Reflect and engage (Answer Required, from Webinar 1)

by Joanna Schimizzi 5 years ago

Answer in paragraph, bullet or any way, but answer all three parts!

 

1) What was your experience with copyright and intellectual property prior to tonight's webinar? 

2) How did you previously allow use of your intellectual property? 

3) How has your thought process changed? Please reference both the webinar and the extra resource you looked at.


 

1) Prior to tonight, I had a LOT of training on copyright from NCVPS, but I always value learning more about how the CC licenses can encourage collaboration. The game was new to me for the webinar. :)

 

2) Previously I shared my work openly and widely, but I never put a copyright or any licensing on my work so that educators knew the terms of use. 

 

3) Thinking about copyright tonight and talking with everyone on the webinar made me realize for the first time that the license on a work can actually encourage or discourage collaboration. I never really thought of the strong message that is sent through the presence or absence of a license. I really love the video and how it invites us to all collaborate together.

Sheronica Sharp 5 years ago

1) What was your experience with copyright and intellectual property prior to tonight's webinar? 

I've learned about copyright previously, but in no way am I an expert.  I have a lot to learn.  

 

2) How did you previously allow use of your intellectual property? 

I pretty much share what I create without requiring "credit" to be given.  Thinking about what I have learned so far, maybe I should require "credit" to be given.  

 

3) How has your thought process changed? Please reference both the webinar and the extra resource you looked at.

Thinking about what I learned tonight and the informaiton on the OER Commons, it may be better for me to copyright what I create.  I definitely need to be mindful of how I use resources and I need to make sure I am using them correctly, while giving credit to the author.  

 

Carrie Jones 4 years, 11 months ago

1) What was your experience with copyright and intellectual property prior to tonight's webinar? 

NCVPS Training

2) How did you previously allow use of your intellectual property? 

Within school, sometimes presentations, sometimes signed waivers if I was being paid (NCVPS course...competition writing questions....)

3) How has your thought process changed? Please reference both the webinar and the extra resource you looked at.

There are many different ways to maintain control of one's work, even after sharing and putting it "out there."

Amber Batchelor 5 years ago

1. I have had tons of training with NCVPS for licensing within the past year. I didn't know how technical it all was so I have definitely become more aware of how to cite images mostly for anything I use. 

 

2. I usually just share with my co-workers through email or canvas. I didn't really care if they edit it or not because I never wanted to make money off anything i created, which is rare anyway. I mostly just try to find things and tweak it for my kids. 

 

3. We should always be aware of where things come from by citing our resources we make/use. We need to know are we properly using it in the way the creator intended it. I never knew if I altered it like through screen shots or reformatting in word that I might be going against the creator if they intended their product to stay the same. So I will definitely become more mindful of that. 

RENEE PEOPLES 4 years, 11 months ago

Even though you didn't want to make money off it, have you ever had them share it or use your work to make a profit? That seems like something that could happen.

ALICIA RAY 5 years ago

1. My experience in both graduate programs gave me a solid background in copyright prior to tonight. I've also been to the initial GoOpenNC training, so I had heard a majority of tonight's webinar in person.

2. I only recently started CC licensing my work. I've always been open to sharing what I create though.

3. I'm more excited about GoOpenNC after seeing 135 folks join the conversation tonight. I initially was worried about the buy-in, and it's looking like it will be a great resource for educators.

1. Prior to tonight's webinar, I knew how to find images with the cc designation and articles, but I did not know the meanings of the differents attributions. I had learned about cc during an introduction to the library for new teachers I attended when I switched counties. There is also a module which provides an overview of copyright law on canvas, and teachers are required to complete the module at the beginning of each year. I was familiar with MLA and APA citations because I teach those to my students and include citations in my own work. 

2. I just emailed information or shared via google documents.

3. There is definitely a need for more instruction on copyright information. A repository of information is so beneficial for teachers, administrators, curriculum reviewers, etc. because everyone is able to work together and share resources to benefit all. All too often teachers feel they need to create something new, but there is a wealth of information available (around the globe) which can, and should, be utilized. By working together, students have more opportunities. I never thought about placing a license on my materials because teachers work so much together. We all contribute to the field of education, and the blogs emphasize the far reaches of collaboration. 

1.  Prior to tonight's webinar, I had been "trained" on copyright and intellectual property at a staff development where we watched a video, which included information about creative commons copyright, and talked briefly about the use of copyright materials.  

2.  I have always shared anything that I have created with other teachers that I know.

3.  The thought that stood out the most is that I need to change the way I use materials!  But I think the information from the webinar and the creative commons website was so helpful to learn and review--and from looking at the creative commons website, adding a license to your work is very easy to do.

LISA MONTGOMERY 4 years, 11 months ago

I agree, Jennifer! I enjoyed the review and believe Creative Commons makes this easy! Happy you are in this group!

Chavonda Brown 5 years ago

1)  I just completed coursework for the NCVPS Teacher in Training, Spring 2019.  One of the lessons discussed copyright, specifically using resources from Creative Commons or Pixabay when citing images or pictures.  The lesson also referenced a video similar to the webinar that discussed various copyrights and their meanings.

2) I've never used a copyright on any of my work.  I place any lessons or materials I create in Google Drive and share them with my school colleagues to use as needed.

3) I use many online resources, since I teach mutiple grade levels at once.  Very seldom do I take the time to credit the resource.  After the webinar and reminding myself of a previous video I watched on copyright, I need to begin attributing all resources that I use.  Just like in the webinar, I need to determine the copyright license from the website I am obtaining the resource.  Then, I need to provide an attribute on each resource.  I may need to think about using a copyright for my own material also that can be used by anyone, as noted in the webinar.      

Melissa Edgerton 4 years, 11 months ago

I'm like you. I need to do a better job of attributing my resources as well as using a copyright for my own material. 

SAMANTHA ROUSE 5 years ago

1) I have lots of training on copyright, thanks to NCVPS.  It was hard for me to understand in the beginning, but I completely see the value of it now.

2) I create a lot of stuff on Canva for my OCS English classes and share it via the NCVPS OCS English Google Drive Collaboration folders.  We have a HUGE community of "sharers" over there!  As far as my F2F job, I feel like I am a pro at creating resources as well as finding them for my fellow teachers. I usually share via email or on Google Drive.  

3) When I create for NCVPS, I usually just put "Created by Samantha Rouse using _______; free to use or share" on the image/infographic.  I was really intrigued to learn about how the code for the CC license "image" is written so that it is searchable.  I think I will start trying to incorporate the actual Creative Commons license image into my work.

Danielle Flores 5 years ago

Hi Samantha! I would like to start incorporating the actual CC lincense image as well. :) I also work for NCVPS and agree they have taught us a lot about copyright. 

Lisa Ragland 4 years, 11 months ago

Agree, Samantha! Same! I have always put, "Created by NCVPS teacher." I do know that what we create and use in our NCVPS courses becomes the property of NCVPS (if we are in development?). I wonder if the lines get blurry here with what we own versus what we don't.

Danielle Flores 5 years ago

1.  I have learned a lot about copyright by working with NCVPS.  I am not an expert, but I feel like I have more knowledge than some teachers because of the training through NCVPS.  

2.  I have never put any type of licensing code on my property.  I just let people use my stuff! I have never cared if they copied it or remixed it. However, I would like to be able to get credit for my stuff, so I am going to start doing CC BY. 

3. I would like to receive credit for my work, so I am going to start using CC BY.  I think that is a great thing for all teachers to start doing. I really liked the #rejectpdf tag line! :) 

Renee Golz 5 years ago
  1. Prior to this evening's webinar I had heard of Creative Commons and was aware of the concept of intellectual property.  I have seen very few notations on the work of others, but have seen a few.  My experience is developing.  I look forward to achieving proficiency through participation in this group.
  2. I am very generous with the use of my intellectual property.  I am of the mindset that anything I create is property of my district.  Furthermore, I believe that as educators we empower one another through sharing our best resources.  
  3. While I have always respected the work that educators do, tonights webinar and the resources I previewed reminded me that a great deal of time, expertise, and pride go into the creation of materials.  Where as before I saw licensing intellectual property to be synonimus with ego, I can appreciate the objective being to promote the intent of the design and intended use.  Perhaps licensing can further promote the profession by displaying/highlighting the expertise all educators have.
Rebecca Welch 5 years ago

Hey Renee!

As I'm having teachers work on content materials for sharing this upcoming school year, I am considering how to have the discussion with them about licensing and how they should give themselves the credit they deserve.  Our teachers work hard!  I also sort of saw it as synonymous with ego, but now that thinking is changing for me.

Amanda Twisdale 5 years ago

1.  I was aware of copyright and unaware of intellectual property.  I think it is important to give credit where credit is due and love the idea of CC licenses allows that to happen among educators.

 

2.  I have always shared my work openly and never thought to use any type of copyright.

 

3.  My thought process has changed by allowing my eyes to be opened to a new idea of considering the licensing of the source and how it can be used.  For example, in the game featured on the presentation it was clear of the different types of licensing and which one fits the source. Also, it was interesting that on some sites such as Tools for NC Teachers there isn't a license visible.  The Commons Deed was mentioned in the article, and I liked the concept of having this in user friendly terms for eduactors among many others.

Dawn Perez 4 years, 11 months ago

I agree with the idea that it is especially helpful to have the copyright easily found and in user-friendly terms.  Since the idea of open licensed resources is to provide teachers the opportunity to easily access materials, this seems like an essential element.

Allison Landry 5 years ago

1. I have worked with copyright throughout my educational career, especially within the past 10 years.  I had not heard about Creative Commons until tonight's webinar. 

2.  I have always shared my intellectual property through open with state and district colleagues. I have never used copyright licenses while sharing on the school system's platforms. 

3.  I really liked how Joanna repeated, "Once you've seen it, you can't "not" see it."  It's just about raising awareness and being proactive with sharing my intellectual property and helping others do the same.  The webinar and additional information has made me aware of the six different licenses and how they really impact the usage.  

Ben Owens 5 years ago

Great comments and perspective, Allison! I appreciate the fact that you have been willing to share your work with your colleagues in the past. This effort should provide a more formal way to make that a standard practice for all educators - something that will help us all improve! By the way, I'm one of the "Super Community Members" for this work and have been assigned to your cohort. Please reach out to me if you have any questions or just want to bounce ideas off of someone. Cheers!

VICTORIA WATSON 5 years ago

1. Prior to tonight's webinar, I feel I had a typical classroom teacher's experience with copyright/intellectual property. Sometimes I intentionally misused copyright material and other times I did so out of ignorance. 

2. I make about $100 a month (during the school year) on teachers pay teachers and I share my resources with my collegues. It is important to me that materials (particular multiple choice question quizzes) are recognized as my own intellectual property because they generate revenue for me. 

3) I understand more of the specific terms for copyright than I did previously. I viewed an extra resource called "Teaching the Kite Runner with the New York Times" that sent me to a specific link but required a NY times account. My questions are if (or when) teachers are creating resources for this platform -- is someone reviewing them to ensure they follow the copyright standards we are learning about? 

Ben Owens 5 years ago

Hi, Victoria! Thanks for the question...I'm one of the "Super Community Members" for this work and have been assigned to your cohort, so I'll take a stab at it: A key element of this approach is that rather than having an official body such as DPI formally review each item, the "crowd" does the review and vetting and then rates each item in terms of its quality and alignment to standards. This is especially true with this phase of the work, where you and other members of this GoOpenNC team will be curating, vetting, and providing practical feedback on items specific to your area of expertise. Of course in that process, one will also be careful to note how the resource is set up in terms of use (can it be remixed, for example), but also how it is setup in terms of compliance with copyright, etc. As a user of oercommons.org for years, for example, I tended to downrate items that set teachers up for failure by expecting them to go past a paywall to gain full access to materials for their classroom (or violate copyright). Does that make sense? Please reach out to me if you have any other questions or just want to bounce ideas off of someone. Cheers!

VICTORIA WATSON 5 years ago

So what is the recourse other than a low-star view for items posted that are copyright violations? Is there a "report" button etc? Moving away from the negative -- what about resources that take you to links that are expired? Just wondering how to ensure the platform is as reliable as possible for teachers. 

Ben Owens 4 years, 11 months ago

Good question! Apart from the low rating and comments the reviewing teacher provides, there are really none. I suppose if someone wants to continue to violate copyright (or the cc protocols for that matter), they can continue to do so. This process at least makes sure that they are aware that they have posted a resource that can't really be shared the way it was written. Ideally, based on that feedback, the author will go back and modify or remove the item to make it better - obviously our goal as we work to ensure high quality resources are freely accessible to teachers across the state. The same process also applies to dead links - that's one of the comments I use the most on oercommons.org! Again, that should prompt the author to go back and fix the link or remove the item from the platform. In both cases, we're using the power of crowdsourcing - just like you may do now with Yelp, 4Square, Airbnb, Waze, etc. Hopethat helps!

MARINA BONOMO 4 years, 11 months ago

Thanks, I had wondered about that too! I appreciate the clarification!

LISA MONTGOMERY 5 years ago

1, Prior to tonight I have worked (and still do) for ten years as an instructional technology facilitator. I have had a good deal of experience with copyright.

2. I have always been open to sharing my work and letting users modify, share, re-invent. :) I will start being more consistent with adding cc.

3. I was refreshed to find you so open to sharing Joanna!! Sometimes we  can be territorial in education due to comparions with testing. This stifles growth in my opinon. So I was happy to hear you encourage us to share with little contraints!

LISA MONTGOMERY 5 years ago

1, Prior to tonight I have worked (and still do) for ten years as an instructional technology facilitator. I have had a good deal of experience with copyright.

2. I have always been open to sharing my work and letting users modify, share, re-invent. :) I will start being more consistent with adding cc.

3. I was refreshed to find you so open to sharing Joanna!! Sometimes we can be territorial in education due to comparisons with testing. This stifles growth in my opinion. So I was happy to hear you encourage us to share with little constraints!

1) Prior to the webinar, I knew about copyright and what to share/what not to share. I'll admit: I used to be the teacher who would "accidentally" not see the copyright line at the bottom of a worksheet. Now I discuss copyright with teachers when they post things on webpages and create things for school use.

2) Previously, I would create something in Google Docs and make it View Only. I've never thought about adding copyright to what I make! 

3) I love that OER's are becoming more and more popular! I've given a few workshops about OER's. After reading HERE, I'm now thinking that I need to add the Copyright game that we saw during the webinar and focus a bit more on copyright. 

Grace Jackson 5 years ago

Like Amber, I also am lucky to work with NCVPS. Because of the nature of our platform, we have been trained a lot in how to use copyright compliant images. We tended to focus on image use, as I am in OCS where we need to consider access in a variety of methods.

However, I have not had extensive practice reviewing all the types of CC licenses. Generally, I create my own work, and prefer to use PLT created resources when possible. Our PDP last year involved creating a library of shared resources using Google folders. I did not register my work/ideas beyond the scope of our school. 

I can really see the need for shared resources more broadly. I was just discussing with a colleague how competitive our educational environment can feel, and I mourn the lack of collaboration. I am eager to be a part of a movment to change that. When I looked at the collection (on my phone, so limited view?) I only saw 3 English sources, and they were designed for younger students. Since the webinar, though, I will have to consider which of my plans were not influenced by outside, web based property that may not be used by all. I am curious about why someone would create a "SA" resource as well, and will explore that further.

Melissa Barnhart 4 years, 11 months ago

Hey Grace!   I work for NCVPS too!   What do you teach? I teach OCS Math 1 and LDME (Locally Developed Math Elective) and Intervention Math 1 & Math 2.  

I 100% agree that thanks to NCVPS I know a lot more about copyright than I ever did while in the classroom. 

LINDA NELSON 5 years ago

1) What was your experience with copyright and intellectual property prior to tonight's webinar? 

I have had some training regarding copyright and intellectual property, but not as indepth as this webinar.

2) How did you previously allow use of your intellectual property? 

I would share Google Docs, but make them view only (but others can still copy it). I recently started adding the Creative Commons license to my documents.

3) How has your thought process changed? Please reference both the webinar and the extra resource you looked at.

I really need to start protecting my intellectual property! Until reading and reviewing the Creative Commons webiste and attending this webinar, I didn't really think that it was really that big of a deal.

Nancy Hetrick 5 years ago

1.  As other NCVPS colleagues have shared, we've all been trained in copyright compliance, especially on making sure I only use resources that are public domain or I have permission to use.

2. Other than adding "Created by *my name* [possibly adding what tool I used to create]", I honestly never gave much thought about "allowing" use of my intellectual property.

3.  The first webinar on OER, along with watching the video types of creative common licenses, really helps me look at copyright in more of a positive way. My focus will continue to make sure my work is copyright compliant; however, I am now encouraged to broaden by perspective and knowledge on how I will share my own work and how I use the works of others.

I love your take away on this Nancy!  I am in the same boat as far as not having thought of labeling anything I created to indicate it was okay to use.   

I love the idea of starting to add something to my own work for that, but I wonder how that would apply to tools, since we are using a program to create but we are providing the "input" I am not sure how to navigate that...

1) What was your experience with copyright and intellectual property prior to tonight's webinar? 

 Beofre tonighti only had experince with copyright and intectual property through information given from my school.  I wasn't really clear on how it all played our and worked. 

2) How did you previously allow use of your intellectual property? 

I am a big team player and share whatever I find useful or create with my team.  I am not looking for credit for anything I share, I just want to help others. 

3) How has your thought process changed? Please reference both the webinar and the extra resource you looked at.

I am much more aware of looking for copyright and how I use items now.  I am exctied to have a great resource I didn't know about at my fingertips to collaborate with others!

Julie Joyner 5 years ago

Kimberly, sometimes you really have to search through a website to find the use policy. I like the symbols on the Creative Commons website that will make it easy for anyone to understand copyrights that we put on work. 

Kristen Fox 5 years ago

1) What was your prior experience? 

I have never received any formal training on copyright, and I have been with my district for 20 years.  I write a lot of the content I teach, and I am so happy to see a common language for sharing material and an easy way to get these questions answered.

2) How did you previously allow use of your intellectual property? 

I have never copyrighted any of my lessons or strategies. I am happy to share whatever I make in a way that can be used and revised by any teacher. 

3) How has your thought process changed

I believe this job can be too hard NOT to openly  share curriculum with other teachers. And I do get grumpy about the idea of other people making money from another teacher’s work, but I never considered tutoring and private schools in that equation.  I really appreciated that perspective. I LOVE that the default position of this initiative is that we should be sharing in a way that can be adapted for the students sitting in the room. Excited to be a part of it!

Julie Joyner 5 years ago

Kristin, I am so on board with your answer to #3. Sharing makes life easier with all of us! I think I will start putting a copyright on my work so that teachers now that they can edit and share, but not distribute to make money. Sharing is caring, right? :)

Rebecca Welch 5 years ago

When I first came on board in our district, I had a hard time with other teachers NOT sharing materials.  I was a brand new teacher who had to create all of my materials from scratch.  I since learned that this isn't necessarily the norm in all schools, but in places where it is or where a PLC is made up of one teacher having a place to find materials that are openly licensed through CC is imperative!

AMY JAMISON 5 years ago

1) What was your experience with copyright and intellectual property prior to tonight's webinar?  I have very little experience with copyright and intellectual property.

2) How did you previously allow the use of your intellectual property? The few items I have created are free for the taking and have shared with teammates over the years. 

3) How has your thought process changed? Please reference both the webinar and the extra resource you looked at. I thought the information on copyright was very eye-opening. I need to be more cognizant of the copyright of the materials I purchase. It clearly is a very serious issue.

As far as materials I create, they would be open to anyone to use anyhow they see fit. 

Hey Amy :)   

I think I was in the very same boat as you regarding having little experience with copyright for the majority of my teaching career.  It wasn't until I worked online that I started learning about it and the more I learn, the more I realized how little we were free to use!  

I am so excited to be a part of this community where we will be able to share so much!

MEGAN LEWIS 5 years ago

1) Before last night's webinar, I did not know a lot about copyright and intellectual property. I would notice when materials purchased for my school had the "no copying" statement on them (and would notice when people would copy them anyway...eek!!). I also try to avoid TPT, but when I am on there I have noticed statements like "This is licensed under Creative Commons, etc. etc.". I never knew what it meant though!

2) I never really thought about how others used my intellectual property. I make a lot of things for math on Google slides and share them widely with my colleagues in my district. People could make copies and make changes (and I'm assuming they did)!

3) I see now the value of understanding copyright and using it ethically. I have been approached by colleagues and administrators before encouraging illegal copying of materials (and after reading the HISD news article, I could absolutely see that happening at my previous school, yikes!). I really enjoyed doing the quiz where I selected the license based on the description. It really opened up my eyes to all of the different ways copyrights can exist. I personally have never actually cared about getting "credit" for things I've personally created -- I usually just share through Google Slides and never think about it again -- but I am open to changing my mind about why it does matter.

Ben Owens 5 years ago

Great comments and perspective, Megan! Clearly from reading this thread, you are not alone in terms of awareness of copyright and creative commons. The thing I love, however, is not only your prior experience of sharing resources, but your willingness to champion that approach with your colleagues. This effort should provide you a way to model that with your peers - locally and across the state! By the way, I'm one of the "Super Community Members" for this work and have been assigned to your cohort. Please reach out to me if you have any questions or just want to bounce ideas off of someone. Cheers!

Martha Levey 5 years ago

1. I was a journalism major (undergrad) a long time ago so I've always been aware of it's importance. Sharpened my knowledge in MLS school about 8 years ago. I worked with Donna and Joanna on GoOpenNC this spring so I'm continuing my education. I'm also taking CC course this summer. So much to learn but it's a very positive, supportive learning atmosphere.

2. Previously, I never thought about it. I would present or teach and not consider how, or if, my work was being used.

3. My thought process is constantly changing. Like Joanna says, once you know something, you can't unknow it. I've had the pleasure of seeing parts of the webinar in person as well but I always enjoy hearing about the global community of people willing to create and share. I also enjoyed the game. That was new for me. Here is a resource I've started using for photos. https://unsplash.com/

 

MICHELLE MANIS 5 years ago
  1. Prior to tonight's webinar, my copyright experience was very minimal.  We have typical PD on copyright use and viewing in the school but nothing beyond that.
  2. I openly share my work with no citations or "giving credit"
  3. I had to ah-ahs from tonight's webinar.  First, teachers might be more open to sharing if their work is cited. Second, I like the "NO PDF rule" (but still give credit).  There should always be an opportunity to differentiate(sorry, not a "re" word LOL)
Jessica Field 5 years ago

1) What was your experience with copyright and intellectual property prior to tonight's webinar? I used/cited sources appropriately in order to give respect to authors of content that I found useful and helpful to meet my student's needs. 

2) How did you previously allow use of your intellectual property? Free reign; as long as my information helps other students I do not care how it is used. 

3) How has your thought process changed? Please reference both the webinar and the extra resource you looked at. I still feel like it is important to allow teachers to use what they find to meet their own student's needs, (Webinar) but recognize the importance of giving myself (and other authors) credit for their work. (OER Commons)

JAMIE SMITH 5 years ago

1. I have written courses through NCVPS and UNCW so I am very familiar with copyright and IP info, although I think every time I look at it I am refreshed!

2.  Since I am an instructional coach all of my work is open access for those in my district.

3.  Since the webinar, I have thought about adding my name to my work so that I am credited and since the video, I want to advise teacher I work with that share resources to consider copyright and IP info.

 

Rebecca Welch 5 years ago

IP info isn't something I ever considered before.  That's something I'm quite curious about.  Since you have work you have created for your district, have you labeled it CC already?  Is that something you knew to do from NCVPS?  Or do you have it accessible for others with the assumed allowance of use?  I have a lot available to my teachers that I have not given the creative commons label to - I think I'll go back and do that.

Julie Joyner 5 years ago

1. Prior to the webinar, my experience with copyright & intellectual property was from school-based PD's given by our media specialist, and then from Josten's, as I was the yearbook teacher. I learned a lot through Josten's, but just like the PD's, it was about how to use copyrighted materials, not how to copyright my own intellectual property. I found the webinar very interesting!

2. I have always just shared my materials without thinking much about copyright. Other teachers were so gracious when I started teaching, and I want to do the same.

3. I really do like the idea of putting a caveat on my materials that says no one else can make money off of my work, and I like the share alike button as well, so that the work is sort of protected in a way that it will be given freely to other teachers throughout the country and across time.

 

BARBARA SINK 5 years ago

I am also a musician and am always conscious of copyright. But in teaching math I don't think of it as much as taking someone's tune or musical composition. This is so important! To give credit where it's due or to not use someone else's work as your own. I've never put anything in print that was my own, but I am always willing to share ideas with colleagues. I will now think of things that I get off the internet differently. Looking for cc and definitely posting cc on any papers, pictures, or information that I download.  

JAMIE MILES 5 years ago

1) What was your experience with copyright and intellectual property prior to tonight's webinar? 

Prior to last night's webinar, I didn't have much knowledge about copyright and intellectual property.  I knew how to find free-use images and content, but I had not heard of CC licenses.  

2) How did you previously allow use of your intellectual property? 

Previously, I shared my work with colleagues via email or Google Drive.  I put a copyright signature on my TpT items.

3) How has your thought process changed? Please reference both the webinar and the extra resource you looked at.

I didn't think much about making and distributing copies (copyrights from Newsela and Brain Pop really surprised me).  While reading through the CC blog posts I realized that CC licensing is not just a movement in the US.  It's a worldwide movement which will encourage teachers from different countries to collaborate and redesign (legally).

1.  I remember having a discussion at an opening district PD about copyright about 15 years ago.  Since then, nothing has really been stated about the issues.  I do know that teachers have gotten in trouble for linking things to their webpage that was either a paid subscription or a secure item that was not to be posted. 

2. I have always just given what I have had freely without any hesitation to alter or use how they see fit.

3. I would really like to look into this more.  I think I will be a bit more respectful of putting the proper acknowledgement (I usually do, but sometimes it gets lost in an alteration. I also think this will maybe deter teachers from sharing though without the ability to get paid.  I'm thinking this is why TpT is even a thing.  Why not just openly share?

Ben Owens 5 years ago

Thanks, Jamie, for the feedback! I particularly appreciate your last point - this is indeed a worldwide movement! in fact, I'm doing some work through Red Hat (open source software company based in Raleigh that was just bought by IBM) that involves a group of educators from all over the planet discussing how to bring more opes principles into our education systems. Cool stuff! That's why I'm so amped to have teachers like yourself here in North Carolina leading the way in the GoOpen movement! By the way, I'm one of the "Super Community Members" for this work and have been assigned to your cohort. Please reach out to me if you have any questions or just want to bounce ideas off of someone. Cheers!

  1. As a School Library Media Coordinator, I'm very familiar with copyright and intellectual property. I've been interested in and appreciative of Creative Commons licensing for a long time. One practical area I've explored a lot are sources of images and clipart that students and teachers can use because of their licensing.
  2. When I create a presentation or informative newsletter, I often share it freely through Google's sharing options, making it publicly available. And when I share with district SLMCs, I tell them they are welcome to reuse and remix. However, I have not explicitly added a CC license.
  3. I have often been frustrated by websites and resources that don't make permissions explicit, but I have done the same thing in my own work. Listening to Joanna talk about making sure that we are explicit about how others can use our work made me recognize this failing.
  4. I read the Creative Commons blog post about the Global Summit in May. I found it interesting that the conversations about diversity and inclusion that I see everywhere are also showing up in this context. It made me think that we need to make sure that the GoOpenNC resources and community are diverse and inclusive!

1) What was your experience with copyright and intellectual property prior to tonight's webinar? 

Before the first webinar I had completed a copyright course with NCVPS.  I have also viewed several additional resources to learn more about it because I work as an Instructional Leader and as a Strategic Support Instructional Leader I would have not just teachers but the Instructional Leaders of teachers who asked them questions come to me for help in determining if something was okay or not.   I am by no means an expert at all, but I have spent a reasonable amount time at least attempting to learn about copyright :)  I will admit though, the legalese still gets me! 

2) How did you previously allow use of your intellectual property? 

Previously, I have always been a producer and sharer of content.  I would create note guides, quizzes, resources, videos, web tools, you name it!  I enjoyed the process and felt satisfaction in knowing that something was Just how I wanted it to be to fit what I believed was best for my students.  I have always shared what I created because I thought of it as an investment.  I invested my time and effort into creating it & there is no better return on this kind of investment than knowing it is being used and is helpful for someone, somewhere.  I will also say though, it has bothered me when I wasn't given credit for something.  I guess I don't mind sharing at all as long as I get that "thanks" or "pat on the back" for helping save someone some time and effort.  

3) How has your thought process changed? Please reference both the webinar and the extra resource you looked at.

I think my thought process has changed from when I was in the classroom in that I think I felt like I had to make everything myself.  I am just now getting comfortable using other people's things and giving them credit for their good work.  For some reason I think I had it in my mind that if I had to use someone else's things I wasn't working hard enough or should work toward creating everything myself as the final goal.  I am seeing now that if we all do that, there is a whole lot  of duplicated work that is going to be quite unnecessary.  Also in watching the video on the CC site and reading a few things there I am realizing that I should start actually LABELING items I create to indicate that I am okay with others using it.  

Jenny Conrad 5 years ago

1. I was aware of copyright before tonight's session, but I didn't know that there were several different layers and distinctions within the copyright of intellectual property. I talked with students and teachers about copyright information in several trainings.

2. I shared lots of information with different teachers openly. I have a few items for sale on Teachers Pay Teachers.

3. I really like the idea of being able to share things in the way in which you want them shared. Teachers spend so much time recreating things that could easily be adapted from someone else if they allowed. I like that you have control over the work that you put out there in some ways. 

Morgan Reece 5 years ago

1) What was your experience with copyright and intellectual property prior to tonight's webinar? 

Prior to tonight, I had official learning of copyright through my Library Science degree and continue to reivew various resources through my professional interest over the years as I have supported teachers and other media coordinators. I have seen many infractions, but also guilty of a few - as I fall into the 'I'm doing it for educattion!" excuse without researching the details of a Fair Use of a product as well as possible.  I have grown from those early days and make sure to give credit and review copyright before use now.

2) How did you previously allow use of your intellectual property? 

I have been pretty open with my intellectual property in the past.  When I was a media coordinator, I usually created my lessons and resources and compliled them in notebooks.  Many times, especially as I moved to a district leadership position, I would share them. either my photocopying and handing lessons to a brand new teacher to assist their first days, or posting for an entire team to access and use as they needed.  It wasn't officially a CC at all - just a - edit as you need! Please use it to help you! This was before Teachers-pay-Teachers (or, I just didn't know about it yet!)

3) How has your thought process changed? Please reference both the webinar and the extra resource you looked at.  I like this idea of getting credit or even making some extra income by selling TPT.  However, I have always been mostly for sharing with other teachers, as a lot of my creations were 'remixes' of others and I never felt that I should CC a remix.  I think it may be good as it was changed more and more to meet the needs of a different learning environment.

Julie Joyner 5 years ago

Morgan, would you say the Creative Commons licenses are different than what you’ve worked with in the past? I feel like they are very different, but much easier to understand than the legal speak you find on website use statements.

Cinnamon Frame 5 years ago

1) NCVPS trains its teachers and developers really well on copyright and I had a fabuolous media coordinator my first few years of teaching who was a real pro on leading staff development on copyright and fair use.

2) I have always shared my work openly with other and it really didn't occur to me to put a CC license on it. I developed conrtent to share out for my county when I worked for Johnston County Schools, and anything I develop under contract for NCVPS or Quest is owned by them, becuasue they paid me to create it.

3) It makes sense to label things I develop for my classroom use as CC BY because them people who get ahold of it know they are free to use it or modify it. When you use the advanced search on Google to look for CC licensed materials, often not a lot shows up. I feel like perhaps, that just because people didn't think about adding the license, not because they didn't want to share it. 

CARLA JOYNER 5 years ago

1) Prior to last night's webinar, I had a lot of experience with copyright and intellectual property from Digital Learning PD that I completed last year.

2) I have always allowed anyone to use items that I create.

3) I have always felt that if we are all in this together, why not allow everyone to use valuable resources. I plan to continue to share as much as I can.

CARLA JOYNER 5 years ago

1) Prior to last night's webinar, I had a lot of experience with copyright and intellectual property from Digital Learning PD that I completed last year.

2) I have always allowed anyone to use items that I create.

3) I have always felt that if we are all in this together, why not allow everyone to use valuable resources. I plan to continue to share as much as I can.

Hey Carla!  I love that you have always shared what you create!  I have always been a person who creates and shares too.  I always felt like it made it even more worth my time knowing that I was helping more students, and saving another teacher time and energy.

BETH ELMORE 5 years ago

1. My first exposure was at ISTE in Atlanta several years ago when I attend a Creative Commons session.  Copyright and intellectual property resurfaced when I taught a Coding Class during the 2017-2018 school year. There is a great lesson in the Code.org curriculum.

2.  I have never labeled any of my intellectual property!

3.  There is a need for education on copyright and intellectual property.  It was hard to teach to middle school students but I did have some that always included attribution in their work!  I still have lots to learn too!

Katelyn Jones 5 years ago

1) During my graduate year for my MAT, I took a technology related class where we talked about copyright and fair use....but honestly, I had forgotten a lot of that information. However, my district has a digital learning course taught/facilitied by a technology guru so us teachers have been continually informed about copyright and intellectual property.

 

2) I feel like I have this tug-of-war type of battle. On one hand, I have the mentality of "I created this. This is MINE. No one can have this unless they buy it (TpT). I've put so much effort into making this; I don't want to just give it away for free." BUT on the other hand, I know how long it takes to create materials and I know when I find material that allows for others to use without paying for it, what a huge relief it is for me as a teacher. Now my time can be spent on something else instead of recreating the same resource or purchasing the resource using my own money.

 

3) After last night's webinar, I have COMPLETELY changed my mentality on copyright. I think I had it stuck in my head that either A) no one could use your materials unless they had your permission, or B) no one could use your materials unless they purchased a license from you (from places like TpT). After the talk last night about the different types of CC, I know there is a lot more flexibiltiy and I am in control of how exactly I want my resources to be used. There is no guessing game anymore of can I use it, is this legal, can I get my district in trouble if I duplicate this, etc. The resource I looked at on CC's website was titled "Congratulations to the new 62 CC Certificate Graduates and 7 Facilitators!" Here I got to learn a little more about the opportunity CC gives educators and other to learn more about copyright and licensing. They offer both a 10-week course and a week long intensive course where participants get to really delve into various aspects of CC. 

Hey Katelyn :) 

I understand your tug-of-war feeling about creating resources. I think a lot of us "creaters" have them.  I have always been a "creater" of resources, even if what I was creating was a compilation of questions I got from one place or another I was always a bit like "but that took me HOURS" when I thought about sharing it.   I guess what ended-up making me feel better about it was that I knew I had put so many hours into it.  If I was the only teacher to use it that meant it benefitted fewer students.   In the end I felt like I was getting a better return on my investment of time when I shared it.   

Sandra McAuley 5 years ago

1) What was your experience with copyright and intellectual property prior to tonight's webinar? 

I have had copyright training with my district and during my time with NCVPS, but the webinar was very clear and helpful.  I liked the game a lot to help clarify. 

2) How did you previously allow use of your intellectual property? 

I have always shared my property but never asked for credit.  I probably should have. 

3) How has your thought process changed? Please reference both the webinar and the extra resource you looked at.

Between the webinar and the other resources, I didn't think about how the actual depth of what 'widely share' means.  I think that allowing others worldwide to have access to resources can only help to strengthen what we do everyday as teachers. 

Patricia Lipsey 5 years ago

1) What was your experience with copyright and intellectual property prior to tonight's webinar? 

NCVPS trains us well about copyright. The first PD that I had when I joined NCVPS in 2008 was on copyright and I have had several since.  

2) How did you previously allow use of your intellectual property?

 I gave my material to others either on paper or sent by email   I also participated in some share documents that my colleagues and I put together. 

3) How has your thought process changed? Please reference both the webinar and the extra resource you looked at.

 

The webinare really helped me to understand Creative Commons better. I was aware that CC was the place to go for shareable material and that there were different levels but did not totally understand the process.  The article in the ¨homework¨ by CC on how they developed and work - which I printed-  was especialy helpful and will be a great resource 

 

I looked at the GoNC resource https://goopennc.oercommons.org/courses/el-sabor-del-caribe-a-taste-of-the-caribbean

 

I was impressed with the incredible detail of the lesson plan including many many outside resource links.  It was most impressive and is more than I would be able to do or have done.  

 

Ben Owens 4 years, 11 months ago

Thanks, Patricia, for the thoughtful feedback! I'm glad you bring your NCVPS experience to this work! By the way, I'm one of the "Super Community Members" for this work and have been assigned to your cohort. Please reach out to me if you have any questions or just want to bounce ideas off of someone. Cheers!

Patricia Lipsey 4 years, 11 months ago

Thanks Bev,  so glad to have your help.  Appreciate  hearing from you and look forward to our being in touch.

 

Pat Lipsey

I will be honest, I really rarely think about copyright.  It is something I usually think of the school's media coordinator covering with students.  I do try to encourage students as I work with them to give attribution to their sources.  In fact, the last few years I've been encouraging students who need images to "take their own shots".  It is one sure way to be sure that the image is free of copyright.  Plus, the students in my middle school are in the midst of a image frenzy.  Their lives revolve around Istagram and Snapchat where images are king. I haven't published a lot of my own work.  I am a remixer though.  I've spent a lot of time on Pintrest and following groups on Facebook to get ideas and resources and then remix them to best fit both my needs and the needs of the students I work with.  I've used TPT in a pinch to get some ready at your fingertips resources.  I do feel that my days of relying on a textbook for information have passed.  Almost to the point of not being able to imagine having to follow a textbook to teach anything.  It certainly is a lot different perspective than a few years ago when I felt sorry for the teachers in my building who would not have a textbook to teach their curriculum from.  I have recently helped to create some professional development content in my district.  It is clear in my contract though, that content will then belong to the district.  I'm still mulling that over since the webinar last night.  

Last night I was struck by the public domain of the NASA website and the fact that it is public domain, but not clearly marked.  I focused my reading and reflection on that.  I understand that labeling would be time and expense for all those public domain sites out there.  However, it seems crazy that for the most part we are just supposed to know what is in most circumstances in the public domain and what is not.  No wonder this seems like a task that needs to be taught to our students. (and maybe a few fellow staff members).

I used the following sites

https://www.commonsense.org/education/articles/the-right-stuff-teaching-kids-about-copyright

https://creativecommons.org/share-your-work/public-domain/pdm/

https://wiki.creativecommons.org/wiki/PDM_FAQ 

I think my thought process is in transistion.  Right now it is in the looking at the attribution stage.  Just knowing I need to scroll to the bottom and see what it is.  Then, of course, once I see I can't not know!  Next I'm thinking, how will I reach my students with this?  How will I show staff with this so they get it and see it and teach it too?

 

Julie Joyner 5 years ago

Hi Christine. I think the NASA website is reflective of so many that have confusing Use policies. That’s one thing that impressed me with Creative Commons - the symbols are easy to understand and there’s an option to use the confusing legal jargon or plain English. 

Ben Owens 4 years, 11 months ago

Great point, Julie! The amount of high quality materials one can find on Creative Commons and especially OER Commons quite impressive - and as you mention, there is no confusion on how the resource may be used. That's probably why they became my go-to resources and why I look there first when bringing items into CoOpenNC (other than ones I created myself). The grey area with NASA and other government sites is when they work with a private entity to create and distribute materials. That's where one really has to read the fine print to see if it is indeed in the public domain or copyrighted.

Nathan Rutko 5 years ago

1.  Prior to the webinar, my experience with copyright was in teaching students about individual property, such as plays, songs, poems, etc. and how the artist/creator maintains rights on the property, and can sell, lease, or rent that property to other individuals and groups to market and sell products and/or services.

2.  In the past, I have shared documents, notes, lesson plans and other mateirals directly with colleagues through email and hard copy.  I have stated that the recipients are encouraged to modify the documents as they need or see fit.  I have also worked with students in reviewing and editing presentations, research papers and essays, focusing on how to credit other works and their creators.

3.  My thoughts have changed following the webinar, specirfically in revieiwng the quiz/game about matching the description and label, and in revieiwng the first link presented and how it defines and describes the levels of ownership and shairing of property.

Allen Tomlinson 5 years ago

1) What was your experience with copyright and intellectual property prior to tonight's webinar? 

Several years ago I worked with NCVPS to create Spanish courses. Although this was at least five years ago, I still remember the process that we had to go through in order to use something for the course. At that time there were no funds available to purchase content for the course, so we had to gather all resources from the internet, and we had to make sure that they were free and available.

2) How did you previously allow use of your intellectual property? 

Aside from a couple webpages, I'm not aware of any of my intellectual property being made available for use. I wouldn't have mind it being used by others, but it is not something I had thought about previously.

3) How has your thought process changed? Please reference both the webinar and the extra resource you looked at.

Based on the webinar and the information I found on the Creative Commons website, I have gone from almost complete ignorance on the topic, to being aware of the basic license types and the symbols they used. I also found informative the description of the three "Layers" of licenses. So far everything seems practical and straightforward. :)

RENEE MITCHELL 5 years ago

Before last night I never thought about copyrights or intellectual property, I just copied and used whatever resources I wanted in ways I wanted. Now, don't get me wrong, I never sold any work and I just gave it to anyone who wanted it. I treated work created by other people the way I viewed mine, take what you need and change it any way that you need. I now realize I should really be more respectful of others. Give credit where credit is due.

Now I will make sure I can use the image or reading passage before making copies. I have learned to check the code. I would hate to hear from a lawyer or worst have my county hear from laywers, because of my actions.

 

 

James Bello 5 years ago

1. Prior to tonight's webinar I had very litte experience with copyright and intellectual property. I was aware of the basics of copyright but honestly I have probably violated this law many times as a teacher. So this is all new to me.

2. Previously if I shared it with you or gave it to you, then you were welcome to use or edit it as you liked. Although with google drive I have been more conscientious when giving people editing rights or view only rights when I share thing with them.

3. It has changed my thought process by giving me a lot of stuff to think about and learn. I would be willing to bet I will be more about attribution than the other types due to my collaborative nature but there may be times when I desire CC-BY-NC-ND if there is something that I want to protect. I will have to be very meaningful in how I label my work.

NINA WALLS 5 years ago

I teach digital media courses and each course has at least one unit that discusses copyright law.  I feel that my experience with copyright law is broad.

2.  In the past I have openly shared my work with other teachers and I have never copyrighted any of my work.

3.  I can see both the postivie and negatives of copyrighting your work. I can see where copytrighting your work can lead to discouraging collaboration amoing teachers.

Shannon Curry 5 years ago

1.) I did not learn a lot about copyright and intellectual property when I was a teacher in the classroom. The first time I really learned about it was my first year as a digital technology instructional facilitator where I had to deliver professional development to other teachers about the nine elements of digital citizenship. When I rolled my sleeves and did my research was when I realized what it was and what I was doing in the classroom was not correct. I was happy to share my knowledge with other educators to help do the correct thing when we are using educational resources in our classroom. 

 

2.) I would typically share the resources through email, Google Drive and Team Drives. Within a few years, I recently learned about HyperDocs where you can remix other people's templates and add an attribute to your work. I liked sharing my resources with my name for others to be able to use, just like I like being able to use other people's resources and remix it to my needs. I am excited to see that we will soon have a bank of resources that educators throughout the state will have access to do the same thing! 

3.) My thought process changed in the webinar when Joanna shared the four different creative common licenses and what it means. I always thought that no commercial meant you could not make a profit off of someone else's work, not that you couldn't use it outside of school hours and in the private sector! My mindset changed when watching the licenses video when we copyright our intellectual property, we don't give up our work, but we are refining it. We don't want to restrict our work too much where we are restricting others and limiting their creativity.  

Martha Levey 5 years ago

I love your point about how restricting our work can restrict others and limit their creativity! I presented yesterday and licensed my PPT as CC-BY and told participants if they make my work better let me know so I can share/use their creativity!

1)  I would consider myself developing in terms of understanding and using copyrighted material in the educational setting.  I am familiar with fair use when it comes to articles andhow to give credit.  When our schools went 1-1, I could link to the article and that eliminated copies and any unintentional copyright infringement.  I had limited knowledge of creative commons.  With teachers pay teachers, I have become much more aware of copyright as I often see biology handouts super similar to old textbook resource handouts and the clear terms of use on each seller's resources.  I was told by a media specialist a few years back I can get thrown in jail for showing anything Disney.  I am sure with images I have violated copyright laws in creating labs/activities especially if I couldn't find the source.

2) I have been fortunate to teach with some fantastic teachers over the years and we would often collaborate at our school in lesson planning.  We would create with each other and share with each other and reflect on our teaching with each other.  More recently, I have collaborated with a younger biology teacher and given her access to my resources.  She and I have been part of a team developing performance-based objectives and state-aligned curriculum to share with teachers in the county.  I have never licensed my work, and I admit I worry that I might have an image that is not properly cited which holds me back from making it totally open.  I do email and share on google drive with teachers in my district.

3)  From the webinar, I realize I need to get up to speed on google docs and google formatting to make sharing easier and allowing for remixing.  Since our district now uses chromebooks, I converted my microsoft documents to PDFs to upload to google drive and then to haiku.  That prevents the remixing though.  It was a time issue since I had tons of tables and images which get messed up in google docs.  

I want to share more.  I enjoy kahoots and gimkits and after checking out creaivecoomons.org and doing some image searches I found a way to replace some of my images that I have no idea of their origination.  My only question is will I be able to find mitochondria and Golgi bodies?  

Charlene Burroughs 4 years, 11 months ago

Hi Christina,

I teach biology so of course GimKits are a fun way for students to use vocabulary and review vocabulary.  I also add images and graphs to increase the higher order thinking for the questions. 

Sometimes I use a GimKit like an entrance ticket and set the timer to 5 minutes.  Students come in and sign in and immediately they are on task...first ones in like the doodle feature.  I have used GimKits to review for quizzes or tests.  The students are highly competitive.  I like that the students can work at their own pace--unlike Kahoot.  I've used team mode and last spring Thanos mode.  Positive feedback from students...they find them engaging. Many of my students made them for an assignment in history in the spring, and I even had one group of guys that created a 500-question Minecraft GimKit and would play each other after school.

Students literally begged me to assign GimKits in homework mode, and they would try to reach certain goals.  I did not use them as a homework grade or require them but you could.  This year I plan to use in a class versus class battle either season-long or unit-long.  I also could see using a GimKit to gauge what students already know...for me a great topic for this would be cell organelles as this topic was taught in middle school science.

I think GimKits make a great progress-monitoring tool and you can set that timer to fill any time slot you have during a class period.

Christina Speiser 4 years, 11 months ago

Thanks for sharing those great ideas. I will definitely start using those this year.

Tesha Isler 5 years ago

1. Through my doctoral courses, I had several courses that discussed copyright information.  Also early in my career, I had a few trainings from the media specialist and administration about copyright.  

2.  I share my work openly for anyone to use without copyright. 

3. Thinking about copyright now, I realize how serious it is to give credit to anyone when using their work regardless to be safe. When using educational resources with certain copyright information, I will pay closer attention to what the author of the work intended for their product.

Melissa Culp 5 years ago

1. Prior to this webinar, I had a solid view on copyright and educational property. I have participated in reviewing and sharing resources before for a similar consortium. I feel like there is alway something to learn though and am looking forward to more pracice. 

2. I share my intellectual property openly.

3. I'm still processing my thought processes! I always share resources openly and freely - I don't neccessarily want that to change. I do like the idea of marking my work with how it can be used. I do agree that we need more instruction and continuous reminders of copyright laws. Using real examples/scenarios are helpful!

TATIA DAVIS 5 years ago

1) Prior to last night's webinar, I learned the bare basics of copyrighting and intellectual property in a technology course while in graduate school. However, the discussion was very brief, and I still needed to know what we as educators could and could not share or use when it comes to online and offline materials.

I know that my colleagues and I do not consistently check for the cc licenses when sharing material/documents. Do we routinely ask fellow teachers in our buildings where they got that PowerPoint presentation or lesson plan that they shared? If we have the right to make changes? What the specific copyright licences are for those materials? The answer is, unfortunately, no. I am sure that half of the material shared in schools where I have worked was not supposed to be changed, printed, or shared.

2) Prior to graduate school, I tried to make sure to give credit when I used material; however, I was probably not as careful as I should have been in some instances. I am positive that I was guilty of breaking copyright laws, as well as not consistently teaching all of my students about copyright/intellectual property. I admit that I was much more faithful in stressing the importance of checking the cc licenses in those classes that required a lot of research for assignments.

3) My eyes were definitely opened to the fact that it is my duty, as an educator to truly know and understand copyright laws/intellectual property. Learning about the different types of cc licenses tonight (such as  cc by, cc by sa, cc by nc) will completely change my practice as an educator. I will now be cognizant and careful about what material I use and how I use it. After reflecting on the webinar, I realize that understanding the use of materials protected by copyright should be a part of the on-going learning process for my students and me. While doing more research about copyright licenses, it became clear that I needed to create a classroom copyright policy and teach my students about the value of obeying copyright laws. This process will begin the first week of school. 

While studying extra resources about copyright laws, I learned that for my presentions and the accompanying print material, I need a slide at the beginning of all presentations that states that "certain aspects of the materials are included under the fair use exemption of the U.S. Copyright Law and have been prepared according to the multimedia fair use guidelines." I will be reviewing all of my presentations to make sure that I add that notice.

I also learned so much about guidelines pertaining to the limits of copyrighted material that can be used (including media, poems, music, photographs. Learning more about these specific limits on various materials (i.e., the limit for music and lyrics is up to 30 seconds or 10 percent, whichever is less), will be crucial to teach to my students, who create several multimedia presentations througout the semester. Another takeaway has been understanding the value in teaching students how to ask for permission when they are in doubt of the cc licenses of a work, song, etc. 

Martha Levey 5 years ago

Great point about teaching our students about licensing other people's work! Then, they can license their own. I'm one of the "Super Community Members" and you are in my group! Let me know if you have any questions!

Ben Owens 4 years, 11 months ago

Great comments, Tatia! I hope others on the thread will take a moment to read your perspective. Thanks for sharing!

TATIA DAVIS 4 years, 11 months ago

Ben, thanks so much for reading my thoughts! I look forward to learning a lot from you during our academy!

Latisha Hensley 5 years ago

I had limited experience with copyright and intellectual property prior to the webinar.  I often share and collaborate with colleagues freely and never copyright the work shared.  I have shared work through various platforms such as Google Drive, Canvas, websites, and even Twitter.  After engaging in the webinar and viewing the video clip, I realize that it is necessary to copyright the work created so that others will know if they can use, edit or modify one's work. I also realized that the process isn't as difficult as previously assumed.

Rebecca Welch 5 years ago

A lot of your AP teachers create materials from scratch and share them around, I'm sure.  I know that's how it worked with my AP Calc teachers.  Do you think there will be future info sessions on Creative Commons for these teachers?

BRANDY METZGER 5 years ago

1. My experience with copyright and intellectual property was minimal prior to tonight.

2. In the past, I have collaborated with other teachers in my building or across the county to share intellectual property.

3. I realized that as teachers it is very important to recognize copyrights so as not to get into legal trouble. I love the idea of opening resources up to teachers so that they can access them and use them for educational purposes.

I am a librarian so I have had a lot of training on copyright through my MLS program and professional development. However, I have to admit it, never occurred to me to copyright my own work. I have always shared what I created and didn't care if others used it. The webinar made me realize that copyright makes my intention to share clear and may actually make it get used more because others know exactly what I intended when sharing. 

 

1. Our district ELA specialist went over this with us last year, but I learned even more last night. We definitely all need to pay more attention to this.

2. I never required that credit be given, but I will from now on, This is really important and we need to model how to do this for our students. 

3. I really want to incorporate this into what I do, and work with other teachers in my department. I was excited to see that this is not just a resource that we can use, but also a place where we can share our ideas. I looked at some information from the NY Times. I have used some of these resources, but there are so many more. They provide information about using all of their materias as well: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/08/21/learning/how-to-use-the-learning-network.html

Rebecca Welch 5 years ago

Prior to the webinar, I only knew that copyright and intellectual property existed and that if I wanted to use other peoples material I needed to cite it.  Because of this restriction, I only searched for free images that were open resourced.  Previously, I really didn't care what others did with my intellectual property.  My view was that if I created something, I wanted to share it if I thought it would be good for kids.  My thought process on this has changed because now I know I can still do this, but give myself credit and limit what others can do with my property.  I think this is more of a protection for myself, too, as it would limit someone from taking credit for my material (and also me potentially being accused of being the person to break copyright).  I'm not saying I want to make money off of my materials, but down the line when I am retired and have the time I still can make money off of what I create if I have time.  From the webinar, I know that I can license the works as CC-BY-NC-ND and if districts wanted to use my work or modify it they could purchase it.  It's more complicated than the one sentence I wrote above, but this is the simplistic version.

I have had some training on copyrights over the last 5 years though a technology grant I received. A large part of our initial training was on learning what we could and could not use/share on our learning management systems. The topic has been revisited in ongoing trainings over the course of the last few years.

In the past few years I have openly shared any and all property. As a younger teacher it was much harder for me to want to share things I created. After having children, I came to realize that we are (or should be) in this for the children. I want my personal children to receive the best education possible. In order for that to happen, collaboration needs to happen. Since then, I have openly shared everything I could though google drive, canvas, PLCs, simply by emailing, etc.

While I thought I had a firm understanding of copyrights and sharing intellectual property, I found that it is important for me to revisit this topic more frequently than what I currently do. My big "ah-ha" moment was in the webinar when it was mentioned that using resources with non-commericial licenses means it cannot be used for tutoring! It never occurred to me that while I am not trying to sell the product or make money directly off of the product, I am still making gains from the use of it! I will be frequently revisiting this information frequently in the future. 

Jessica Fariss 5 years ago

I agree with your "ah-ha" moment!  I also had not thought about tutoring and copyright.  When I was thinking of commerical use, I was thinking more about selling the acutal product.  That was a definite eye opener and something I will be more cognizant of from now on!

Melissa Barnhart 4 years, 11 months ago

Hey Heather :)   I too found it difficult to share before I had children.  I still shared things anyway, but it was hard for me.  It always felt like I was just giving away my blood, sweat, and tears.  But I definitely feel more of the "it takes a village" now that I have children and better understand! 

PS- I didn't realize that about the tutoring either!  That was not something I had ever thought of!

LINDA TUGURIAN 5 years ago

As a former technology facilitator working in a Media Center, I've had some experience both learning and teaching students about copyright and intellectual property.  I've found it's a cumbersome process and often a low priority for teachers who are short on time and in desparate need of a quick solution.  Many resources on the web in particular are not labeled in such a way it's easy to find the actual copyright information.  I have published things to our shared resources, but as it is protected by an authentication process, I really haven't thought about how I allow use of this as intellectual property.  I'm wondering more about about how curriculum materials that are developed by schools are or should be labelled (or if this is necessary).

Susan Joyce 5 years ago

1.  My previous experience with copyright and intellectual property was to look for the copyright symbol and then the words to see if it could be copied and used in an educaitonal setting, or if I needed to ask permission to use the material.  We also are trying to teach our students about how to properly use and cite information and work from others.  

 

2.  I've not ever copyrighted or attributed anything I've created for my students or teachers, and I'm sure I'm missing out on income from Teachers Pay Teachers!  I have just always shared with other teachers, as they have shared with me.  I just believe in helping each other, especially when our state is not putting money into resources, and we are forced to spend hours and a lot of money to create and find resources.

3.  My thought process about licensing is still up in the air about what to license.  As I read the article on OER, I had many thoughts.  I wonder how to teach students about the different licenses?  Unfortunately I know many teachers that have created their own units or lessons, shared them with friends, and then the material somehow ended up on someone else's TPT store, for sale.  I'm also wondering how the quality of the resources in the Open platform will be reviewed!

I am very, very interested to see how these open licenses change instruction, and I hope it is for the better!  Every student deserves a high quality, engaging education.  Every teacher deserves access to high quality resources, without spending hours searching and preparing and revising, or spending out of pocket money for curricula.  The resources and materials should already be provided by the state and district.

1.  I work with our district on training teachers on copyright.

2.  My property is normally shared:  Attribution, Non Comercial.

3.  I don't think my thought process has changed. I have always been very open with sharing and allowing others to use anything I created if they though it, or parts of it, would help them.  In the past I did not ask for attribution, but I do now.

 

APRIL COOPER 5 years ago

1. I have had quite a bit of experience using, and sharing about copyright because I teach that as a main component of web development and design in general (community college level courses). On a smaller scale I try to at least go over copyright a bit with my high school students as needed. I also, personally, have needed to copyright my own work (my book, photography, designs, etc.)

2. I have actually allowed open access to a few of my high resolution photos... there are some major websites now that openly allow for sharing works with no attribution required. As an educator, I have freely shared my teacher work/lessons, etc. and typically haven't put any copyright acknowledgement on them! I didn't mind sharing! Like in the video in the webinar, teachers have been sharing work all along - that is common.

3. My thought process has not changed, but it has indeed become reinforced. I chose to look at the extra resource relating to copyright licenses. Copyright is important, and on the most basic level comes down to respect... respect for the work of others, and of course in turn, in creating things you want others to respect your work as well.

Donna Jones 5 years ago

1) I had a geat deal of experience with copyright and intellectual property.  I'm the media coordinator for our school and the "go to" for questions but the answers I give are not usually what people want to hear so they do not always heed my advice.  It was a great review though.  It never hurts to review before school starts each year and I'd like to use the beginning slides of the presentation during our initial teacher meeting, with your permission of course! LOL!

2) I've always allowed use of my property for anyone as long as there are no modifications.  I don't want my meaning to be misconstrued/misrepresented because it is edited by someone else.

3) I may decide to change my permission stipulations.  I haven't decided yet.  I used the lesson "1.G Grandfather Tang's Story.  It was marked CC By.  I think that's helpful because a teacher may not have the book but gets the idea from the resource and uses another book that could go with the activity posted.  Since the materials can be changed, this would still be a good resource for the teacher to use.  I think this is a good example of remaking which was discussed in webinar 1.   

Melissa Edgerton 4 years, 11 months ago

I agree with you about an annual review of copyright and intellectual property. It has been years since it was done at my school. I think there are times when we wouldn't want people to change our work. I think about presentations especially. I also think of of all of the times I took ideas from resources and adapted them into really amazing activities. 

STEPHANIE REVIS 5 years ago

1) What was your experience with copyright and intellectual property prior to tonight's webinar? 

My masters is in Library Science with School Media concentration, so I have had some training on it, but the webinar and the resources were a great refresher to me. I have watched copyright and intellectual property become more prominent as digital content has developed over the years. 

2) How did you previously allow use of your intellectual property? 

I have never really thought much of how others have used my property; I've always tried to be careful with the property of others, but not so much my own.

3) How has your thought process changed? Please reference both the webinar and the extra resource you looked at.

I have discovered through the webinar and the resources, that I really need to brush up on my knowledge of Creative Commons Licensing. I will also need to really think about my own creations and how they will be shared with others - especially in a group and forum like the one we are about to embark on. 

Melissa Barnhart 4 years, 11 months ago

Hey Stephanie!  

I could definitely see where your masters program would provide great instruction on copyright.  I can't say the same about the program I was in for either my bachelors or masters.  It could have been the time period, and like you said as things have become more digitized I think this is becoming more of a growing issue.  

Luckily I learned a lot from working with North Carolina Virtual Public Schools and I agree, the webinar was a great refresher.  

Jessica Fariss 5 years ago

1. My previous experience with copyright and intellectual property involved the speech our media coordinator gives us during the first faculty meeting every year.  When I first started teaching, we had an "old school" librarian who I honestly was a little scared of!  She was the copyright police and kept all of us on our toes.  SInce she retired, things have beena little more relaxed and we no longer discuss copyright with teachers in my school.

2.  I previous allowed use of my intellectual property either by physically handing it to someone to use, or by sending it electronically (email, Google Drive, flash drive, etc.).

3.  I had never thought about actually writing permission for others to share and use on the things I create.  In the first webinar, I really liked the repeated discussion around how we should be collaborating/sharing the things we create with educators across our state, not just those that we presonally know.  We all spend so much time working, it would make things easier for everyone if we had/used a platform to share resources.  I think a big part of the equation is awareness.  The licesnse options are easy to use and understand - I think more educators just need to be aware of them so they can start using them.  On the Creative Commons site, I liked the choose a license feature.  For people who are just starting out, it walks you through everything to make it easy to choose the appropriate license for your work - I think that resource would be very simple for the educators in my building to use.  It also might help make the process less intimidating.  I also found a lot of great resources in the Downloads/Printable Media section that would be beneficial to share with my staff to encourge use of the licenses and use/creation of open educational resources. 

Rebecca Welch 4 years, 11 months ago

Hi Jessica!

 

In response to your answer for #3, the license feature is really neat on the Creative Commons site.  I think it will be fun to embed the images on our work - it will kind of make it official in a non-intimidating way.  How do you think you might share with your staff?

Prior to tonight,I had limited knowledge about specific types of copyrights. I did know about warnings and the ethics behind not using materials without permission. It has made me more aware of my role in protecting this right.

I have created and shared multiple documents for use in my classroom. I have mainly shared these with my K team at school or with other colleagues at my school. I have never given much thought to licensing them or copyrighting them. I actually didn't really know it was such an informal process.

I do see the importance of making it known and okay for others to use my materials if it is going to be posted on a sight like this. It would be inappropriate to post things for use by others if permission or credit had not been issued.

LISA MONTGOMERY 4 years, 11 months ago

Hi Melanie! I'm super glad you're in this group. I too thought the review of copyright was very helpful!

LISA MONTGOMERY 4 years, 11 months ago

Hi Melanie! I'm super glad you're in this group. I too thought the review of copyright was very helpful!

ANGELA ALMOND 5 years ago

1) What was your experience with copyright and intellectual property prior to tonight's webinar? 

Prior to the webinar, I had heard of the CC license and was familiar with basic copyright information.  I knew there had been a lot of controversy over TPT items.

2) How did you previously allow use of your intellectual property? 

Previously, I had just given my resources freely to anyone who asked for them.  I did not even think about putting any copyright on it.  

3) How has your thought process changed? Please reference both the webinar and the extra resource you looked at.

Now, I know there are different kinds of CC licenses.  I never even thought there were different kinds.  I am constantly telling my students they must cite their sources but I am guilty of not doing this in my own teaching and creating of materials.  I know that I must do better!  The example of the cited picture was a harsh reminder of this!  I really like the search of Creative Commons images on the website.  I plan on sharing this with my students when we go over copyright and citing at the beginning of the year.

VICKI OVERTON 5 years ago

1. No prior experience with copyright and intellectual property

2. I allowed anyone to use in any way they wished

3. The webinar made me aware that I can continue to allow the same use of my intellectual property. The licensing game showed me that there are advantages and disadvantages to different licenses.

Rebecca Welch 4 years, 11 months ago

Hi Vicki!

I'm like you - I also didn't have experience with copyright and intellectual property.  Like Joanna said, you can't unknow this information.  However, do you think it will be easy to get into the habit?

HEIDI PEREZ 5 years ago

1- With 24 years of expereince as a public school English and journalism teacher (5-12), attribution, citation, and appropriate source use is a daily instructional and ethical concern. 

2- I have and will continue to share any instructional materials and texts I authored with any teacher who wants to see, use, canibalize, or ignore them.  I'm a public school educator... public schools are #inthistogether.

3- My thought process hasn't really changed.  I understand licensing and attribution and the ethics involved.  Part of my job is to help teachers undertsand these concepts and remain ethical in their use and practice.  I plan to use the slide from the slide deck with the simple representation of the different license types and connect it to our use of our adopted curriculum resource and commonlit.org, which we use frequently in our schools.

Rebecca Welch 4 years, 11 months ago

Hi Heidi!  I'm curious - do you think that HS English teachers are commonly embedding instruction on this kind of citation, or do you think they are teaching MLA/APA?  Or is this a requirement?  

Rebecca Welch 4 years, 11 months ago

Hi Heidi!  I'm curious - do you think that HS English teachers are commonly embedding instruction on this kind of citation, or do you think they are teaching MLA/APA?  Or is this a requirement?  

KATHRIN MORRISON 4 years, 11 months ago

1. Before attending the webinar I have had  a LOT of training on copyright through teaching for NCVPS. This training has impacted my f2f classroom as I realized how many rules I was breaking. However, I know there is SO much more to know and am excited to learn even more.

2. I have not really ever thought about copyrighting my own materials. I always thought that since in my head it was fine for people to use, remix, adapt, etc that I didn't need to put a copyright on my things. I have always given and shared freely with others.

3. After the webinar, I have realized that it would be important to put a copyright and terms of use on my materials. This will make it easier for colleagues to know that they are allowed to freely use my material. Prior to the webinar I did not know all the easy abbreviations that I can use to copyright my material. In my own research I have discovered how important CC is globally. I I absolutely LOVE this idea of having a place that houses materials that can be reused and remixed and that I will know the terms of use.

JOY MCCORMICK 4 years, 11 months ago

1.  Full disclosure....I knew the c with a circle around it meant stuff.  I often ignored it.  I also ignored "do not reproduce" printed on papers many times.  I haven't been quite as guilty the last few years, simply because of copy count restrictions at my school.  However, I did turn to posting pages online for student access which I now know could also be copyright violation.  I definitely had my eyes opened to possible consequences!

2.  It depends on who was using!  With co-workers in my school, I usually share freely.  I have other "teacher friends" in the district and state that I collaborate and share work with.  I am hesitant to share with people I don't know.  I never had a copyright or license or included my name on anything I shared.

3.  I like knowing that I can share stuff and have it attributed back to me.  I like knowing that I can define possible restrictions based on what I am sharing.  I also like that I can receive activities from other people and know that I am free to reproduce, edit, etc. based on their licensing.  I had no idea that the creative commons exists, much less that it is as widespread as it is.  I was thinking worksheets and lesson plans, but looking at creativecommons.org, I can see photos, videos, music, all kinds of media available for use.

WENDY WILKINS 4 years, 11 months ago

1. Prior to the first webinar my knowledge of copyright and intellectual property was limited. I was limited to the print copyright and some online copyright information, but the webinar was extremely informative and eye opening to include all of the online resources we have available. The webinar was especially helpful for teacher like myself who have completed their degrees far ahead of the internet. It's been 20 years since I've graduated college and been given "training" on copyright. I loved Joanna's repeated reminder in the webinar that we can't "unsee" or "unread" something; so there can be no excuse for not giving attribution once we know about it.  

2. I allowed use of things I created freely, without any attribution given. 

3. My thought process has changed in that hearing the many DIFFERENT ways a resource can be given attribution. I had no idea I can be specific to the type of attribution I give a piece of my work. In the same way, it opened my eyes to the different ways I must see how other people's work can be used by me. I was also surprised and shocked at the amount of money districts can be sued for if copyrighting. 

LYNN GATTIS 4 years, 11 months ago

1) What was your experience with copyright and intellectual property prior to tonight's webinar? 

I have had some training regarding copyright and intellectual property.  This was far more indepth.

2) How did you previously allow use of your intellectual property? 

I would share Google Docs, but make them view only (but others can still copy it). 

3) How has your thought process changed? Please reference both the webinar and the extra resource you looked at.

I need to start protecting my intellectual property! After reading and reviewing the Creative Commons webiste and listening to this webinar, I didn't really think that it was really that big of a deal.

JENNIFER BRINKLEY 4 years, 11 months ago

1) Prior to the webinar I knew about copyright and intellectual property but not in to much detail.  I thought that if I did not create it or it wasn't from a reproducible, it was copyrighted and I shouldn't share it. 

2) I use to give worksheets and notebooks to my collegues to use and do with what they want.  I never knew or thought to label my stuff.  I did have a person at the district years ago, ask me for a document.  I shared it with her (having my name saying 'created by' on the bottom).  When she shared it with other teachers across the district, she had everything the same with the exception of my name.  I was upset and she lost my trust. 

3) I see the value in Creative Commons license.  I was sitting in a workshop and in the powerpoint, there were two different times that I saw the CC license come up and I thought to myself what Joanna said.... "Once you know it, you can't unknow it"

TERENCE FERNUNG 4 years, 11 months ago

1) What was your experience with copyright and intellectual property prior to tonight's webinar? 

Prior to tonight, my experiences with copyright was limited. As I started my Masters in Library Science last fall, I have become more experienced with copyright, but all the different types of copyright from tonight's webinar was fascinating and eye-opening. 

2) How did you previously allow use of your intellectual property?

I allowed anyone to use my materials. It never occured to me to have them give me credit. I figure that we are all in this together, and the more I can help someone else, the more I get out of the experience. 

 

3) How has your thought process changed? Please reference both the webinar and the extra resource you looked at.

My thought process hasn't changed. I don't mind if people use my resources/lesson plans/or materials. I will be more cognizant of using others materials, and will be a spokeperson within my school district about copyright. 

MELISSA KING 4 years, 11 months ago

1) Like many others, I was trained about using copyrighted and intellectual materials through NCVPS. I learned which sites to use and give attribution to through that training. As a classroom teacher, I'm sure I have used copyrighted content improperly in the past (without really knowing or thinking about the implications). Since learning more, I have tried to be more cosnignant about my usage which often leads to me creating things from scratch which wastes valuable time.

2) I've always shared anything I created with other teachers (in my school or sometimes the district) without giving any thought to the fact of it being my intellectual property and that I needed to state that fact. I did notice that when I used commoms resources in Canvas or added my own resources to the commons, I had to select one of the creative commons licenses.

3) The webinar really made me think about taking credit of my work when I share and being more careful of what I use in the classroom (thinking about the lawsuit story shared). I didn't realize that creative commons was international until exploring and seeing the 4.0 discussed. I also found the CC Search mentioned on their blog useful for finding open licesnsed images as I didn't know about that resource. 

BRADLEY BARTO 4 years, 11 months ago

1. My experience so far has been fairly limited. I was aware but did not always seek out the information. In our county, we were required to complete an online training course about copyrights were sent e-mails about the need to be more cognizant of what we use in our classroom and on our webpages.

2. Previous work I have created I have been willing to share without any copyrights or terms of use.

3. After gathering information from the webinar and additional research, my view has changed. I think it is important for the users of information to understand your intent as the author of the material. In an age of information it is vital that you have some control over the usage of resources created. 

Dawn Perez 4 years, 11 months ago

1) What was your experience with copyright and intellectual property prior to tonight's webinar? 

I have a working knowledge of copyright, but my work with #GoOpenNC has broadened my knowledge.  

2) How did you previously allow use of your intellectual property? 

I provide my work with no copyright info or licensing.  It is open for anyone to use in any way that would support their students.

3) How has your thought process changed? Please reference both the webinar and the extra resource you looked at.

I now look at all materials (even those from government agencies) to be sure I can use online.  I usually provide credit even if not required as a "model" for teachers and students.

SUZANNA SMITH 4 years, 11 months ago

1. I had very limited experience and knowledge of copyright prior to the webinar.   It was a topic covered in undergrad and graduate studies but it did not seem relevant to me.  If I found something online or in print, I would check if it was allowed to be used or reproduced for the classroom but did not really think an further than that. 

2. Previously, I would share my work with team members through our shared drive at school or Google Docs.  

3. After attending the webinar and reviewing additional resources, I understand now that copyright is not just "you can't copy that!"  Copyright is as simple as understanding what the author requests and giving a short credit line.   I am very willing to share my work with others through this platform.

Joanne Rowe 4 years, 11 months ago

1)  Prior to this webinar I had classes that discussed the need to respect copyrighted material and fair use for educational purposes.  I have had one particular experience where I had made a class code available on my wikipage and was asked to remove it.  That was when I learned that even though I thought I had removed something online that there was still a trail of files that were affected that also needed to be addressed before I fully resolved the problem.  That has made me much more careful about what I can post online to students. Another example, though not directly related to public education, is how needlework artists approach their patterns.  I knit and use the site Ravelry.  Some patterns are free, some allow permission to make a copy for personal use, and some do not allow pattern to be used to sell finished product for profit.  Use depended on the decision of the creator.  

2)  As for my own material, I have participated in developing two separate unit plans with the Charlotte Teacher Institute with the understanding that those lessons would be available to anyone who accessed the unit through their website.  I have not given it much consideration about copyrighting my own material beyond that particular example. 

3)  The webinar has shown all the possible examples of what we need to consider for intellectual property.  It was much more extensive than I had really given thought to for my work as a teacher.  I am excited about this collaboration and I can see why Copyright Laws are first on the agenda.  If we want teachers to participate in this program, we need to make sure we are all on the same page as to what can be used and what falls under copyright laws that may not be admissible.  From the examples on the website, I could see that some came from individuals and some from commercial sources.  

Melissa Barnhart 4 years, 11 months ago

Hey Joanne!  

Great example of the domino effect that can occur from a copyright issue.  I wish I knew more about copyright from the beginning because I am sure when I was a younger teacher, and in the classroom I violated copyright a few times without realizing it. 

I also love your knitting connection.  I had not even thought about how far reaching all of this copyright stuff goes!

BITSY GRIFFIN 4 years, 11 months ago

1) Copyright, intellectual property, and fair use was covered in my grad school program (MLIS). However, I took a copyright course on Coursera that was amazing and much more practical. 

2) I put CC on some of my items (like my blog), but not on all (like shared google items), but my (previous) thoughts were that people could copy and use with mods. However, without explicitly saying so, I've been leaving people to wonder if they can use my work, OR leaving them with the assumption they can just take it and claim it as their own. 

3) So, I started a Library digital planner to share out, and I added a CC to the top slide. I'd used the CC site before to generate the info for my blog - Now, I've just got to get in the habit. This is more of a change in action than a change in though, but I started going back through the things I've shared and adding CC, so the people who run across it know how they can use it. 

MARTHA ARRINGTON 4 years, 11 months ago

1) Prior to the webinar, I have had very little training on copyright and found the information very informative. 

2) I have never used copyright on my work, and just share it freely through Google Drive, Haiku, or email. 

3) I now have a greater understanding of copyrights and the different types after reviewing the CC website. Also, I liked the scenario (game) on the presentation and thought that was an easy way to view the different types of licenses.  Additionally, I believe it is essential that all educators are informed about copyrights and licenses, so they do not unintentionally misuse resources.  

Melissa Edgerton 4 years, 11 months ago

Over the years, I have wondered why we don't refresh our copyright knowledge each year. It's been a long time since it was done in my building, and I think of all of our staff members who have never heard it discussed. I agree all educators should be informed of how to ethically honor copyrights. 

Dawn Perez 4 years, 11 months ago

I think this platform will help educate all of us on copyright and free use.  

ASHLEY MILLER 4 years, 11 months ago

1.  We have had numerous workshops/PD on copyright and I also had experience with NCVPS.

2.  I just gave it away without any documentation that it was mine.

3.  It still overwhlems me to think I could be "stealing" without even realizing it.  I find myself focusing so much on the student aspect of it I know I am guilty of using something that wasn't intended to be used in that way.  I will try harder in the future to at least  cc by to give credit where credit is due.

Torrieann Dooley Kennedy 4 years, 11 months ago

1. Prior to tonight's webinar, my only experience with copyright and intellectual property was to make sure to include author's names when citing text or referencing work as well as being careful not to use images that were copywritten or watermarked when creating presentations or documents.  I had seen the Creative Commons copywrite logo on several documents published in my district and am embarrassed to admit I never researched what they meant.  

2. In the past I would strategically share the use of my intellectual property. Google Drive is probably the platform I most commonly use now, and when I want to allow others to use my work I share it in edit or force copy mode. If I am putting work out there that I do not want changed or edited in any way, I usually save it as a pdf. Additionally, I will occasionally put my name on my work so others know where it originated from. 

3. In reflection of what I have learned from the webinar and articles, I think it is great to copyright what I create and be more intentional about sharing my work.  I also need to be more careful about work I lift from others, especially from the internet.  I am considering how I will begin to use the Creative Commons icons and replacing the pdf mentality.

Melissa Edgerton 4 years, 11 months ago

I don't thik you should feel embarrassed by not knowing. I think it was new to many of us. I understood the idea of intellectual property, but the logos were somewhat new to me as well. I have also shared many resources via Google Drive, but I think this will be so much better once it is up and running. I think of all of the work that has accidently been lost/changed in Google. This will keep the original and show the remixed version. 

EMILY POTTER 4 years, 11 months ago

1) I had virtually no experience other than the PD provided from school about the legalities and the understanding of what it meant.

2) I am more of a finder than a maker when it comes to individual lessons.  I don't believe in reinventing the wheel...and there are so many people who are already making/creating things for classrooms.  I do however love the idea of remixing ideas....legally.

3) I love love love the idea of freely sharing things I do create and I love how easy the notations for creative commons licenses are to read and understand...."once you see it you can't unsee it".  

HELEN NAGAN 4 years, 11 months ago

Through NCVPS, I have had many opportunities to learn about and use the guidelines for intellectual property and copyright. When working on course revisions, I needed to be especially careful with using and changing the images of others. Background music for my self-made videos also was used and cited carefully. My own work was cited within the new course. However, any of that was within a framework and I did not think about it at all. I also do other artwork, mostly caricatures. I consider those to be the property of the people who buy them, to use how they like. Now that I am being made more aware of the ways that I can let others use my work, I am thinking more about how that can be done. Perhaps adding some of what I have created, both for teaching and artistically, can be added to this site or other public sites with a cc designation added. This kind of clarity makes the use of intellectual property less confusing.

AMY FOREMAN 4 years, 11 months ago

1. My previous experience was solely of copywright. I knew it existed and to check materials before copying or distributed, I also knew that images had creative commons licenses. That was about it.

2. I usually just share with teachers in my building unless specifically asked by someone outside of my school. I was a GTN teacher and had to sign over everything I created, other than that I have not credited my work.

3. I have learned a lot about creative commons this week. The webinar information about the different licenses was eye opening and then I started looking at the website and am trying to take it all in. I actually walked away with some questions. In the about section on the creative commons website it states, "Please note that CC does not verify whether the images are properly CC licensed, or whether the attribution and other licensing information we have aggregated is accurate or complete. Please independently verify the licensing status and attribution information before reusing the content. " I thought the purpose was to be able to use the images, videos etc. as long as you gave attribution? So how would I verify that it is properly licensed?? I also explored the OER commons website and found the Hubs option. Was thinking this would be a good way to collaborate with my grade level or for vertical planning, could even go across the district with it which would be even better! I also found an article titled, "What is Creative Commons? Creative Commons Information Pack for Teachers and Students" (www.smartcopying.edu.au), it had a great chart with all of the licenses listed which would be an excellent way to teach my students about creative commons, which I am already planning to do!

KIMBERLY CASTNER 4 years, 11 months ago

Answer in paragraph, bullet or any way, but answer all three parts!

 

1) What was your experience with copyright and intellectual property prior to tonight's webinar?  Prior to the webinar, I had very limited experience with copyright and intellectual property.  

2) How did you previously allow use of your intellectual property? Through sharing via google drive, selling some products on Tpt, and collaborating with teammates.

3) How has your thought process changed? Please reference both the webinar and the extra resource you looked at.  The webinar has opened my eyes to copyright laws and sharing of information with others.   I'm leaving with a greater sense of awareness to pay more attention to how the resource is copyrighted and how it is allowed to be shared.

Sherry Edwards 4 years, 11 months ago

 

1.    My experience has been mostly with standard copyright law.  Have had some experience in creative commons mostly for artwork and music to use with students.  Did not have a strong background on how you get a licence or the different ways to use creative commons items and cite them or reference them correctly.  Had not really thought of the use of creative commons for teaching resources.

 

2.   I have not really used creative commons with my intellectual property, but I could use it for items I create and share in the future.

 

3.From the video on creative commons I learned that the sharing of ideas in a creative commons setting can change the way our students create and collaborate with others in many different  fields.

KAYLA HOPPER 4 years, 11 months ago

1. I hadn't had any specific training since getting my bachelor's degree. None of the school's I have worked for have ever trained their teachers on copyright nor on intellectual property. 

2. I just always share whatever I make with whomever wants or needs it. 

3) Before now, my thoughts on copyright and licensing were pretty black and white. I'm really excited by the resource I viewed that explained and gave a way for my to refine my copyright so that others can take my work within certain parameters to use as their own. I'm really excited that OpenEd is going to allow teachers to explore with Creative Commons via this platform.

FRANK RICE III 4 years, 11 months ago

I agree Kayla most complexities are lost to doing what we need to do. Not being a priority for some admins or leaders we learn little about the importance or key components of digital. Webmasters usually know and are aware,  but not all stakeholders. I think it wont be long before all stakeholders will need to be participatory. OpenEd I agree is exciting.

BETH SPATARO 4 years, 11 months ago

1.  I have had training on copyright laws by the media corrdinator at the school I taught at.  Have always known about copyrights.

2.  I have shared my materials freely with coworkers, but have never labled them with labeled them with a usage label.  

3.  Finding quality teaching materials is a touch job sometimes.   I have been guilty of breaking or not even looking at copyrights if I find something useful, although I did always cite my sources when using a resource.  I also never copyrighted my own work either.  Most of my stuff was never put online by myself to be found by others but sharing freely with others it most certainly could have by others.  I would have used the open sharing label just because I feel that teaching is hard enough let alone be kept from using a quality piece of work because someone doesn't want to share its value with others.  We need to collaborate together and share our work for the sake of the children we teach.

Melissa Edgerton 4 years, 11 months ago

Beth, I am in the same boat with you. I typically look to see what else is out there before I start creating resources from scratch. I have always been willing to share, but I usually don't post my work on open forums. But I love the idea of this platform where we can share resources and remix them to make them work for us. I keep thinking of all the time it saves. 

Mollee Holloman 4 years, 11 months ago
  • Prior to the webinar, I felt comfortable with navigating resources and using materials from other ethically through my training as a librarian, but not yet as confident as I should be with being able to communicate the ins & outs of it with others (yes! I know where my librarian short-falls are!)
  • Like others have said here, I share widely with my school, other librarians, on Twitter, my blog, etc. I've never put a price on anything or CC until I had some of my work taken and used by others (receiving credit) about a year ago. Since then, if I share at a conference or with peers, I include creative commmons licenses
  • Oh my feelings have really changed just this week! My biggest take away was Joanna's "you can't un-know once you know" statement and how I can teach others that mentality. On Twitter this week, I found my work from a couple years ago being shared by 2 people presenting it to others and there was absolutely no credit to me or the co-creator :( It's really disappointing to work hard to create original work that will hopefully help and inform others, but receive no credit. So I'm taking that learning experience and frustration and 1) funneling it to help how other creators learn how to protect their shared work (especially on #GoOpenNC), and 2) how to positively model for others how and why it's important to give creators credit! 
Melissa Edgerton 4 years, 11 months ago

I think you did an excellent job summing all of this up. I also had some work used without credit. That changed how I felt about how I share my work. I also loved Joanna's "you can't un-know once you know" statement. 

BRUCE KETCHAM 4 years, 11 months ago

1) What was your experience with copyright and intellectual property prior to tonight's webinar? 

Limited in what it should be.  I know that it is important to cite my sources, but I don't do it as I should.

2) How did you previously allow use of your intellectual property? 

My own resources I always allowed without any restrictions.

3) How has your thought process changed? Please reference both the webinar and the extra resource you looked at.

"Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs
CC BY-NC-ND

This license is the most restrictive of our six main licenses, only allowing others to download your works and share them with others as long as they credit you, but they can’t change them in any way or use them commercially. "  I like this the best for certain activities and questions I post online.  I defiently don't want anyone making money off the work I post for free. 

https://creativecommons.org/licenses/

Melissa Barnhart 4 years, 11 months ago

Hey Bruce!  

I feel like we all felt like that when we first started learning about copyright.  I still remember the first lesson I went through in my first course on copyright.  I immediately thought of all of the times I had already messed up copyright-wise.  But I think a lot of us have.  I have been a lot more diligent since then :) 

LANDRA CARTWRIGHT 4 years, 11 months ago

(1) I attended many trainings on copyright.  I grow frustrated with teachers and copyright, I don't want to be the copyright cop so what is the right thing to do when see a teacher break copyright.  I have a renewed interest this year to try to educate and role model better use of resources and appropriate copyright use..  (2) I usually share things I create freely for others to use.   (3) My thought changed to giving credit for everything I use from the suggestion in the webinar.  I like the idea that citation on a slide is not unattractive.  

MADISON ROBERTS 4 years, 11 months ago
  1. Prior to tonight, I knew very little about copyright. No one I had borrowed resources from, in person, had ever mentioned it or had anything printed on their copies. I had noticed things from TPT with a little c symbol and their store name beside it. But I only thought that it was necessary when BUYING resources. 
  2. All the teachers at my school share resources in a google drive. Every couple months I upload the resources I’ve created since I last uploaded resources for other teachers to use as needed. I like other teachers using my things, and honestly it gives me an opportunity to show them that I can make my own things (I’m a BT, so I feel the need to prove myself sometimes). 
  3. My thought process has changed in that I’ve NEVER realized that it’s “technically” illegal to share resources as I do. The article shown in the webinar where a school system was sued for millions was shocking. I definitely have noticed in the past couple days while looking at resources (all kinds) that a majority - even some from TPT- do not have any kind of copyright markings. 
JENNIFER TABOR 4 years, 11 months ago

1) What was your experience with copyright and intellectual property prior to tonight's webinar? 

My previous experience with copyright and intellectual property prior to the webinar was minimal. I was in one PD session where it was briefly talked about, but that has been the extent of it.

2) How did you previously allow use of your intellectual property? 

Previously I have allowed the use of my intellectual property without really thinking about it. I put things on my website, and they are not protected in any way. They could be used or copied by anyone.

3) How has your thought process changed? Please reference both the webinar and the extra resource you looked at.

I learned that copyright is not "one size fits all" and thereare different ways that work for different situations. I also realized that  I have been woefully unprepared for working with Creative Commons and both using and sharing intellectual property. It is definitely something that I need to be more aware of.

Anna Kennedy 4 years, 11 months ago

* I had some training regarding copyright and intellectual training, but nothing as detailed as what I was presented in the webinar.

*I will share my documents often with others, but never gave much thought into how I should go about sharing my intellectual property.

*I really need to make sure I take this more serious.  After the webinar and reading the material it really made me reflect on how I should handle this in the furture.  Also, it helped me see it more postively as it is a way of protecting the work/time that we as eduators put into what we do. 

Melissa Edgerton 4 years, 11 months ago

I agree! This made me take a more serious look at the work I have created, used, and edited. 

CHERYL WILLIAMS 4 years, 11 months ago

Prior to the webinar, I thought I knew about copyright but I was overwelmed with this all, to be honest.  I knew you aren't supposed to change copyrighted materials and that you are supposed to give credit to them or leave the credit on if you are using it as is.  I think that many teachers cut and paste to save paper, due to copy limits in their buildings, but that is actually breaking copyright laws.  I didn't really understand the creative commons licensing and had no idea there were so many types!

I have never copyrighted any of my work and just shared with coworkers usually in a shared drive type enviroment.  I didn't really think about where they may have gotten materials they shared with me or if they had removed any copyright information from something.

Boy, I am still fuzzy about all this and have a lot to learn.  The website linked in the discussion was overwelming as well, but the game linked in the webinar showed me how little I knew and also opened my eyes to the possibilities of creative commons. I think that I will be more aware of copyrighted materials now and I am sure I will notice that fine print at the bottom of resources now!  I look forward to working on shared materials and knowing for certain what I can and cannot do with a material.

FRANK RICE III 4 years, 11 months ago

11. My experience has been part of my digital experience of 20 years…I remember looking into Copyright at the highest level to protect my intellectual property...it was detailed and daunting. My overall understanding has been taught through classes and PD’s of the many variants of definition.

2. I did not specifically define or share it’s use publicly.

3. My thought process has changed gradually and I add components and realities to look for the copyright classification of knowledge objects. The webinar related the differences and defining of attribution. The components help me to understand and utilize resources disseminating them, combining them and or just sharing. The importance is of ethics and foremost I understand knowing the standards and digital realities there is no turning back to ignorance about use. Media folks always share new directions and complexities of the use of media resources, Copyright is crucial and key in the use, housing and sharing of resources....it is the way to success. I looked into joint authorship and found exceptional details to help with works created by a collorative team. http://www.dmlp.org/legal-guide/works-owned-one-or-more-creators

Melissa Barnhart 4 years, 11 months ago

Hey Frank, I can't imagine trying to dive in to learn about copyright on my own.  I can definitely see how that would be daunting.  I went through a course on it with North Carolina Virtual Public Schools and I had people I could collaborate with and reach out to and I still found it daunting.  

MELANIE MOORE 4 years, 11 months ago

1. Before the first webinar, I had very limited experience with copyright and intellectual property.  I am looking forward to learning more.

2. Previously I shared my original works without placing any limitations on it.

3.  My thought process has changed from learning in the first webinar that  the different copyright restrictions can allow myself and others to edit or "remix" works to better increase rigor and relevance for students.

STEPHANIE TURNER 4 years, 11 months ago

1. Copyright and intellectual property is an integral part of the job of media coordinator/ librarian. Most of the questions from teachers tend to be "how can I get copies of this," or "how many copies can I make?" There are always fair use considerations, particularly when it comes to printed materials published in books. It is always exciting when a book moves into the public domain, but as I found out a few years ago, other countries are not as stringent as the US when openly publishing works in electronic form. Hence, if a book, or poem, is available on a website in New Zealand, that does not mean that work can be used openly in the US. Movies and videos are another issue. 

2. Most of the time, teachers do not share their lesson plans with the media coordinator, and so this one is a tough one for me to answer. 

3. The biggest shock to me was the copyrighting of materials from websites such as Teachers pay teachers. I have seen teachers use, and make hundreds of copies of materials from that website. I personally have never used it, and was not aware of the layers of copyright that were available. Teaching in the media center, I normally teach using technology, and utilize databases found in NC Wiseowl, so this has not been too much of an issue for me personally.

LEANNE CONYERS 4 years, 11 months ago

1.) I have very little experience with copyright and intellectual property prior to the webinar.  I understand the basic tenets of copyright as it pertains to written materials (i.e. books), but not to the depth from which I viewed on the webinar. I have tons to learn! 

2.) My intellectual property has always been free and available to anyone. 

3.) My process is changing considering the work I see others put in to creatively engage students. Their intellectual property should definitely be acknowledged and shared. The idea of remixing the property was valuable learning since we want to make sure we are diversifying our facilitation of the learning. I played the "game" as practice and appreciated the tenets of the video. 

LISA MONTGOMERY 4 years, 11 months ago

Hi Leanne!! I'm super glad you are in this group! I do think we're learning a lot! I'd love to collaborate with you in person about this.

LISA MONTGOMERY 4 years, 11 months ago

Hi Leanne!! I'm super glad you are in this group! I do think we're learning a lot! I'd love to collaborate with you in person about this.

LISA MONTGOMERY 4 years, 11 months ago

Hi Leanne!! I'm super glad you are in this group! I do think we're learning a lot! I'd love to collaborate with you in person about this.

DANIEL BRYANT 4 years, 11 months ago

I have been through staff development on Copyright. I was on a tech vanguard team and had to discuss this. I have seen the Disney video someone did on copyright and fair use that is totally compliant with the law using small clips to make it work. However, I have never been one to do well documenting sources in class while expecting my students to. I know bad form. 

I have ran a Google site and had people from across the country ask to use a Google slides I created and would try to share but often their domains forbid sharing from outside domains. So a site like this will be awesome for that.

I have seen the cc logos before but never really thought much about them till this webinar.  I think the graphic in the video (I watched it the next day) that showed the different options and the scale of the better of those options was really my aha moment of the importance and ease of this. 

Melissa Edgerton 4 years, 11 months ago

I agree about this platform being a great place for us to share resources. I've never minded sharing my work, but after having some of my work used without credit, and this webinar, it really makes me rethink what I do in the future. 

ASHLEY HURLEY 4 years, 11 months ago

Prior to our first webinar, my experience with copyright and intellectual property was, on a scale of 1-5 (1 being novice and 5 begin expert), a 3.5. I knew about it, did my best to educate my students about it and honor it when creating my own materials to share. 

Previously I allowed use of my intellectual property openly! I never thought to license it, as I simply don't mind sharing. If I develop something I that I find is of help to students and/or colleagues, I am happy to pass it along in hopes that it may help them too. 

The webinar changed my thinking in that the graphic along with Joanna's explanation of it made it clear. The items I create as well as the time I take to develop them are important. I also need to ensure I am fully and properly honoring the work and time of other colleagues and developers. The time we spent on the webinar definitely will enhance and deepen the conversations I have with students as they research and create. I will show them the "License Design and Rationale" video for sure and perhaps develop a station that uses the information found in the list found underneath the video--and credit the source of course!

JENNIFER WILLINGHAM BEALE 4 years, 11 months ago

1) What was your experience with copyright and intellectual property prior to tonight's webinar? 

  • I have been "schooled" on the process and importance through our disctrict and media center coordinator.
  • We were taught to some extent in College (years ago).

2) How did you previously allow use of your intellectual property? 

  • I would make sure that any of my PowerPoints or games have had my name and where the information came from on it.
  • And in more cases than not, just "allowed" anyone to take it.

3) How has your thought process changed? Please reference both the webinar and the extra resource you looked at.

  • I believe that you should be credited for your hard work but also especially give credit to those that you are using in whatever you are doing.  
  • I think you should know the difference in how you credit yourself and the credits of others.
KELLY STEVENS 4 years, 11 months ago

I also teach with NCVPS, we had extensive training a few summers ago in regards to copyright.

Site Sources.

Nothing since the webinar, but I had to make big time adjustments after the NCVPS training and co-taught with my media coordinator to all of our staff two years in a row as a result.  The training I had with NCVPS was EYE OPENING!

Nicole Smith 4 years, 11 months ago

1) What was your experience with copyright and intellectual property prior to tonight's webinar? 

I hadn't thought much about copyright and intellectual property with respect to teaching since my undergrad degree. I tried not to misuse materials, but there is always a lot of sharing amongst your teaching peers.

2) How did you previously allow use of your intellectual property? 

Typically I made materials and shared with my PLC and other peers. I didn't proactively add copyright info to my own creations.

3) How has your thought process changed? Please reference both the webinar and the extra resource you looked at.

Now I want to be more aware of actively attaching copyrights to my own intellectual property. Also, I plan to proactively look for materials made with different cc licenses.

Nicole Smith 4 years, 11 months ago

1) What was your experience with copyright and intellectual property prior to tonight's webinar? 

I hadn't thought much about copyright and intellectual property with respect to teaching since my undergrad degree. I tried not to misuse materials, but there is always a lot of sharing amongst your teaching peers.

2) How did you previously allow use of your intellectual property? 

Typically I made materials and shared with my PLC and other peers. I didn't proactively add copyright info to my own creations.

3) How has your thought process changed? Please reference both the webinar and the extra resource you looked at.

Now I want to be more aware of actively attaching copyrights to my own intellectual property. Also, I plan to proactively look for materials made with different cc licenses.

Melody Whitfield 4 years, 11 months ago

1. I know what copyright means, however, I would give credit to others who created the item I used.

2. I would create and share with others without even requiring them to give me any credit  for my work.

3. My thoughts have changed now that I know more about the Creative Commons. I have learned about the Creative Commons licenses.  The five types of labels will allow me to share will the knowledge of giving credit and controlling who can view and use it.

Melissa Barnhart 4 years, 11 months ago

Hey Melody!  

I've always shared my stuff with people too and never really expected to ask for them to give me credit, until not that long ago I saw some things I created with other people names underneath.  They may have "remixed" but it was clearly my work to begin with and I got a weird feeling like.  I think I understand better now why people should have to include proper citations  

Kimberlee Taylor 4 years, 11 months ago

1) What was your experience with copyright and intellectual property prior to tonight's webinar? 

2) How did you previously allow use of your intellectual property? 

3) How has your thought process changed? Please reference both the webinar and the extra resource you looked at.

1.  Prior to Webinar 1, I had the required copyright training each year about intellecutal property at the beginning of each school year.  Last summer, DPI hosted MANY workshops for DLC credit.  I went to 3 of these and was introduced to Amy Dawson who presented a "Before you flip, blend or personalize... Using OERs in the classroom" session.  OH MY LORD this was "eye-opening"!!!  There are LOADS of free, FREE stuff out there for the classroom.  I didn't have time to look into everything, but I was able to glean some useful stuff.  She talked about copyright and the intellecutal property copyright notifications.  You guys, I was so focused on the free stuff, I didn't remember the copyright information until Monday night!  

2.  Is it bad to say I was a borrower for most of my career.  I only thought people who were TPT contributors were using copyright.  I didn't have much that was truly mine.  Anything I had created, I was pretty closed fisted with except for my most closely regarded peers.  I didn't think MY stuff was worth much!

3.  I did realize that just because I don't think my stuff is worth anything, someone my be able to expand on my material and change it to become something worthwhile for their class/situation.

Melissa Barnhart 4 years, 11 months ago

Hey Kimberlee!  I can relate to how you felt about your stuff.  I think many of us feel similarly.  I don't think it's bad to borrow at all!  I think this whole #GoOpenNC movement is going to get that sharing vibe going a lot more (or at least I hope so).  

SHELLY CULLIPHER 4 years, 11 months ago

1.) Prior to the 1st webinar, I learned about copyright and intellectual property in depth during my masters program for Library Information Science. Additionally, I taught my ELA and Journalism students about these topics. I have also taught copyright and intellectual property to students via the media center and shared resources with colleagues to use in the classroom.

2.) Previously, I shared my work with colleagues freely. However, until about 3 years ago, I would limit my intellectual property to items I shared online by creating them in PDF form. In the last 3 years, I have begun to create Google Docs to share without any terms of use but I am debating on asking for attribution?

3.)Wow! I really didn't realize how many districts are facing lawsuits due to copyright infringment. I also realized that the copyright and intellectual property concepts have changed a lot since I completed my masters degree. I would like to include the information shared in the webinar in our district's professional development module for the digital teaching and learning competencies!! 

MONICA WRIGHT 4 years, 11 months ago

1) What was your experience with copyright and intellectual property prior to tonight's webinar?   I was not familiar with the codes we learned about tonight.  The only thing I knew about copyright was respecting the owner of a work, and having proper permissions to used it.

2) How did you previously allow use of your intellectual property? I've always shared whatever I have created with others.

3) How has your thought process changed? Please reference both the webinar and the extra resource you looked at.  I see the importance of copyrighting.  I also see the importance of teachers being able to collaborate and recreate a resource when needed.

Melissa Edgerton 4 years, 11 months ago

I wasn't familiar with the codes either, but they really seem helpful to me. I feel like this platform will be an excellent place for us to collaborate and easily adapt resources to fit our needs. 

ANGELA BROWN 4 years, 11 months ago

1) What was your experience with copyright and intellectual property prior to tonight's webinar? 

Prior to the first webinar, I had experience with copyright, but not a lot with intellectual property.

2) How did you previously allow use of your intellectual property? 

To be honest, I never thought much about intellectual property until I learned about it during the first webinar. I shared Google documents, spreadsheets, and slides that I had created, mostly in "View Only."

3) How has your thought process changed? Please reference both the webinar and the extra resource you looked at.

I have definitely realized that I have more to learn about copyright and intellectual property.

MARINA BONOMO 4 years, 11 months ago

1) What was your experience with copyright and intellectual property prior to tonight's webinar? 

I had taken a Copyright for Educators class through Coursera and it did a good job of explaining it. So I had some knowledge of it, but really didn't feel super comfortable partly because of all of the 2.0 and 3.0 and 4.0. Someone asked about that in the chat.  I did find an explanation in Wikipedia https://wiki.creativecommons.org/wiki/License_Versions that explained it has evolved over time.  I had no idea that Creative Commons actually went back to 2002! Fascinating! 

2) How did you previously allow use of your intellectual property? 

I really never thought about it. After being so afraid to post anything openly after all of the lawsuits (I am old enough to remember all the Disney lawsuits). I have always shared my stuff to coworkers and friends, but have not put much out openly. Knowing that I did not know the origins of some of the graphics. But technology has finally made some of that tracking and verifying easier as well.

3) How has your thought process changed? Please reference both the webinar and the extra resource you looked at. I am excited about actually creating things that are meant to shared and are safe from any copyright infringements. I am looking forward to creating more and sharing more using the licenses.  I am so happy we finally have something that works for the online world we live in and a way around using resources for more than one class or year which was not typically allowed under the Fair Use guidelines of existing copyright law.  I am always updating and changing and tweaking lessons, but there are some I want to use more than once! It is nice that this is a way we can actually legally do this. I like that it has clarified the really subjective guidelines we hve been forced to use with Fair Use. I read the document about the licenses again as well as the history of the Creative Commons.

CAMERON GUPTON 4 years, 11 months ago

1) What was your experience with copyright and intellectual property prior to tonight's webinar? 

Prior to the webinar, I have had very little experience with copyright and intellectual property. I have always understood what is copywritten and the work of someone else should not be plagiarized but I have always been influenced by the myth that if it is for the good of education it can be copied! 

2) How did you previously allow use of your intellectual property? 

I have a Google Drive that I share with other teachers and interns and I have always allowed them access and to freely use/tweak the resources as they see fit for their classrooms. I have no issue with sharing the resources I create. 

3) How has your thought process changed? Please reference both the webinar and the extra resource you looked at.

I need to be more mindful in the future about copyright and intellectual property. I have also never thought of labeling my own work with creative commons information. 

Melissa Edgerton 4 years, 11 months ago

I had similar feelings after this. This webinar has really made me reconsider labeling my work.

Lisa Ragland 4 years, 11 months ago

1) What was your experience with copyright and intellectual property prior to tonight's webinar? 

I have had numerous trainings, readings, and also helped with development through NCVPS. I am well aware of what's required but not always certain of what terms of use mean. When in doubt, I like to ask!

2) How did you previously allow use of your intellectual property? 

Teaching face to face was a whole different ball game. "Back in the day," I was aware that copyright was important but I am certain neglected it for the love of learning. ;)

3) How has your thought process changed? Please reference both the webinar and the extra resource you looked at.

I understand now that I can have a copyright for anything I create and designate whether someone else can use it, modify it, share it. I also have to pay close attention to any and all materials that I use and share. The webinar provided good resources for understand creative commons and various licenses.

KARRI STEPHENSON 4 years, 11 months ago

1.I have learned all of my copyright knowledge through my schools technology department or district leaders, which makes me know expert.

 

2. For my intellectual property I have always just shared it with other colleagues without asking for credit or added any type of copyright to my work.

 

3. After looking at Go Open Resources I think that teachers should copyright and take credit for their work but share it with others. I think the copyright is important to show the ownership so someone else can't take full credit for someone else's work. From this point own I am going to suggestions to my colleagues to copyright thier work but allow people to use thier materials.

KATHRYN WOODWARD 4 years, 11 months ago

1. Prior to webinar 1, I had some experience with copyright. I am working on my MLS so citing resources is very important. I had also attended a conference in which GoOpen was discussed and we looked at the copyrights! 

2. I had some things on TPT but, usually I would share with whomever wanted what I had made. 

3. My thought process has changed because I see the value in sharing resources. I think it is important for our students that teachers have as much access as possible to resources which will enhance their teaching practices. 

Melissa Barnhart 4 years, 11 months ago

Hey Kathryn :)   I 100% agree that the students benefit from our teachers having access to more resources.  I remember one year I worked with a fellow teacher during her first year teaching Pre-Calculus.  She was a newly single mom and was also working on her national boards.  She was a dedicated, motivated AWESOME teacher but just did not have the time to create as much as she wanted to because she simply didn't the time in addition to reviewing, learning, preparing as we all must do our first time teaching something.  I shared everything I had with her, note sheets, answer keys, homework assignments, quizzes, tests. And she thanked me repeatedly over and over that semester and always said that she didn't want her students to be at a deficit just because it was her first year teaching, or because she was a single mom with young kids.  We both wanted them to have just as many resources and to feel just as prepared as the students in my classes.  The next year, I was the only AP Calculus AB/BC teacher and  all of those pre-calculus students were mine.  I saw that the students in the other class were just as well prepared as those in mine.  They were on an even playing field and everyone benefitted from us sharing.  

Side note - That teacher to this day is one of my closest friends :) 

Bethany Orr 4 years, 11 months ago

1) What was your experience with copyright and intellectual property prior to tonight's webinar?   Prior to this webinar, I only had experience with copyright and intellectual property through minimal training that I received from my school.  I had a basic working knowledge of it, but I'm not sure that I was ever really clean on how it all played out. 

2) How did you previously allow use of your intellectual property? I'm a team player and I have always shared whatever I found useful or created individually or with my team.  I have never looked for any credit for the things that I shared, I've always just want to help and support other teachers. 

3) How has your thought process changed? Please reference both the webinar and the extra resource you looked at.  After viewing the webinar and the power point, I am now much more aware of looking for copyright and how I use and share items.  I'm glad to have a great resource that I can reference and share with the staff at my school.

KIMBERLY DELEHANT 4 years, 11 months ago

I look forward to sharing the copyright information with my school staff as well. I would bet that very few teachers are aware. 

Melissa Edgerton 4 years, 11 months ago

This webinar made me rethink all that I have created and shared over the years too. I've always shared in-house without copyright. The district even took some of my work, changed my images/schoolname, and shared it as a district example without giving me credit. It really changed my perspective on credit. I had never asked for credit either, but that really changed my perspective.

KRISTEN WHITAKER 4 years, 11 months ago

1) What was your experience with copyright and intellectual property prior to tonight's webinar? 

I knew of it, but didn't really think about it in relation to my teaching and designing and planning lessons. 

 

2) How did you previously allow use of your intellectual property? 

In the past, I would just freely share anything I make or do with other teachers... I don't ever label my creations with the different notes for copyright or intellectual property.  

 

3) How has your thought process changed? Please reference both the webinar and the extra resource you looked at.

My thought process has changed because I realize that some of the ways I have used or shared materials may not be the best way to do it. Now that I know to look for the copyright and use of teaching resource - I will be able to recognize when I can and cannot edit, redistribute, or share with others. Knowing the licenses and being able to practice on the webinar to identify (i.e chat box to "yell out" our answers, helped me see that it isn't hard to understand these differences in the licenses, but something I can remember and use in my daily teaching world and use on the GoOpenNC site.  The one thing that suprised me is the variance of the licenses within the Open Educational Resoources - the chart that showed "Most Open" to "Least Open" opened my eyes to how I need to be aware of the variety of licenses and how to use them!

KIMBERLY DELEHANT 4 years, 11 months ago

1) I had a little training on copyright through my Masters program, but really did know differences. I learned a ton from the webinar. 

 

2) I have shared my work, some on TPT, but never put a copyright on it. 

 

3) Thinking about copyright from the webinar, I need to be more aware of how I utilize resources I find, and also those that I create. I will also be less likely to mark them non-commercial as I was not aware that would limit them being used by certain groups of teachers or tutors, I just thought that meant they could not share the actual resource for profit. 

KATHERINE HARTTER 4 years, 11 months ago

1) What was your experience with copyright and intellectual property prior to tonight's webinar? 

My knowledge prior to tonights webinar with regard to copyright and intellectual property was limited to what I have read online, seen first hand, and the experiences I have had. 

2) How did you previously allow use of your intellectual property? 

I love to share the materials I create with whoever finds them helpful. I let my friends share with their coworkers and so forth. That being said however, if I shared the texts I have created I would have asked them not to share or limited the accessibility. I've spent a lot of time, money and energy creating them so it is different than a worksheet or lesson. 

3) How has your thought process changed? Please reference both the webinar and the extra resource you looked at.

My thought process hasn't changed much other than my knowledge. The webinar the other night was incredibly helpful to have the copyright laws broken down into each law and the coordinating graphics that went along with them. Going forward in the future I will be more aware of resources sharing rights.

Melissa Barnhart 4 years, 11 months ago

Hey Katherine :)   I am a "sharer" of resources too.  I've always loved creating them.  I have found it is really great to share with friends who you know will help in other ways, or who just need the help because they are new to teaching or to the course.  I have had some great working relationships where I may create a lot but when we collaborate they are great at proofing and helping come up with ideas for activities and how to keep things interactive.  Everyone has their strengths :) 

Laytora Dash 4 years, 11 months ago

1) What was your experience with copyright and intellectual property prior to tonight's webinar? 

I have learned about copyright in high school and college and how it gives credit to the creator.  

 

2) How did you previously allow use of your intellectual property? 

I am a sharer by nature and have never considered sharing my intellectural property.  After today, I will definitely reconsider asking for credit for content that I have created.

 

3) How has your thought process changed? Please reference both the webinar and the extra resource you looked at.

I have alot to consider given the information I have reviewed on the OER Commons and it is to my advantage to copyright what I create.  I will also be mindful of how I use other people's resources and give proper credit to those individuals.

Melissa Edgerton 4 years, 11 months ago

Prior to this webinar, I had participated in staff development where my media coordinator reviewed the rules of copyright and intellectual property. That was years ago and has not been reviewed in my building since. 

I honestly have never really shared my resources in an open platform before. I have shared resources I created among my peers, mostly in my school. I never even considered copyright for my work. 

I guess in the past, I have never really assumed my work would be wanted by others. I've never really thought about putting it out on an open platform. After the webinar, I can see that making it accessible to others and allowing them to change it could really benefit us all. 

FRANK RICE III 4 years, 11 months ago

Melissa likewise I remember those media coordinator sharing sessions and they always impressed me with the definitions and details concerning resources.The good news for self I felt was that I was using resources in the classroom and not putting it out somewhere. Seeing the growth of simulations, web based digital resources I now see the mpacts and how we all will benefit

RENEE PEOPLES 4 years, 11 months ago

Prior to tonight's webinar, my experience with copyright and intellectual property was limited until this spring when I attended 2 sessions about #GoOpenNC at WRESA. I learned a lot at those and much of it was reviewed here. 

Previously I used it in my website and work and simply wrote the terms I wanted on my intellectual property (ie. "Permission to use as long as attribution is given.").

This is so much easier and more consistent. It really makes the whole thing so much more straight forward. However, as is my tendency, I doubted that life could be so simple. I began to wonder how it works for businesses and people in the "real" world. I found that there are possible/future Expenses of CC Licensing that I had not considered. These points rather interesting since I never considered it being irrevocable! 

STEPHANIE WALLACE 4 years, 11 months ago

I missed Webinar #1, but did attend the office hours.

1. I have actually had quite a bit because I teach for NCVPS in addition to my F2F school. Being completely digital, our NCVPS courses, announcements, etc must be attributed correctly - our mistakes are easier to identify online that many F2F instances would be. I have worked some with intellectual property as I have written curriculum.

2. I have allowed my intellectual property to be pretty open, with the exception of lesson plans and activities I have written for the North Carolina Teacher Cadet Program. I serve as Program Lead and have just completed revising and additing to the 3rd edition of our curriulum. It will be copyrighted under NCFPSC, so my work will be distiguished separately.

3. I need to spend more time looking at intellectual property. I am aware of what it means when people have me sign waivers of ownership (for example, teaching for DeVry University), but I have not paid near as much attention to much of my other work. I serve on several boards, committees, and commissions for which I write original presentations, activties, etc. I need to review the webinar again to really digest all the information. Looking at the resources, I can see better now how CC verses other licenses can impact the way a tool is used.

JEFFREY BATTEN 4 years, 11 months ago

1) In 2014, I published a Math & Science Curriculum through the NC State's publishing office. Some of my materials included figures and pictures from published sources and we decided that it was easier to just take our own photos and re-make figures from scratch. Interestingly, when I was preparing the curriculum manual, I found that many textbooks used images that originally came from other sources WITHOUT even citing the source. Pearson seemed to be the most widely plagiarized source. In retrospect, I should have just created my own material and pictures. In class, I try to always find the original source for information and provide a website link to the source. I taught my students to do the same. 

2) I have shared my curriculum materials freely with other teachers. However, for my scientific research publications, I asked that they properly cite the source. 

3)After the first session, I realized that intellectual property should be cited, and love that there are opensource ways to freely share material but also be able to have an acknowledgment of the proper source. 

Melissa Edgerton 4 years, 11 months ago

I think we just assume these companies would properly cite their sources. It's disappointing they take advantage of someone else's work and intellectual property.

ASHLEY GREENE 4 years, 11 months ago

Hi! Here are my thoughts after researching more about copyright and intellectual property. 

1) What was your experience with copyright and intellectual property prior to tonight's webinar? 

    As a librarian I teach my students about copyright a lot. However, when it comes to teaching teachers and other staff members I really struggle. I feel like I don't know ALL the rules when it comes to copyright and how they can use resources in their classroom as teachers. Tonight's webinar really gave me a lot to think about. 

2) How did you previously allow use of your intellectual property? 

    I have never copyrighted anything I have created. Sometimes when I share a Google Doc I will only give "viewing" rights, but that doesn't really keep people from creating their own copy and modifying it, I don't guess. I have not thought of it much! 

3) How has your thought process changed? Please reference both the webinar and the extra resource you looked at.

   I feel like I need to be more mindful of making sure I am using resources correctly and giving credit where credit is due. We don't always think about all of the aspects of things we find on the Internet to use when teaching, such as clipart, sound, YouTube videos, etc. I found a PDF of Copyright and Fair Use Guidelines that explains alot about printed illustrations, written words, etc. I think we need some staff development across our entire county about these things! 

https://www.xavier.edu/library/about/documents/Copyright_9-23-08.pdf

DEVONA HAMPTON-WILLIAMS 4 years, 11 months ago

1) Prior to the first webinar my experience/exposure to copyright was probably what I had learned in high school and undergrad. Which was nothing more than if it wasn't yours give credit. Also, it has been engrained that "you can go to jail" if you use someone else's stuff as your own.

2) Previously anything I put together I just kept to myself - often I had more self doubt than anything that it was worth anything. So although everyone was like WOW! I still felt as though it wasn't good enough to put out in public, so I never really shared anything. I would help others come up with things and occasionally share verbally "i did it like this" but never truly share things. 

3) My thought process has changed tremendously in reference to the use of materials. I never knew there were levels to copyright and different meanings. When reading the article from creative commons, I learned and appreciated that they put it in terms that both the licensor and licensee are able to understand. It also changes my perspective of sharing things, it is nice to know that I can specify how I want my things used and its free. I often wondered what the price tag would look like to make sure that it was "publically known" that it belonged to me. 

Lisa Prefontaine 4 years, 11 months ago

1) We learned a lot about copyright and intellectual property in our professional learning for NCVPS.

2) I have allowed use of my intellectual property through the course development of Visual Art I for NCVPS.

3) I can see how sharing intellectual property is a very productive thing and I will be sharing more in other platforms to help other teachers.

Lisa Prefontaine 4 years, 11 months ago

1) We learned a lot about copyright and intellectual property in our professional learning for NCVPS.

2) I have allowed use of my intellectual property through the course development of Visual Art I for NCVPS.

3) I can see how sharing intellectual property is a very productive thing and I will be sharing more in other platforms to help other teachers.

SHANNON WAINRIGHT 4 years, 11 months ago

1.  Prior to tonight, I have not even thought about copyright and intellectual property.

2.  We just share on Google drive or Canvas for our district to use as needed. 

3.  My wheels are turning after tonight!  As a district we have created so many resources for our district and copyright and intellectual property has never been mentioned.  In the past, we have tried to keep our documents in house.  I will say after tonights webinar and the video, I have a new perspective on sharing...

Sandra O'Brien-Duke 4 years, 11 months ago

1) What was your experience with copyright and intellectual property prior to tonight's webinar? 

NCVPS has a lot of training on copyright. Although I am familiar with cc, I seem to always pick something up new every time I review. The game was new to me and I really liked it. Playing helped to reinforce the concepts.   

2) How did you previously allow use of your intellectual property? 

I would just give it away without thinking about it, but I have to admit that I didn't like it if I wasn't given credit. 

3) How has your thought process changed? Please reference both the webinar and the extra resource you looked at.

After the webinar, I started thinking about how I can license my intellectual property so that I can still share it but also receive credit. I also realized that the license on the work can actually discourage collaboration. So, one must be mindful of the type of license they give their work.

 

GAIL HOLMES 4 years, 11 months ago

I worked at NCDPI as an educator on loan for many years prior to retiring.  I traveled the state providing professional development on copyright and other areas of technology as  requested by LEAs.  Any resource that I created, was shared with participants to use with teachers in the district; requesting only that they give NCDPI credit for creating it.  After participating in the webinar, I see the importance of using a license similar to creative commons to provide guidance on how resources that I create can be used in the schools and other public and private areas to facilitate learning.

KAREN NEWTON-CLARK 4 years, 11 months ago

1.  Prior to the session, I only had the very brief (extremely brief) training that our media coordinator provides each year.  I'm hoping our school will spend more time on this topic, considering we have not had textbooks (still using ones from 2008/2010) and have had to get a lot of our materials via the internet. 

2.  I really hadn't thought about my intellectual property before the introduction webinar.  In hindsight, I should have considering I've created a lot of items and just shared with my colleagues because at that moment we needed resources that were FREE.  I never even thought about putting a copyright on anything I created.  I even shared with colleagues allowing them to edit documents instead of just viewing them.

3.  After the intro webinar, I realized I definitely need to rethink how I allow use of items I create.  This webinar opened my eyes quite a bit.  I really need to be more vigilant in adhering to copyright and licensing.  On the night of the intro webinar, I agreed with several that felt like I was going to get a knock on my door saying the copyright/licensing police were coming to get me :)  I went online to view some of the many OER sites and found a few that I often use such as TED and Curriki.  I usually don't print the response sheets that go with the TED talk, but I did print one this year.  Fortunatley, it was for a motivational club I was in charge of I didn't print copies for any class other than the one I was teaching.  It is fully licensed though.  Again, I will need to be very mindful of how I use other's resources.

JULIE CLARK-MCCOY 4 years, 11 months ago

1) What was your experience with copyright and intellectual property prior to tonight's webinar? 

I have had little experience with copyright and intellectual property prior to the webinar. I knew what it was and to give credit to those whose work I used from my writing in graduate school; however I never really knew about all the different kinds of copyright and intellectual property types. 

2) How did you previously allow use of your intellectual property? 

I shared my work freely with my fellow coaches and teachers in my county through Google Drive, they are often free to view it but not edit it unless they make a copy. 

3) How has your thought process changed? Please reference both the webinar and the extra resource you looked at.

My thought process has changed in that I see the importance in looking and paying attention to the copyright notifications at the bottom of resources I give to teachers and that teachers use now, but also the importantance in thinking about how I would like items and resources I create to be used and copied. 

Julie Halpert 4 years, 11 months ago

1) What was your experience with copyright and intellectual property prior to tonight's webinar? 

I spend a great deal of time discussing copyright and intellectual property with my students. This way they understand why we can use some material and not all material. 

2) How did you previously allow use of your intellectual property? 

I just used my material in my PLC and with teammates. 

3) How has your thought process changed? Please reference both the webinar and the extra resource you looked at.

I think the resources and notifications make it easier and reinforces the importances of copyright!