Author:
Melody Casey
Subject:
English Language Arts, Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Level:
Middle School
Grade:
7
Tags:
GEDB, Global Education
License:
Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial
Language:
English

Education Standards

GEDB Human Rights: Human Rights Articles (Lesson 5 of 8)

GEDB Human Rights: Human Rights Articles (Lesson 5 of 8)

Overview

In this lesson, students will choose an article about a global human rights issue to read, learn more about and then reflect on. The lesson will allow students to take to heart the NCDPI Global Education goals of investigating the world, recognizing the perspectives of others in different parts of the world and communicating ideas through their reflection. Note: This lesson was created in accordance with the 7th Grade Social Studies Essential Standards and the VIF/Participate Global Competence Indicators for Grade 7. For more information about VIF/Participate and these indicators, please visit https://www.participate.com/. This lesson was developed by Lindsey Gallagher as part of their completion of the North Carolina Global Educator Digital Badge program. This lesson plan has been vetted at the local and state level for standards alignment, Global Education focus, and content accuracy.            

Lesson Plan

Description

In this lesson, students will choose an article about a global human rights issue to read, learn more about and then reflect on. The lesson will allow students to take to heart the NCDPI Global Education goals of investigating the world, recognizing the perspectives of others in different parts of the world and communicating ideas through their reflection. Note: This lesson was created in accordance with the 7th Grade Social Studies Essential Standards and the VIF/Participate Global Competence Indicators for Grade 7. For more information about VIF/Participate and these indicators, please visit https://www.participate.com/.


Content

Student Engagement/Motivation

Students have learned about the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the history of human rights and North Korea.  Students will now choose an article that touches on an issue of interest to them to read and learn more about it before reflecting. The lesson has some intrinsic motivation as students are allowed to investigate an issue and human right of their own choice.


Learning Targets and Criteria for Success

Learning Targets:

  1. I can read an article about a global human rights issue and summarize what I read.
  2. I can read an article about a global human rights issue and reflect on it in order to share my thoughts and opinions.
  3. I can identify 3 or 4 new and important vocabulary words in an article I read on human rights.

Criteria for Success:

  1. I will read an article about a global human rights issue of personal interest.
  2. I will reflect on or summarize what I have learned about a specific global human rights issue.
  3. I will identifyat least 3 or 4 new and important vocabulary words in the article I read.

Supplies/Resources

  1. Various articles from news websites regarding human rights issues (can be printed or shared electronically if possible)  
  2. Possible articles from Jr. Scholastic: The High Cost of Fashion, In the Line of Fire, North Korea vs. the World, Hungry for Relief in Venezuela, Crisis in Syria
  3. DogoNews (Possible articles: Events that Led to US Airstrikes in Syria, Celebrate Women's History Month with These Inspiring Women, Will Cape Town Be the First City to Run Out of Water?, Parkland Students Organize "March for Our Lives" to Plead for Gun Law Reform)
  4. Newsela (Possible articles: War and Peace articles)
  5. CommonLit (Possible articles: Malala Yousafzai's Speech to the United Nations, Censorship: For the People or For Controlling the People?, Why I Refuse to Say I "Fight" My Disability)
  6. Student Learning/Reflection Log
  7. Unit vocabulary sheet

Learning Tasks and Practice

Activity One

  1. The teacher will follow up on the previous day’s lesson after looking at student learning/reflection logs to see if there were any questions or thoughts that stood out related to North Korea or the TED Talk videos.

 

Activity Two

  1. The teacher will inform students that they will be diving into and learning more about a global human rights issue of interest to them.
  2. The teacher will share with students the variety of articles they could choose from and what issues/human rights they potentially deal with.
  3. The teacher will provide students printed copies of the articles or share electronically.  Examples from these sites include ones on Malala Yousafzai, child labor, gender discrimination in sports, North Korea, young people living in Syria, etc. The teacher may also use sources such as DogoNews, NewsELA, CommonLit and other sites to find articles for students.
  4. The teacher will discuss directions with students. Students will read through the article independently and as they read, highlight, underline or circle new and important vocabulary. (Many of the suggested sources identify the meaning of key vocabulary.)
  5. After reading the article, students will choose to respond in one of three ways in a paragraph of at least five sentences in their learning/reflection logs:
    1. Summarize what was read in the article.  Remember to include who, what, when, where, why and how if applicable.
    2. Discuss the specific human rights the student feels the article connects to and any connections they can make to what was read - experiences, current events, topics from other classes, music, movies, tv, etc.
    3. Reflect on what the article made students think and feel about that particular issue.  Students share their opinion on why they think it is important.
    4. (Required) Identify any new vocabulary students come across in the article they read and write those below.  Add these words and add their definitions to student unit vocabulary sheets.
  6. Students will have time to read through articles and then respond to one of the options above including letter D.  Aide as needed with new and difficult words.

 

Activity Three

  1. If time allows at the end of class, students will share with their group what they think was the most important or most interesting thing they learned.

Technological Engagement

Computer with articles if possible, response prompt on computer if possible


Collecting and Documenting Evidence of Learning

Formative Assessments:

  1. Reflection and response to a human rights article of their choosing

Summative Assessments:

  1. Reflection and response with learning/reflection log
  2. Student additions to vocabulary sheet based on new words/vocab from their chosen article

Student Self-Reflection and Action Steps

Student reflection will occur through their response in their learning/reflection log to one of the three prompts given after they read their chosen article as well as possible discussion in groups.


Feedback/Instructional Adjustments

Use a graphic organizer for students if needed in order to show how to summarize with simple sentence frames.  Example:

The title of the article I read was ________________________.

___________________ was the author of this article.

This article was about ______________________ (issue/person) in ___________________ (place).

(2-3 facts to support what the article is about - who, what, when, where, why, how)

_____________________________________________________________.

_____________________________________________________________.

This issue is important because _________________________________________.


Extended Learning Opportunities

Students will research a human rights issue of interest and write their own article about that topic. Teachers may also work with ELA teachers to review good reading strategies, annotation, etc. ELA, media and technology teachers may also be helpful in providing good sources for possible articles students can read. Check with science, math and related arts teachers for ideas as well.


Teacher Reflection of Learning

This lesson was a little more quiet as it allowed student investigation on their own, they could reflect on their own thoughts and opinions and what their perspective was on those issues.