Author:
Melody Casey
Subject:
English Language Arts, Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Level:
Middle School
Grade:
7
Tags:
  • GEDB
  • Global Education
    License:
    Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial
    Language:
    English

    Education Standards

    GEDB Human Rights: Rights That Matter to Me (Lesson 2 of 8)

    GEDB Human Rights: Rights That Matter to Me (Lesson 2 of 8)

    Overview

    In this lesson, students will begin to consider which human rights are important to them and why. Students will meet global education goals from NCDPI including recognizing perspectives, investigating the world and communicating ideas about what is important to them. Note: This lesson was created in accordance with the 7th Grade Social Studies Essential Standards and VIF/Participate Global Competence Indicators for Grade 7. For more information about VIF/Participate and these indicators, please visit https://www.participate.com/. This lesson was developed by Lindsey Gallagher as part of their completion of the North Carolina Global Educator Digital Badge program. This lesson plan has been vetted at the local and state level for standards alignment, Global Education focus, and content accuracy.            

    Lesson Plan

    Description

    In this lesson, students will begin to consider which human rights are important to them and why. Students will meet global education goals from NCDPI including recognizing perspectives, investigating the world and communicating ideas about what is important to them. Note: This lesson was created in accordance with the 7th Grade Social Studies Essential Standards and VIF/Participate Global Competence Indicators for Grade 7. For more information about VIF/Participate and these indicators, please visit https://www.participate.com/.


    Content

    Student Engagement/Motivation

    Students started this unit by learning and discussing what a human right is. In this lesson students will investigate the most respected document on the topic - the Universal Declaration of Human Rights which was created by the United Nations. Reading and discussing these will help students better understand what these rights mean and which ones stick out to them as most important. This is relevant to students because they are able to identify what matters to them based on past experiences they’ve had, causes/issues that matter to them, etc.


    Learning Targets and Criteria for Success

    Learning Targets:

    1. I can summarize and discuss the rights listed in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.
    2. I can identify and share 5 rights that are most important to me and why.

     

    Criteria for Success:

    1. I will be able to summarize what key human rights listed in the Universal Declaration of Human rights mean.
    2. I will identify and share 5 rights that are important to me based on the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.
    3. I will identify connections between human rights and at least 1 historical event.

    Supplies/Resources

    1. CNN Student News (or other student news source such as Newsela, Dogo News, etc.)
    2. Copies of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights for each student (able to be printed from the following link or projected on the board for students - Universal Declaration of Human Rights Abridged for Youth - Youth for Human Rights)
    3. Slideshow with instructions for students to identify rights that are important to them (create from instructions below)
    4. Unit vocabulary sheet
    5. Student Learning/Reflection Log
    6. Optional: Human Rights video via Vimeo showing human rights
    7. Optional: Sample human rights/current event article from Newsela on Rights of Children

    Learning Tasks and Practice

    Activity One

    1. The teacher will use a clip from CNN10, a Newsela, Dogo News or other article that is chosen by the teacher to create a connection between a current event around the world and human rights (example: Newsela article on Rights of Children).  The teacher will let students discuss the clip or article first in groups and then have each group share the most interesting thing they talked about.  What possible connections to human rights were there?

     

    Activity Two

    1. After several minutes discussing the article/clip and connections to human rights, the teacher will hand out student copies of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.  This document is found on the Youth for Human Rights website. It is also possible to download a version of this document. The teacher will ask students some of the following questions as they are looking it over: Does it surprise students that there are 30?  Is that more than expected?  Less than expected?  Why?
    2. Students will look through the list for a few minutes on their own and then at the teacher's discretion, they will point out specific ones that might be confusing for students so that the meaning can be clarified.  For example, articles 6, 9, 14, 20, 27 from the Universal Declaration of Human Rights may be particularly confusing or need an example given.  

     

    Activity Three

    1. The teacher will give students the following directions: Look through the list of 30 human rights and identify the five that are most important to you.  Rank these from 1 to 5.  One is the most important.  Students will think about experiences they have had, activities they are involved in, values and what is important to them in life so that they can stand by what they believe.  Students will need be prepared to share why these are important to them.
    2. The teacher will model this with students first with the first 2-3 articles.  The teacher will model with teacher talk about what each of those articles mean and why they are important the teacher and/or to others.  The teacher will give an example of why that right (or another) is important to them.
    3. Students will have 5-10 minutes to identify what rights are most important to them and any ideas/notes they might want to make for themselves on why they are important.
    4. Students will share in small groups or with a partner which rights they chose as the most important and why.  The teacher will circulate and aide students as needed with understanding certain rights and sharing their thoughts and opinions.
    5. After students have shared, the teacher will ask the class WHY they believe certain rights may have been added to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.  What could have happened or has happened that students are aware of that would lead a group of people to believe that something is essential as a human right?

     

    Activity Four

    1. To wrap up this lesson, the teacher will have students respond to the reflection question in their log.  What were some of the rights that students thought were most important and why?  Do students think there are any rights that are missing from this list?  Would students add any others?  Why?  At this time students may also add definitions for words they came across that they think were important. In this wrap up and the earlier discussion students were able to communicate and see others' perspectives and ideas.

    Technological Engagement

    Presentation with list/projection of Universal Declaration of Human Rights


    Collecting and Documenting Evidence of Learning

    Formative Assessments:

    1. Students identifying and ranking the most important rights to them and then stating why
    2. Partner/Group/Class discussion of Universal Declaration of Human Rights

    Summative Assessments:

    1. Identification/ranking of important human rights
    2. Learning/Reflection log
    3. Vocabulary sheet

    Student Self-Reflection and Action Steps

    Review of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, ranking 5 most important, class discussion, learning/reflection log


    Feedback/Instructional Adjustments

    Remember that this could go over two periods (40 minutes each) depending on where conversation goes in the teacher's class.


    Extended Learning Opportunities

    The teacher will use small groups discuss confusing rights.  Students will create a slideshow of their top 5 rights.  


    Teacher Reflection of Learning

    This lesson is a bit fluid in how long it might go depending on how students respond to questions by the teacher and how their discussion goes.  There are some confusing rights in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights that based on wording may need to be explained or have examples given such as Articles 6, 9, 14, 20, 27. This lesson really encouraged students to think about their own views and perspectives of the world and how they communicate those ideas.