Author:
Melody Casey
Subject:
English Language Arts, Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Level:
Lower Primary
Grade:
K
Tags:
  • IRPSS
    License:
    Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial
    Language:
    English

    Education Standards

    I Change and So Do Others (AIG IRP)

    I Change and So Do Others (AIG IRP)

    Overview

    After classroom discussions and activities of changes in people over time, higher-level students can extend their learning by creating a timeline of themselves and a timeline of a grandparent or parent. A grandparent would be preferable so a greater difference could be seen between the two. Then the student can articulate similarities and differences in the two. This lesson was developed by NCDPI as part of the Academically and/or Intellectually Gifted Instructional Resources Project. This lesson plan has been vetted at the state level for standards alignment, AIG focus, and content accuracy.

    Lesson Overview

    Brief Description of Lesson/Task/Activity: After classroom discussions and activities of changes in people over time, higher-level students can extend their learning by creating a timeline of themselves and a timeline of a grandparent or parent. A grandparent would be preferable so a greater difference could be seen between the two. Then the student can articulate similarities and differences in the two.

    Time Frame: 1-3 hours over a period of two weeks for homework 

    Type of Differentiation for AIGs:

    • Enrichment
    • Extension

    Adaptations for AIGs:

    • Process
    • Product

    Explanation of How Resource is Appropriate for AIGs: This task is appropriate for higher-level students because while the student continues to work with the Essential Standard for his grade level, he will also extend his learning by creating a timeline to show his own life and a timeline to show a parent’s or grandparent’s life. The student will also need to practice skills for presenting information to his classmates, comparing/contrasting his life to his parent’s/grandparent’s life.

    Needed Resources/Materials:

    • There is an attached form that the teacher may send home with the student asking parents to help with this project. 
    • pictures/drawings
    • a long paper or poster paper (strips of bulletin board paper would work well and that could be sent home with the student)
    • glue
    • scissors
    • a parent’s assistance with writing

    TEACHER NOTES: Students will need help with this project, but I recommend students do this one at home since parents will have pictures and know the lives of their child and parents or themselves.

    Stage 1: Engage

    The teacher should create a timeline of his life and share important changes with students (changes in schools, birthdays, special events, pictures which depict physical changes, jobs, family, etc.). The teacher should also create a timeline of an older person in his/her life (a parent, grandparent). After showing and discussing the two timelines with students, the teacher should point out differences and similarities. For example, a grandparent may have married much younger than the teacher, the grandparent will have aged more than the teacher, the grandparent may have different clothes, toys, activities, and special events than the teacher, and the teacher can explain why (they were born in different time periods, different items/technologies were available, etc.).

    Stage 2: Elaborate

    For most students in the class, the teacher could ask that they only complete one timeline of their own lives. Students could be asked to present their timelines talking about changes that they have had over their lives (appearance, height, toys they play with, things they can now do that they couldn’t previously, going to school, extra-curricular activities). For higher-level students, the teacher would send home the attached letter to the parent to have parents help these students create a timeline of the student’s life and timeline of an adult’s life (the older the better). The higher-level students will also be asked to compare/contrast his life to the life of the adult. The higher-level student will engage in deeper thinking as he must compare and contrast the two lives. Each student should be given a date to present their timelines to the class or a small group of students. The teacher may want to work with the student individually prior to the student sharing to make sure the student knows what he will say. 

    Stage 3: Evaluate

    Students will demonstrate their understanding of changes in people over time (physical changes, changes in activities, interests, etc.). They will also demonstrate their understanding of the similarities and differences in people who lived in earlier times and people who live and are growing up currently. They will show this understanding as they present their timelines. Students who demonstrate higher-level thinking will compare/contrast people’s lives, as in the following examples:

    My grandfather started going to school when he was seven and I started kindergarten when I was five because students didn’t go to school at five when my grandfather was in school like we do today.

    My grandmother didn’t go to college, but I plan to go to college. When my grandmother was 18, most girls did not attend college. Most girls were married much younger than they are today.

    Examples that students may share that are not necessarily higher-order thinking may be like the following examples:

    My grandmother and I look alike.
    My grandfather had a 5th birthday party, and so did I.
    My dad had a bike, and I have a bike.

    Assessment of student thinking is based on the depth and complexity of the students’ responses as well as the explanations provided for the responses (using the above as examples of possible responses).

    TEACHER NOTES:  Once the students’ timelines are complete, they can work in class to compare and contrast them. A teacher can guide students to look for comparisons in the two timelines by thoroughly discussing her own timelines over a period of days with the class. She can even have students help her compare/contrast the two timelines with things they notice or with questions to the teacher about the two timelines. Modeling how to present the timelines will be critical for the students to learn how to do it appropriately.