Webinar #1 - Reflect and Engage with Copyright

by Joanna Schimizzi 3 years ago

PLEASE reply directly to Joanna's post with your answer. You can reply to other people, but for your initial reply, please reply to Joanna to minimize notifications.

 

1) What was your previous experience with copyright and intellectual property prior to the webinar? 

2) How did you previously allow use of your intellectual property? 

3) How has your thought process changed? Please reference both the webinar and the extra resource you looked at.

 

 

KAREN HEILMAN 3 years ago

1) My previous experience with copyright and intellectual property is mostly through sharing and using resources from the Canvas Commons. Also, I teach students to always cite their sources and show them how to search for images labeled for reuse. 

2) I share freely with my colleagues within my district, no strings attached. On the Canvas Commons, I have shared under the following terms: attribution, non-commercial, share alike.

3) My thought process has not really changed, but I do wonder about the resources that I have adapted from copyrighted sources. During the webinar, participants posted where they get most of their resources, such as AVID, Actively Learn, CommonLit, Newsela, EdPuzzle, and Youtube, to name a few. Will resources adapted from these platforms be able to be shared here, and if so, how?

RAE THOMPSON 3 years ago

My previous experience with copyright and intellectual property has been through training sessions with our Director of DTL and other Technology department staff.  These sessions were focused on digital citizenship primarily.  I have always given freely of the things created through my classroom or the BTSP; what is mine is yours.  My belief has always been if it worked for me, it might work for you.  If you adapt it and it works better, let me know.  The more brains, the better!  Learning more about the Creative Commons licensing through the webinar and the CCSSO videos, I will begin to use the Attribution and in particular the Non-Commercial licensing.      

1) When our school district went 1 to 1 we spent a lot of time learning as teachers and instructing our students on copyright and fair use. We even spent an entire year in homeroom discussing ideas of digital citizenship. I require students to attribute resources that they use in classwork for any reason.

2) I share my resources within my PLC and now, in my current role, with other teachers within my district. Because everything is in Google Drive, I share freely to anyone that asks. 

3) It made me think that I should go back and include Creative Commons licensing on my documents. While I don't care about people "remixing" my stuff to make it better or more effective, I wouldn't be happy if they were selling it online.

NORMA BOONE 3 years ago

1. It has been quite some time since I have been involved with copyright and intellectual property. The media coordinator of the school where I worked always stayed on top of things. Also, when our Arts Program did their plays they had to make sure that all things were legal. In the capacity I am in now I do not readily deal with copyright issues.

2. Whatever I had was made available to individuals that worked in the same area as I did. I was not concerned about it.

3. In regards to the webinar I think back on a program I developed for incoming Freshman students. One of my co-workers told me I needed to claim my materials. Also, in my position any materials I have developed and re-worked does not belong to me, it belongs to the District. This was an example provided in the webinar regarding work materials not being your own, but the company you work for. I also looked at the Board Policies for my District on copyright laws.

Janet Dunn 3 years ago

1) What was your previous experience with copyright and intellectual property prior to the webinar? 

My previous experience with copyright and intellectual property prior to the webinar was several different workshops that expained copyright and interllectual property and what my school system expected me to do when using these sources or materials.   

2) How did you previously allow use of your intellectual property? 

I always made sure I cited any of my sources and if I bought a teaching book I made sure it allow reproducation of those materials.

3) How has your thought process changed? Please reference both the webinar and the extra resource you looked at.  My thought has changed 360.  After watching and hearing the webinar I realize that I need to make sure of anything I use or buy is allowing me to use or change it for classroom use.  I looked at several different resources and there is some cloudliness when it comes to a teacher using it for teaching purposes, so you really have to be careful.

 

SANDRA CARTER 3 years ago

1. Prior to the webinar, I was really only knowledgable about theatre related copyright. When we license with a company they specifically tell us what to say concerning attribution and copying. I know there are copyright and intellectual property issues with the other arts, which I am very interested in learning more about. 

2. Previously, I did not do anything to protect my intellectual property. I simply put my name on it as the author. 

3. After the webinar, I will definitely go back and add a correct licensing to my intellectual property. The webinar really explained the categories, which I had no idea about, and it's really not hard - just something to get in the practice of. It's really important for me to be an example so my teachers, who use copyrighted materials a lot in their classes (scripts, art, music) that as arts education educators we need to be knowledgable about this. I plan to show my staff the PPT presentation "What's Right and Wrong With Copyright?" at our next meeting. 

 

 

 

1) My previous experience with copyright and intellectual property prior to the webinar was not much really. Years ago, I worked at a school where the Media Specialist did a short Professional Development on the importance of making sure whatever we were using in class was alowed to be copied and/or shared. 

2) I have always just shared whatever I created with my temmates/teachers at my school without even thinking about it.

3) My thought process has changed quite a bit since the webinar and reviewing various resorces. I now know that whatever I create could actually belong to my district, a fact I had never even considered before. I also am curious as to how often materials we use at school are "remixed" or shared/copied when they really shouldn't be.

VANESSA BARNES 3 years ago

My previous experience with copyright and intellectual property prior to the webinar was emailing individuals to see if I could post their information on my website; utilize my district's resources; and coworkers willing to share ideas.

I would just share my information and resources not placing any kind of stipulations on the information. 

My thought process has not really changed but I do understand the importance of using other individuals created documents and the issues connected when used inappropriately.  The webinar has provided me with updated information because I do not remember looking for or using the images.  I mainly use books in my class or coworker's resources.  I'm thinking now I probably need to go back and ask them if they created or received somewhere else. LOL! I'm pretty sure many resources within education have been shared without citing correctly or ensuring what can and cannot be shared, modified, used commercially or non-commercially. This webinar has opened my eyes, again.

ADEN CRUMP 3 years ago

1.) Prior to the webinar I have had two different professional development workshops on the subject of copyright and intellectual property.

2.) Personally, if I have a resource I have created then I have no issues sharing it with teachers in the school or in the district. I have thought about putting some of my creations onto TPT, but I have not done so yet. I am always a little nervous sharing my creations.

3.) Reflecting on the webinar I find that I may need to start adding Creative Commons and non-commercial use to my creations. I like the idea of sharing with the community but I don't want anyone else using my creation and reselling it. The content of both the webinar and resource was useful and I will make sure I bring it up to my colleagues at the next PLC.

Angela Cogdill 3 years ago

My previous experience with copyright/intellectual property has been through training sessions with our staff especially around our IT Tools and Digitial Citizenship.  I share and post on our LMS with BTs, Mentors and Principals and now realize I should be citing the sources that are not labeled for future postings.

MARCY KEENER 3 years ago

1) What was your previous experience with copyright and intellectual property prior to the webinar? 

  • I have attened a face to face sesson facilitated by Joanna in Edgecomb county.  
  • I have also been a participant in the onlint resource review academy. 

2) How did you previously allow use of your intellectual property? 

  • I share freely with other personel in the disrtict. I have not shared any work beyond that realm. 

3) How has your thought process changed? Please reference both the webinar and the extra resource you looked at.

  • My thought process has not really changed- I believe in giving credit when credit is due. As many posted before me- I too wonder how works published and used in other sites will factor in and be shared on this platform?

1) My previous experience with copyright and intellectual property prior to the webinar, came from my work with Discovery Education.  I have worked as a content developer for several years and with this work copyright and intellectual property is extremely important.  

2) I have always allowed use of my intellectual property because it is my opinion that quality work should be shared with others so that everyone is benefiting from the work put in.  In addition, others can tweek the work so that the quality continues to develop and grow.

3) My thought process has not really changed, however the webinar did solidify the importance of understanding copyright and intellectual property for both our own work as well as what we obtain from other.

LAURI SCHATZ 3 years ago

1. What was your previous experince with copyright and intellectual property to the webinar?

When I taught elementary school most of my experience was shared resources between myself and other teachers.  But I had always taught my students to cite their sources correctly

2. How did you previously allow use of your intellectual property?

I've always shared my resources with other teachers because that has always been the right thing to do. I never even thought twice about it.

3. How has your thought process changed? Please reference both the webinar and the extra resource you looked at.

Personally my thought process hasn't changed much.  I would still be happy to share my resources that I've created to others because I know it would be helpful and not having to recreate a wheel.  If it works for me, then it might work for someone else with some tweaking.  I will always give credit where credit is due when using other's resourses or images.  

LINDA BULLUCK 3 years ago

The only experience I have is with teaching students to cite sources in their work.

I have always shared any resources that I have with others.  I also make it a practice to give credit to authors when using their work in my presentations.

After participating in the webinar and viewing several videos on copyright, I will be even more cognizant of checking attributes of resources before using them.

ANGELA SIMS 3 years ago

1.  Limited would describe my previous experience with copyright and intellectual property.   I have been exposed to workshops that touched on what my school system expected me to do when using copyrighted materials.

 

2.  I allowed my colleagues to use my materials with no directions on what they can and cannot do.

 

3.    My thoughts have not necessarily changed.  I have just thought alot more about the different situations.  I learned alot from the webinar but need to go back to clarify because it is new information.  I thought it interesting that what is created by a teacher can possibly belong to the district.

BETHANY MATKINS 3 years ago

1) What was your previous experience with copyright and intellectual property prior to the webinar? 

I have had no experience with copyright before this webinar.

2) How did you previously allow use of your intellectual property? 

I usually let anyone use anything with editing rights.

3) How has your thought process changed? Please reference both the webinar and the extra resource you looked at.

I think I would like to continue to share my documents but making it to where credit must be given.

JENNIFER ABERLY 3 years ago

1. Prior to participating in the webinar last week, I had no experience with copyright in regards to intellectual property. I did know that what you develop while working for your district could belong to the district.

2. I have freely shared my work with anyone that asked for it without any parameters.

3. I learned a lot from the webinar and went back to review it. It has made me realize that I may have used someone else's work in the past and violated copyright. Scary but the act certainly was not intentional.

I have no previous experience with copyright or intellectual property personally.  I know what they are and that is about the extent of it. When in the classroom, I knew to teach my students about it and how not to abuse a copyright because of plagerism.

I have always just shared with others anything that I created.  I was of the thought that we are in this together and we need to work together to share. This is still the same idea of this website, I just never thought to copyright my intellectual property.

It is changed because I realize that you are still sharing and supporting others with what you have created, but it is also important to claim what you have created. The idea of the Creative Commons licensing is a way to do that and it was new to me.

Jennifer Clark 3 years ago

1.  As an English teacher, I spent a fair amount of time discussing intellectual property and teaching students how to accurately cite sources. It is important that students are capable of giving credit to original sources prior to leaving high school.  

2.  I have always shared resources that I created without worry or expectation. 

3.  I don't know that my thought process has defintely changed, but the discussion about creating materials that belong to the district was interesting.  I hadn't really thought about that prior to the webinar.  

Aimee Wagner 3 years ago

I had very litte experience with copyright and intellectual property prior to the webinar. In the past, I have allowed free access to my intellectual property and gave permission to colleages to "trust" or "adjust" resource that I shared with them. My thought process regarding allowing use to my intellectual property was definintely challenged after listening to the webinar. I'm likely to start adding Creative Commons and non-commercial use to the resources that I develop. 

Casie Musgrave 3 years ago

I did not have a lot of experience with copyright and intellectual property prior the webinar. I teach my students about plagerism and citations but didn't really thing about it when working on lessons/getting resources. I usually share my resources/things I create pretty feely with coworkers. I also didn't realize that what you create could be seen as the districts if done while working for them. 

Kelly Jones 3 years ago

1. I had very little previous experience with copyright laws and intellectual property rights before the Webinar 1.

2. I have always shared my resources (first as a teacher and now as a BT coordinator). I feel that we are not in competition with each other and that if I have created a resource that can assit others, I want them to be able to have access to it!

3. I am now more aware of the copyright laws and I still feel strongly about sharing great resources with others. I liked the article on the mathematics classroom lesson framework. All of these things are for the greater good of our students!

T J Brinkman 3 years ago

1) What was your previous experience with copyright and intellectual property prior to the webinar? 

A brief lesson in a college class was the extent of my experience. 

2) How did you previously allow use of your intellectual property? 

I am unsure. 

3) How has your thought process changed? Please reference both the webinar and the extra resource you looked at.

I am more aware after the webinar to be looking for linking images and resources. I am also more curious about how copyright and sharing works. 

1) I have had a couple of PD on the correct use of materials found online as well as what was in my personal collections. 

2) I have always tried to leave everything open for others to use and copy anything I posted for access. I have never really been too concerned by people using my materials.

3) I would now ask that others cite my information when using my resources.  I still do not mind my stuff being used and cosumtized. 

 

Tyler Wilson 3 years ago

1) What was your previous experience with copyright and intellectual property prior to the webinar? 

A. My previous experience with copyright and intellectual property has been through school trainings and PDs

2) How did you previously allow use of your intellectual property? 

A. I shared my findings and materials within my PLC

3) How has your thought process changed? Please reference both the webinar and the extra resource you looked at.

A. After watching the webinar I will carefully share my resources but in the correct format.

Stacey Bush 3 years ago

I have had a "general" pd at our school about copyright and intellectual properties as well as a webinar provided by National AVID for when I write curriculum.  I like to share materials to help others to be as successful as possible, but really don't think too much about others using it and or how they use it.  During the webinar I really was thinking about the different information shared, especially whether or not a document could be altered.  I didn't even think about protecting that before but it makes sense to keep the integrity of the piece. 

ERIKA TYNDALL 3 years ago

1. Honestly, copyright is something I have not really discussed or been overly critical of since high school (aside from papers and sources).

2. Anything I have, I allow anyone to use if they want it. Even if I have purchased it from elsewhere.

3. I understand that sharing those things are sometimes forbidden so I feel I am more wary now of what and how to share. The webinar really opened my eyes as to what to look for as far as copyright goes. Remixing has now been added to my vocabulary and I am looking at doing that to things I use now.

DENISE SEARS 3 years ago

1. My experience with copyright and intellectual property was enhanced in a previous webinar (Curriculum and Review Academy). Prior to that webinar, I certainly did not realize all of the ways intellectual property could be coded and shared.

2. Previously if there was something I didn't want others to edit, I would create the file as a pdf. For other things I created, I shared freely for anyone to use however they desired.

3. I realize now in my role how important it is to allow users to modify (remix) the material to adjust what they need for their specfic group or classroom. I also was intrigued to find out that anything I created was actually property of my district. Moving forward i recognize the importance of correctly citing copyright/licensing on anything I create/use/distribute to other teachers. I plan to share the Creative Commons licensing descriptions with our staff.

KIRON SPENCER 3 years ago

 

1) Recently, I have worked to develop district-wide assessments for my school system, so understanding copyright has been key in requesting permissions to use content on the assessments.  Previously, as a teacher, I try to attribute credit to the originator of a resource, but I was probably less likely to do that if I remixed the resource.

2) As a classroom teacher, I never included information about how I expected my work to be used.  I don't know that I felt there was a need because I wanted to share freely with my colleagues. 

3) Recently I have conversations with colleagues about how school districts often experience litigation over copyright violations.  As an educator it's easy to believe that copyright is not important, but in our ever-evolving digital society, understanding is essential.  The explanation of ways to share in the webinar was insightful, especially as I begin to engaged with a commons community. I watched the Creative Commons, “About the Licenses.” It was really helpful in providing more specific information about the purpose and use of creative commons.

PAMELA SUTTON 3 years ago

My previous experience with copyright and intellectualy property prior to the webinar was limited and honestly it's been quite some time since it has been a topic in my district. Many years ago we had some teachers in our district got some "attention" for airing movies over schoolwide platforms. 

In the past, I have created a multitude of materials for my grade level to use as instructional resources and even some of the forms we use school wide. However, I just created them and shared them through email or Google drive.

My thought process has changed not as much as my willingness to share but how I would share items in the future especially in regards to such a large platform like this. While my focus is always the students in our classroom and how they can benefit, I would not necessarily want someone to take my work that I willingly share and use it to make money...something to think about moving forward.

 

DaQuita Pounds 3 years ago

1) I did not have much experience with copyright and intellectual property prior to the webinar. 

2) Most of my intellectual property is housed in Google Drive, so I would determine who else had access, whether that was editing, viewing, or commenting rights (or no rights at all).

3) After this webinar, I am considering classifying my personal materials with the Creative Commons license.  I don't mind if others use or adapt it, but I would appreciate the credit for it. 

MICHELE HICKS 2 years, 11 months ago

1) My previous experience with copyright and intellectual property has been trainings provided by Media Specialists.

2) I have shared information with my colleagues.

3) My thought process changed a bit. I share information with colleagues; however, I do not like the idea of someone making a profit off of my work/ideas.