving the problem, the next student draws four tiles and creates a problem.  When students are comfortable with working this way, they can draw more tiles and create problems with larger numbers. Encourage students to try a different strategy, maybe one of the strategies that a classmate tried.

    Stage 3: Evaluate

    The teacher will listen to each student explain a strategy for one or more problems looking for a correct answer and an efficient strategy to show proficiency and will provide feedback and direction as needed.