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1961 in Mississippi: Beyond the Freedom Riders Lesson Plan
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1961 in Mississippi: Beyond the Freedom Riders Lesson Plan

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In this lesson, students will explore how, prior to the involvement of national initiatives in the 1960s, such as the Freedom Rides, local people worked to bring an end to discrimination in their communities. These efforts were led out of public view in private homes, churches, and small businesses, and thus, the early local leaders of the Civil Rights Movement are often overlooked in history. Students will learn how the work of these local leaders laid the foundation for national organizations such as SNCC and CORE to further facilitate the fight for civil rights within Mississippi as well as the nation.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Mississippi History Now
Date Added:
08/26/2017
Medgar Evers and the Origins of the Civil Rights Movement in Mississippi lesson plan
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Medgar Evers and the Origins of the Civil Rights Movement in Mississippi lesson plan

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In this lesson from Mississippi History Now, students will focus on the life of Medgar Evers through readings and fillm viewing. Through this work, students will consider the events of Mr. Evers’s early life and how they impacted his development, examine the beliefs and values that formed the basis of his work, and reflect on the merits of individual efforts to bring about positive changes.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Mississippi History Now
Date Added:
08/26/2017
On Violence and Nonviolence: The Civil Rights Movement in Mississippi lesson plan
Conditions of Use:
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On Violence and Nonviolence: The Civil Rights Movement in Mississippi lesson plan

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In this lesson from Mississippi History Now, students will determine how violence and nonviolence were used as primary “weapons” in the civil rights movement, as well as evaluate the significance of “public exposure” to the success of the civil rights movement. Students will also explore the dilemma of public nonviolence versus private violence faced by many civil rights workers and explore the significance of nonviolent protest in the civil rights movement.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Mississippi History Now
Date Added:
08/26/2017
Voices of Katrina Lesson Plan
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Voices of Katrina Lesson Plan

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In this lesson, students will work with partners in order to analyze an oral history found in this Mississippi History Now article, “Voices of Katrina.” Students can read oral histories, listen to its audio links online, as well as analyze artwork created by Mississippi students about Hurricane Katrina. Through the assistance of the Mississippi Humanities Council and involved scholars, The Center for Oral History and Cultural Heritage at the University of Southern Mississippi began recording the oral histories of Hurricane Katrina survivors not long after the storm ravaged the Mississippi Gulf Coast and caused destruction throughout the state. It is through these oral histories that students can develop a greater understanding of the human impact of one of the worst natural disasters in American history.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Mississippi History Now
Date Added:
08/03/2017
WPA Slave Narratives Lesson Plan
Conditions of Use:
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WPA Slave Narratives Lesson Plan

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In this lesson, students will read and evaluate various slave narratives that were documented during the Great Depression as a part of the Works Progress Administration. Students will consider the method of gathering the info, the bias of the interviewer, and the reliability of the memory of the interviewer him or herself (most participants had been freed seven decades before the interviews) in assessing the meaning and significance of the narratives. Ultimately, students will explore the guiding question of what the narratives reveal about what it was like to be an American slave.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Mississippi History Now
Date Added:
08/26/2017