Author:
Melody Casey
Subject:
English Language Arts, Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Level:
Upper Primary
Grade:
3
Tags:
  • IRPSS
    License:
    Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial
    Language:
    English

    RAFT Historical Perspectives (AIG IRP)

    RAFT Historical Perspectives (AIG IRP)

    Overview

    The teacher will introduce students to the two web articles with perspectives about slavery (one from the perspective of a slave and one from the perspective of slave owners).  Then the higher level will have a discussion about the two perspectives. Higher-level students will write a R.A.F.T, assuming a ROLE and using the R.A.F.T and the rubric to guide their writing.  This lesson was developed by NCDPI as part of the Academically and/or Intellectually Gifted Instructional Resources Project. This lesson plan has been vetted at the state level for standards alignment, AIG focus, and content accuracy.

    Lesson Overview

    Brief Description of Lesson/Task/Activity: The teacher will introduce students to the two web articles with perspectives about slavery (one from the perspective of a slave and one from the perspective of slave owners).  Then the higher level will have a discussion about the two perspectives. Higher-level students will write a R.A.F.T, assuming a ROLE and using the R.A.F.T and the rubric to guide their writing.

    Time Frame: 1-2 hours

    Type of Differentiation for AIGs:

    • Extension
    • Acceleration

    Adaptations for AIGs:

    • Process
    • Product

    Explanation of How Resource is Appropriate for AIGs: This task is appropriate for a higher-level student because while the student continues to work with the Essential Standard for his grade level, he will also use fourth grade objectives for reading informational text and writing.  He will need to think critically and abstractly to discuss 2 different perspectives and then take on a ROLE and write from that perspective to a particular AUDIENCE in an assigned FORMAT and on the TOPIC of slavery.

    Needed Resources/Materials:

    TEACHER NOTES: The teacher should make sure the two websites above are available and working; if not, she should find 2 different perspectives of slavery.  These 2 perspectives are actually historical fiction, but that allows students to read the perspectives without inappropriate language.

    Stage 1: Engage

    The teacher will say to students, “Let me tell you a story.  There is a poor mother whose husband died last year.  She is working two jobs to support her three children.  It is difficult to pay the bills; she struggles daily just to keep enough food on the table.  One day as she is walking from work to the grocery store to get a can of beans for supper because that is all she can afford, she sees a wealthy looking man drive off in his sports car, and after he pulls off, she notices a hundred dollar bill on the ground.  She knows the description of the car and the license plate number.  She needs the hundred dollars desperately.”  What should she do?  If you think she should keep the money for her family, go to the far corner of the room.  If you think she should go find out whom the man was in the car, go stand on the carpet.  Students should discuss their reasoning for why they are standing where they are with the people in their group and then defend their reasons to the other group, and vice versa.  Then the teacher should ask students, “Why do we have a different perspective on this event?”  “What influences our perspectives?”  “Are answers to questions like this always black and white?”  “Is there a gray area?”

    Then the teacher will introduce the two internet articles to students to get them thinking about the following:

    • How many slaves felt about slavery.
    • How some slave owners felt about slaves, slavery, and their justification for buying and selling other humans.


    Questions to engage students in discussion:

    1. How do you think slaves felt about slavery? Why?
    2. Why do you think slave owners kept slaves? 
    3. How do you think the perspective of a slave and a slave owner differ? Why?  What makes your perspective your perspective?
    4. Is it important to be able to put yourself in others’ shoes to see their perspective? Why?
    5. If you do look at others’ perspectives and not just your own, how do you think this might influence your decisions?
    6. Even if we all agree that slavery is wrong, what perspectives or experiences could cause people to justify slavery?

    Stage 2: Elaborate

    The higher-level students will read the two internet articles about slavery (one from a slave’s perspective and one from slave owners’ perspectives).  The students will have a discussion to compare/contrast the two perspectives, led by the teacher (see guiding questions below).  Then higher-level students will be given a R.A.F.T., and they will be expected to write from at least one of the ROLEs.  The teacher may decide how many ROLEs the students should assume and write about.

    Guiding questions to lead the discussion:

    1. Compare the perspective of the slave owner to the slave’s perspective of how slaves were treated and how they each felt about that treatment.
    2. When you are in a situation, does it depend on your perspective how you feel about the situation?  In your own life, can you think of a time when you and someone else see the same situation completely differently because of your perspective?  Have you ever gotten into trouble over something that you felt from your perspective was okay or right to do at the time, but the person you got into trouble with saw it from a different perspective?
    3. Regarding slavery, do you think slave owners felt differently about slaves and about how to treat slaves because they had never been slaves and did not have that perspective?
    4. If we take the time to step into others’ shoes and see their perspective on a belief, point of view, or situation, do you think we can make wiser decisions having seen it from the other perspective and not just our own?

    Stage 3: Evaluate

    The teacher will assess students using the attached rubric for writing with a R.A.F.T.

    TEACHER NOTES: The teacher can tweak the rubric if she wishes to do so.