Author:
Melody Casey
Subject:
English Language Arts, Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Level:
Lower Primary
Grade:
2
Tags:
  • IRPSS
    License:
    Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial
    Language:
    English

    Education Standards

    Differing Perspectives of an Event in History (AIG IRP)

    Differing Perspectives of an Event in History (AIG IRP)

    Overview

    After discussing how people have different perspectives on the same topic/event/movement in a fun way by using a familiar fairy tale, higher level students will be asked to read portions of a book or articles from the internet to find out at least 2 differing perspectives of a historical event/movement. Students will get a R.A.F.T. so they may write with different ROLES in mind to different AUDIENCES in a particular FORMAT and on a TOPIC.  Next students will share their writings with other students in the class. I am giving examples of how to use this activity with the attacks of 9/11, but other historical events/movements could be used (Civil War, prohibition, American Revolution, Civil Rights Movement, etc.). This lesson was developed by NCDPI as part of the Academically and/or Intellectually Gifted Instructional Resources Project. This lesson plan has been vetted at the state level for standards alignment, AIG focus, and content accuracy.

    Lesson Overview

    Brief Description of Lesson/Task/Activity: After discussing how people have different perspectives on the same topic/event/movement in a fun way by using a familiar fairy tale, higher level students will be asked to read portions of a book or articles from the internet to find out at least 2 differing perspectives of a historical event/movement. Students will get a R.A.F.T. so they may write with different ROLES in mind to different AUDIENCES in a particular FORMAT and on a TOPIC.   Next students will share their writings with other students in the class. I am giving examples of how to use this activity with the attacks of 9/11, but other historical events/movements could be used (Civil War, prohibition, American Revolution, Civil Rights Movement, etc.).

    Time Frame: 1-2 hours

    Type of Differentiation for AIGs:

    • Extension
    • Acceleration

    Adaptations for AIGs:

    • Content
    • Process
    • Product

    Explanation of How Resource is Appropriate for AIGs: This task is appropriate for higher-level students because while they continue to work with the Essential Standard for this grade level, they will also think critically to write from different perspectives (ROLES) and possibly research different perspectives of the event/movement.  Students will work with third grade objectives for writing.

    Needed Resources/Materials:

    • RAFT Activity (attached)
    • Rubric (attached)
    • Chief by Chris Ganci  (In this loving biography, the son of Peter Ganci memorializes the FDNY fire chief who died trying to save his men and civilians on September 11, 2001.)
    • 911 by Michael Cart (In this book of poems, short stories, and essays, various authors relate how the terrorist attacks of 911 affected them and the world.)
    • Books for “Engage” part of lesson:  The Three Little Pigs By Golden Books and The True Story of the Three Little Pigs by Joe Scieszka

    TEACHER NOTES: The teacher may find books or articles on the internet for students to use to read about different perspectives of an historical event or movement.

    Stage 1: Engage

    The teacher will begin the lesson by asking:
    Have you ever been in a situation in which you and someone else witnessed an event (fight, car accident, game, etc.), but when you started to tell someone else about it, you and the other person had different versions about how it happened or came about?

    The teacher will read the fairy tale (any author with the original version of the story is fine) of The Three Little Pigs.  She will discuss with students from whose perspective they believe the story is written (the pigs).  The teacher will ask, “Do you think the wolf would agree with the pigs’ version of the story? What might he have to say about it?” 

    Then she will read to the students The True Story of the Three Little Pigs by Joe Scieszka.  She will ask why the stories are so different.  She will discuss with students how witnesses of any event can have different perspectives of what happened.  She may talk with students about incidences that have happened in the class with students when something happened and how students had totally different stories/ interpretations of what occurred when they were talking about the same exact event.  The teacher will create a Venn Diagram with students comparing/contrasting the two pig stories (parts of the interpretations of what happened were the same, but some were very different).

    Stage 2: Elaborate

    After the teacher discusses different perspectives with the whole class using the fairy tale, she will work with higher-level students to help them research information (through books and/or the internet) that demonstrates how different people/groups of people view an historical event/movement differently and why.  In this particular lesson, I would recommend exploring the attacks of 9/11 and possibly reading the books Chief by Chris Ganci and 911 by Michael Cart.  Students can read about how different people felt about 9/11 or what they saw from their “perspectives.”  Students can also explore what impact this event has had on our current life and times.  Higher-level students will be asked to work with a R.A.F.T.  Students will write from 1-4 ROLES. The teacher may decide how many she wants all students to write or she may differentiate within the higher level students by assigning different numbers of ROLES or just different ROLES according to what she wants each student to take from the assignment.

    Stage 3: Evaluate

    The teacher will assess students by using the attachment (rubric) for each written piece from the R.A.F.T.  The teacher can assign 1-4 written pieces per higher level student depending on time for the assignment.

    TEACHER NOTES: The teacher can tweak the rubric if she wishes to do so.