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  • Newberry Digital Collections for the Classroom
The American Renaissance in Context
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With this digital collection, students will explore the wider, literary context for the canonical works of the American Renaissance. Students will consider the following essential questions: 1. What was the literary context in which canonical American Renaissance writers wrote and published? 2. What kinds of literature were popular in the mid-nineteenth-century United States? 3. How did now-canonical writers engage or respond to popular literary forms?

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Newberry Digital Collections for the Classroom
Date Added:
04/17/2017
The Anti-Slavery Movement in Chicago and Illinois
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With this digital collection, students will explore the actions taken by abolitionists in Illinois and their reactions to national policies. Students will consider the following questions as they review the documents: 1. What motivated the actions of abolitionists in Illinois? 2. How did abolitionists attempt to transform public opinion on the issue of slavery? 3. How did the abolitionist movement evolve and respond to national events that shook the nation in the 1850s?

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Newberry Digital Collections for the Classroom
Date Added:
04/17/2017
Anti-Statism in U.S. History
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With this digital collection, the student will explore conflicts over the exercise of State power at three important junctures in U.S. history: the Revolution and national founding, the Civil War, and World War II. At each of these formative moments in national history, some Americans challenged—while others defended—the authority of the federal government over individual citizens and states. It is important to note that, in these documents, anti-statism does not emerge as a coherent ideology. Rather it includes many different forms of opposition to centralized authority, from reasoned debate to organized rebellion to mob violence. What does emerge is a long and varied history of American anti-statist thought and sentiment.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Newberry Digital Collections for the Classroom
Date Added:
04/05/2017
Art and Exploration in the American West and Mexico
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With this digital collection, students will review maps, drawings, and paintings that exemplify nineteenth-century America and Mexico, from the first expeditions up the Missouri River, to the development of everyday life along the Mississippi, to the discovery of Yellowstone and the establishment of the national park, to representations of the people and natural resources of Mexico.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Newberry Digital Collections for the Classroom
Date Added:
04/05/2017
Art and Exploration of the Poles
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With this digital collection, students will review documents including five works of art, each offering a different approach to the representation of Polar exploration, from a first encounter between Europeans and Inuit to a vast arctic landscape to the scientific examination of the natural world to the celebration of the explorer as national hero.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Newberry Digital Collections for the Classroom
Date Added:
04/05/2017
Art of Conflict: Portraying American Indians, 1850-1900
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With this digital collection, students will explore the relationships that existed between representations of American Indians in art and the histories of U.S. settlement.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Newberry Digital Collections for the Classroom
Date Added:
04/05/2017
Caste and Politics in the Struggle for Mexican Independence
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With this digital collection, students will explore documents that include accounts of Mexico as it was under Spanish rule, representations of the struggle for independence, and descriptions of the country after independence.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Newberry Digital Collections for the Classroom
Date Added:
04/05/2017
Chicago and the Great Migration, 1915-1950
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With this digital collection, students will explore the subject of Chicago and the Great Migration through four specific topics: the race riots of 1919, travel, literary culture, and community organizing. Historian Arnold R. Hirsch explains in The Encyclopedia of Chicago that the covenants were “rare in Chicago before the 1920s, their widespread use followed the Great Migration of southern blacks.”

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Newberry Digital Collections for the Classroom
Date Added:
04/05/2017
The Crusades: Motivations, Administration, and Cultural Influence
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With this digital collection, students will examine documents that offer insight into the religious and social motivations and benefits for undertaking a crusade, as well as a glimpse into the more mundane administrative details required to make this transcontinental excursion to the Holy Land. They also suggest how the Crusades were both commemorated and criticized in literature and history for centuries after they had ended. Students will consider the following questions as they review the documents: 1. What were Western Christian religious beliefs, political relationships, and personal values during the Middle Ages? 2. How did the motives, organization, and effects of the Crusades change over time? 3. How have writers from the eleventh century on criticized the Crusaders’ goals and actions?

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Newberry Digital Collections for the Classroom
Date Added:
04/17/2017
Dissent and Democracy in Modern American History
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With this digital collection, students will explore the questions What is dissent? and What role has dissent played in the development of American democracy? The collection of documents are case studies representing four different aspects of dissent. These case studies, in their variety, allow us to consider the different forms that dissent might take, and the different paths that these movements could follow within national history.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Newberry Digital Collections for the Classroom
Date Added:
04/05/2017
The French Colonial Empire, 1500-1800
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With this digital collection, students will review documents that survey the many parts of the world swept up in French imperialism during the early modern period (1500–1800), and the many ways the French empire influenced their histories. Students will consider the following essential questions as they review the documents: 1. What were the motivations behind France’s presence in different parts of the world? How did French motives change from place to place, and over time? 2. How did French colonists see native peoples in North America, the Caribbean, and Africa? How did these peoples interact with the French? 3. How did the pieces of France’s empire fit together? Were they a single, coherent system?

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Newberry Digital Collections for the Classroom
Date Added:
04/17/2017
Home Front: The Visual Culture of the Civil War North
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With this digital collection, students will explore how visual culture shaped the meaning and experience of the Civil War home front. This digital collection is based on the 2013 Newberry Library and Terra Foundation for American Art exhibition Home Front: Daily Life in the Civil War North, curated by Peter John Brownlee and Daniel Greene.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Newberry Digital Collections for the Classroom
Date Added:
04/05/2017
Imagining the American West in the Late Nineteenth Century
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With this digital collection, students will explore the idea of the Wild West and its influence on American identity in order to answer the following questions: How has the West been imagined as both America’s manifest destiny and a wild frontier? In what ways do American Indian art and literature challenge these popular narratives of the West?

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Newberry Digital Collections for the Classroom
Date Added:
04/05/2017
Immigration and Citizenship in the United States, 1865-1924
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With this digital collection, students will explore the subject of immigration in U.S. history with particular attention to the two and a half decades from 1890 to the start of World War I.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Newberry Digital Collections for the Classroom
Date Added:
04/05/2017
The Jungle and the Community: Workers and Reformers in Turn-of-the-Century Chicago
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With this digital collection, students will review documents that focus on neighborhood and community life for workers such as the ones Sinclair portrays in The Jungle. Students will consider the following essential questions as they review the documents: 1. What did it mean to live in the neighborhood of the Union Stock Yard around 1900? What conditions did workers experience outside of the packing plants, in their homes and streets? 2. How did the Back of the Yards neighborhood compare to other Chicago neighborhoods at this time? In what ways was the neighborhood connected to or cut off from the rest of the city? 3. Who lived in Back of the Yards around 1900? What was the neighborhood’s demographic makeup? 4. How did researchers and reformers approach the stockyard neighborhood? What problems did they identify? What solutions did they propose? Does it matter that, like Sinclair, they came from outside the communities they wanted to change? 5. In what ways do the documents created by sociologists and urban reformers reframe or complicate Sinclair’s representation of the lives of meatpacking workers?

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Newberry Digital Collections for the Classroom
Date Added:
04/17/2017
The Legacy of the Middle Ages in the Renaissance and Beyond
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With this digital collection, students will examine the foundations that were established during the Middle Ages. Medieval Europe bequeathed a legacy to the Renaissance and beyond that continues to influence our thought, art, institutions, and culture. Students will consider the following essential questions as they review the documents: 1. Why might Renaissance and later historians want to envision an abrupt difference between their own times and the medieval past? 2. How do medieval manuscripts help us to understand the “long view” of the development of many modern institutions?

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Newberry Digital Collections for the Classroom
Date Added:
04/17/2017
Lincoln, the North, and the Question of Emancipation
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With this digital collection, students will use documents to explore the meaning of slavery and emancipation in the North around the time of the Civil War, and understand the context for Lincoln’s own evolving position.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Newberry Digital Collections for the Classroom
Date Added:
04/17/2017
Literature of the American Civil War
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With this digital collection, students will explore the ways that literary culture shaped the meaning of the war for people who lived through it. Students will be asked to answer the following essential questions: 1. What literature was published and read during the Civil War? 2. How did literature shape the meaning of the war? How did writers and readers turn to literature to make sense of the war itself and of the profound changes it brought to the nation? 3. How might reading the literature of the Civil War lead us to think in new ways about American literary history?

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Newberry Digital Collections for the Classroom
Date Added:
04/17/2017
Living in British Colonial India, 1750-1850
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With this digital collection, students will examine advice manuals, letters, cartoons and other materials to explore the common features of colonial life and what Britons setting out for the Indian empire expected to find there, hoped to achieve, and the challenges they faced. Students will answer the following questions: 1. What do the different documents in this collection tell you about why Britons in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries ventured out into the Empire? 2. How did the perspective on the British Empire differ between people who lived and worked in India versus people who remained in the British Isles? 3. How did Britons perceive native peoples? 4. Do any of these documents give you an idea of why England wanted to create an empire in the first place?

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Newberry Digital Collections for the Classroom
Date Added:
04/17/2017
Mapping Chicago and the Midwest, 1688-1906
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With this digital collection, students will explore the early history of Chicago and the American Midwest through maps. Students will consider the following questions as they review the documents: 1. How can we use maps to tell the early history of Chicago and the Midwest? How has the region been represented in maps over time? 2. What are the natural geographic features that define the region? 3. Who inhabited the region around Chicago between the seventeenth and twentieth centuries? What kinds of human settlements developed there at different times? How have maps been used by different empires and nations to secure control of the region?

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Newberry Digital Collections for the Classroom
Date Added:
04/17/2017
Maps and the Beginnings of Colonial North America
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With this digital collection, students will examine documents that include maps of varying styles and purposes made by the diverse peoples that created colonial North America. Together, these documents illustrate the utility of maps as historical sources and, more specifically, illuminate colonial North America’s multicultural and contested origins. Students will consider the following questions as they review the documents: 1. How do maps challenge our perceptions of European and American Indian relations during the colonial period? 2. What role did cartography, or mapmaking, play in the power struggles between Europeans and American Indians? How did maps allow both European and indigenous people to gain, administer, legitimize, and codify power in colonial North America? 3. How did mapmakers adjust their maps to suit different needs and audiences during the colonial period? 4. How did the multicultural origins of cartographic knowledge of North America alter contemporary ideas about space, or the course of colonial expansion? 5. How can maps help us understand the past in ways that other historical documents cannot?

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Newberry Digital Collections for the Classroom
Date Added:
04/17/2017
The Medieval Spice Trade
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With this digital collection, students will learn how European merchants sought out spices from Asia, traveling dangerous routes through the Middle East and Africa. Students will consider the following essential questions as they review the documents: 1. Why were spices so valuable in medieval Europe? Who determined the value? 2. How is the value of spices different from the price of spices? How did the value impact prices? 3. How were spices used by medieval Europeans? How does this differ from the use of spices today?

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Newberry Digital Collections for the Classroom
Date Added:
04/17/2017
The New Deal in Chicago and the Midwest
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With this digital collection, students will examine documents exploring several New Deal programs, highlighting how Chicago and Midwestern-based workers negotiated new welfare reforms. It provides a snapshot of how new agencies reshuffled family relations, mobilized immigrants, and sometimes reached across racial barriers. With a particular focus on labor and employment, these documents represent a broad range of responses to President Roosevelt’s policies, demonstrating the praise and protest elicited as policymakers established a growing welfare state. Students will consider the following essential questions as they review the documents: 1. Who benefited from New Deal labor reforms? 2. What effect did new social programs have on Chicagoans across class, racial, and ethnic divides? 3. How did the politics of the New Deal change ordinary Americans’ relationship to the federal government?

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Newberry Digital Collections for the Classroom
Date Added:
04/17/2017
Olaudah Equiano and the Eighteenth-Century Debate over Africa and the Slave Trade
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With this digital collection, students will review primary sources that develop the historical context for the debates over Africa and the slave trade. Students will consider the following questions as they review the documents: 1. How did eighteenth-century European and American writers portray Africans? How are these representations shaped by the writers’ own experiences and convictions? 2. What arguments did eighteenth-century writers make in support of and in opposition to the slave trade? How are these arguments shaped by each writer’s understanding of African civilization? 3. How does Olaudah Equiano contribute to these debates? How does he portray his own experiences of slavery and freedom? How does he define his identity as African, British, and Christian?

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Newberry Digital Collections for the Classroom
Date Added:
04/17/2017
Other Americans and the American Revolution
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With this digital collection, students will review documents that serve to illustrate various perspectives on the causes and effects of the American Revolution. Students will answer the following essential questions: 1. How did the American Revolution affect different groups of people? 2. What are the various arguments put forth as to the cause of and reasons for the American Revolution? How do the arguments reflect the group that made them? 3. What are the different interests of each group? What stake do they have in the war? 4. Think about a definition of the word Americans. What groups of people are considered Americans at this time? Who is considered American today?

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Newberry Digital Collections for the Classroom
Date Added:
04/17/2017
Perspectives on the Mexican Revolution
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With this digital collection, students will review documents that offer different perspectives on the meaning and experience of the revolution. Students will be asked to consider the following essential questions: 1. What social conditions and conflicts contributed to the revolution? How do the writers and artists represented in this collection explain their support of or opposition to the revolution? 2. How did the United States seek to influence events in Mexico? How did Americans in Mexico represent their experience of the revolution? 3. How did Mexican artists respond to the revolution? What visual record did they create of the people who led and participated in the war?

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Newberry Digital Collections for the Classroom
Date Added:
04/17/2017
Picturing the Century of Progress: The 1933-34 Chicago World's Fair
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With this digital collection, students will review documents depicting Chicago's second world's fair, A Century of Progress International Exposition. Essential Questions 1. What was unique about the 1933-34 Chicago World’s Fair? 2. How did the creators of the Century of Progress illustrate and enact the fair’s theme of progress

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Newberry Digital Collections for the Classroom
Date Added:
04/17/2017
Religious Change and Print Culture in the Reformation
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With this digital collection, students will review a small sample of the different ways in which religious change drove the development of print culture. Through them, students will gain a better understanding of the immense challenges caused by religious change in this period, and the different ways in which print culture was shaped and re-shaped in order to meet them. Students will keep the following questions in mind as they review the documents: 1. Why did so many religious thinkers and leaders seek to solve the problems they encountered through the printed word? 2. What is the intended audience for these works? How did the authors and creators try to interact with that audience through the materials they produced? 3. How does the changing nature of print culture reflect the changing nature of religion during this period? 4. How does the religious printing market reflect the increasingly globalized world in the early modern period? 5. What parallels are there between early modern print culture and modern mass media?

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Newberry Digital Collections for the Classroom
Date Added:
04/17/2017
Representing the American Revolution, 1768–1893
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With this digital collection, students will examine documents that explore representations of the American Revolution from its earliest moments through the 125 years that followed. The documents include visual representations—maps, illustrations—as well as a variety of written texts—political, literary, musical—created by people of different social status for different audiences. Taken together, these documents encourage students to think in new ways about the history and meaning of the Revolution. Students will consider the following questions as they review the documents: 1. How did people interpret the events of the Revolution in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries? 2. How did the meaning of the Revolution change over time? 3. What conflicts or contradictions exist between different representations of the Revolution? 4. What are the reasons for the differences between various accounts of the Revolution?

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Newberry Digital Collections for the Classroom
Date Added:
04/17/2017
Shakespeare's Romans: Politics and Ethics in Julius Caesar and Coriolanus
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With this digital collection, students will examine documents that develop the context for Shakespeare’s Roman plays. They include excerpts from his primary source on classical Rome, representations of Rome by other Renaissance writers, and, finally, interpretations of Shakespeare’s characters by artists from later centuries. Students will consider the following questions as they review the documents: 1. How did Shakespeare’s contemporaries represent classical Rome? What relationships do they suggest between ancient Rome and Renaissance England? Which issues does Rome seem to raise for Renaissance writers or allow them to explore? 2. In what ways do Shakespeare’s plays reinforce or differ from other Renaissance representations of Rome? Which issues does he call attention to, revise, or adapt in his retelling of Roman history? 3. How did artists portray Shakespeare’s characters in the centuries that followed the original staging of Julius Caesar and Coriolanus? What about these plays seems to have mattered most to subsequent audiences?

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Newberry Digital Collections for the Classroom
Date Added:
04/17/2017
Shakespeare's The Tempest and Utopias of the European Renaissance
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With this digital collection, students will examine documents that demonstrate some of the ways in which Renaissance writers and artists imagined the New World and its utopian possibilities. Students will keep the following questions in mind as tthey review the documents: 1. How does the exploration of the Americas contribute to the European imagination of an ideal society? 2. What qualities do these writers identify as the basis of an ideal society? 3. How do these writers use representations of Native American and utopian societies to critique their own European societies? What social problems do they perceive to be most urgent? 4. Are native people idealized or denigrated in these representations? Do they inhabit a world that is preferable to the Europeans’ world?

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Newberry Digital Collections for the Classroom
Date Added:
04/17/2017
Slavery, Civil War, and the "New Birth of Freedom"
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With this digital collection, students will examine documents that bring together arguments for emancipation written before, during, and after the Civil War. The collection allows students to trace the evolution of abolitionist arguments as well as to examine conflicts among writers over what emancipation would entail. Students will keep the following questions in mind as they review the documents: 1. What arguments did writers make before the Civil War for the abolition of slavery? How did they frame their appeals in moral, social, political, and economic terms? 2. How did the war’s purpose shift from “saving the union” to destroying slavery? 3. What would freedom mean for former slaves, for Southern society, and for the nation as a whole, according to various writers both before and after the war?

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Newberry Digital Collections for the Classroom
Date Added:
04/17/2017
The Struggle for Civil Rights in the Urban North
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With this digital collection, students will review documents exploring relationships between the Great Migration and the civil rights struggle in northern cities and, especially, Chicago from the 1920s through the 1960s. Students will consider the following essential questions as they review the documents: 1 What does de facto segregation in the urban North look like? How is it similar and different from de jure segregation in the South? 2. How did African Americans respond to the segregation and racism they faced in the North? 3. How did the civil rights movement in the urban North connect to the movement in the South?

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Newberry Digital Collections for the Classroom
Date Added:
04/17/2017
Subject to Citizen, Kingdom to Nation: Changing Notions of Identity in the Age of the French Revolution
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With this digital collection, students will examine sources that speak to some of the ways French people brought about—or resisted—the transition from monarchy to republic and from subject to citizen. Students will consider the following questions as they review the documents: 1. How did French writers and artists represent the king and the country’s traditional hierarchy before and during the Revolution? 2. What did citizenship mean in the new republic? 3. How did ordinary people as well as the government use print publications to influence events during the Revolution? 4. What impact did the political ideals of the French Revolution have on social customs?

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Newberry Digital Collections for the Classroom
Date Added:
04/17/2017
Subversives in the City: Responses to Political Radicalism in Chicago
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With this digital collection, students will examine documents representing some of the milestones in Chicago’s history of political radicalism from the Haymarket Affair of 1886 through the Palmer raids of 1920 into the McCarthy era of the 1950s. Students will consider the following questions as they review the documents: 1. What were the goals of the political radicals represented here? How did they try to accomplish those goals? Did their actions increase or weaken public support of their ideals? 2. What were the goals of the officials and organizations that sought to police or monitor political radicals? What were their methods? Was their treatment of radicals a form of persecution or not? 3. How do writers throughout these documents define the concepts of freedom, justice, and security? In what ways do these ideals conflict with each other? 4. Who or what constitutes a threat to the community, the city, or the nation? On what grounds does a person, idea, or group constitute a threat? How should such threats be handled? 5. How do definitions of and responses to political radicalism evolve from the 1880s through the 1950s?

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Newberry Digital Collections for the Classroom
Date Added:
04/17/2017
Trade, Diplomacy, and China's Modern Transformation
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With this digital collection, students will review maps, correspondence, editorial cartoons, and other materials to explore the interplay between foreign trade and diplomacy in China, as well as how China’s economic and diplomatic ties to the outside world have shaped its modern history. Students will consider the following essential questions as they review the documents: 1. How did China seek to control its place within international systems of trade? 2. How have China’s domestic politics influenced its foreign affairs? 3. How have Western traders and diplomats interacted with China?

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Newberry Digital Collections for the Classroom
Date Added:
05/01/2017
Treason or Loyal Opposition? The Copperheads and Dissent During the Civil War
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With this digital collection, students will learn about the Copperheads. The provided documents offer perspectives on the Northern wing of the Democratic Party, which opposed the Civil War. The collection documents were both published in New York and indicate the Copperheads’ prominence in that city. Students will consider the following questions as they review the documents: 1. Describe the characters and symbols in the Harper’s Weeklycartoon. Who do they represent? 2. Explain the cartoon’s title. How does the title contrast with the image in the cartoon? According to the cartoonist, how are the Copperheads’ attempting to achieve peace? 3. Examine The Copperhead Catechism. What is a catechism? How is it used? 4. What are the beliefs of the Copperheads, as outlined in this catechism? 5. Does the author of this catechism support the Copperhead cause? Explain.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Newberry Digital Collections for the Classroom
Date Added:
05/01/2017
Tudor Visual Culture
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With this digital collection, students will explore the visual culture of Tudor England, a rich blend of Continental Renaissance Classicism and native English Medieval traditions. It encompasses the visual arts like painting and architecture, as well as new developments in print culture, performance, and pageantry. It is colored by dramatic swings between Catholicism and Protestantism, expanded educational opportunities, and by new discoveries across the Atlantic. Students will consider the following questions as they review the documents: 1. Why was the sixteenth century such a tumultuous time in English history? 2. How does studying visual culture help us to understand history better?

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Newberry Digital Collections for the Classroom
Date Added:
05/01/2017
Women on the Move: Gender and Mobility in American Culture, 1890–1950
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With this digital collection, students will review documents which develop the historical and cultural context for the novels My Antonia by Willa Cather and The Street by Ann Petry. It includes representations of women on the move, both socially and spatially, in such different contexts as transportation, dance, literary culture, and the Great Migration. Students will consider the following questions as they review the documents: 1. In what ways do these documents associate mobility with freedom? What kinds of freedom does movement provide? 2. In what ways do these documents associate mobility with setting aside social mores or subverting established norms? 3. How do these documents explore the relationships between physical and social mobility? When do the two forms of mobility, one literal and one figurative, correspond? When do they diverge or come into conflict? 4. How do understandings of gender influence these representations of mobility? Does women’s mobility have the same stakes or consequences as men’s?

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Newberry Digital Collections for the Classroom
Date Added:
05/01/2017