Author:
Melody Casey
Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Level:
Lower Primary, Upper Primary
Grade:
2, 3
Tags:
GEDB, Global Education
License:
Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial
Language:
English

GEDB Understanding Time Zones: What Time Is It? (Lesson 1 of 3)

GEDB Understanding Time Zones: What Time Is It? (Lesson 1 of 3)

Overview

In this lesson, students will use analog clocks hung in the classroom and digital clocks found through online research to tell time to the nearest minute in a variety of cities around the world. Students will begin to recognize that times are different across the world, particularly that the hour changes from city to city but the minutes stay the same (with only a few exceptions). This lesson is designed for use in the AIG (academically and intellectually gifted) classroom; students are pulled out of their regular classroom twice a week for enrichment instruction in their area of giftedness. This lesson was developed by Meredith Ewbank as part of their completion of the North Carolina Global Educator Digital Badge program. This lesson plan has been vetted at the local and state level for standards alignment, Global Education focus, and content accuracy.

Lesson Plan

Description

In this lesson, students will use analog clocks hung in the classroom and digital clocks found through online research to tell time to the nearest minute in a variety of cities around the world. Students will begin to recognize that times are different across the world, particularly that the hour changes from city to city but the minutes stay the same (with only a few exceptions). This lesson is designed for use in the AIG (academically and intellectually gifted) classroom; students are pulled out of their regular classroom twice a week for enrichment instruction in their area of giftedness.

 

Content

Student Engagement/Motivation

Ask students: What time is it? (Students respond by referencing a clock in the classroom). Based on the time of day, remind students that they have already eaten breakfast and/or lunch but it's too early for lunch and/or dinner. Then ask students, That time do you think it is in California? Point out California on a map/globe (wall map, globe, or projected map). Why do you think that (it's the same/different/that time)? What time do you think it is in China (point out China on a globe so that students see that it's across the world)?

Ask compelling questions: Is it the same time everywhere in the world? Why or why not? (students may know that it's not because the sun only shines on half of the world at one time, but they also may not have thought about this leading to the time being different in different places).

 

Learning Targets and Criteria for Success

Learning Targets:

I can tell time on an analog clock to the nearest minute.

I can write times on an analog clock to the nearest minute.

Criteria for Success:

I will read the time in different cities from an analog clock.

I will conduct research to determine the time in different cities across the world.

I will record the time in a variety of cities on an analog clock to display on a map in the classroom.

 

Supplies/Resources

Classroom display:

posters of maps of all continents with cities

analog clocks displaying the time of one city from each continent (hung with the appropriate continent poster and labeled with the name of the city, country)

Materials:

Computer with internet access for the teacher

Projector (optional but recommended)

https://time.is/ 

"What Time Is It?" handout (1 per student)

https://www.brainpop.com/science/space/timezones/ (subscription required, video is optional)

 

Learning Tasks and Practice

The teacher will project/share https://time.is for students to see. This website shows what time it is all over the world at the instant that you initially open the website. Ask students: What do you notice about the times in different places? What stays the same? What changes? Allow students to name the time in different places and share what they are surprised by. This is an informal exploration.

The teacher will refer students to the maps hung in the classroom and the coordinating clocks. The students should tell the time in each of the different cities represented by a clock. The teacher should note students' ability to tell time to the nearest minute and reteach this skill as needed.

The teacher will pass out the "What Time Is It?" handout to students. The students will start by working with a partner to record information about their own time, including the name of their city and current time; time should be recorded as a digital time and analog time.

The teacher should open https://time.is/ on his/her computer and either allow students to see the teacher device or project the website on the board; students may use their own devices, but this is optional. The students will use https://time.is/ to choose three other cities around the world that interest them; these cities should also be included on the maps hung in the classroom. As an alternative for a larger group, students may use the analog clocks that should be hung with the maps on the wall. Students should record the name of the city, country and digital and analog time. The teacher should review students' analog times as they work and provide feedback. Students should be allowed to make corrections.

The students will cut apart their time cards for the different cities and hang them on the maps in the classroom at the appropriate location. In order to facilitate this process, the teacher should restrict students' choice of cities to ones that are labeled on the maps hung in the classroom.

 

Technological Engagement

Computer with internet access for the teacher

Projector (optional but recommended)

https://time.is/ 

www.brainpop.com/science/space/timezones/ (subscription required, optional)

 

Collecting and Documenting Evidence of Learning

Formative Assessment: The teacher should make mental notes throughout the lesson regarding students' ability to tell and write time to the nearest minute. Each opportunity for students to tell time is an opportunity for formative assessment of students' ability to tell time.

The students' completion of the analog clocks showing the time in different cities across the world should be the main source of formative assessment.

 

Student Self-Reflection and Action Steps

Students have opportunity to work with a partner to discuss their analog times; through this discussion, students will be able to reflect on their work and determine whether or not they need to make changes to their clocks.

 

Feedback/Instructional Adjustments

The teacher should monitor students' ability to record time on an analog clock and provide feedback through questioning; these questions are designed to help students reflect on their own work. If students are unable to modify their work based on teacher questioning, the teacher may need to be more explicit and reteach how to tell time to the nearest minute.

Which hand is the hour hand? the minute hand? How do you tell them apart?

When does the hour hand point exactly to the hour? Why is it sometimes between two hours?

How do you count the minutes around the clock?

 

Extended Learning Opportunities 

This lesson can be extended to include a discussion of the scientific reasons that time is different in different cities. This may include a visual/model using the globe and the "sun" (a flashlight) that illuminates half of the Earth. Teachers may also use the "Time Zones" video from Brain Pop (subscription required) [ [www.brainpop.com/science/space/timezones/] to pique students' curiosity about other aspects of time zones, such as the connection between 24 time zones and 24 hours in a day or lines of longitude. The teacher may also extend student learning to include telling time with Roman Numerals on the clock face instead of traditional numbers.

 

Teacher Reflection of Learning

During this lesson, students show a great curiosity about the idea of time being different in different times. If the teacher (or a student) brings up the idea of where exactly the time changes, the students show an intial understanding of time zones by giggling at (or otherwise reacting to) the idea of living near where the time changes and crossing from one time to another regularly. Students show their understanding of the skill of telling time through their written work; their global understanding shows through discussion and their reaction!