Author:
Melody Casey
Subject:
English Language Arts, Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Level:
Middle School
Grade:
7
Tags:
GEDB, Global Education
License:
Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial
Language:
English

Education Standards

GEDB Human Rights: Artists Have Rights Too (Lesson 7 of 8)

GEDB Human Rights: Artists Have Rights Too (Lesson 7 of 8)

Overview

In this lesson, students will use their creativity to create a visual representation of a human right that is important to them. The lesson meets NCDPI global education goals such as recognizing perspectives, communicating ideas and taking action (through creation of their poster). Note: This lesson was created in accordance with the 7th Grade Social Studies Essential Standards and the VIF/Participate Global Competence Indicators for Grade 7. For more information about VIF/Participate and these indicators, please visit https://www.participate.com/. This lesson was developed by Lindsey Gallagher as part of their completion of the North Carolina Global Educator Digital Badge program. This lesson plan has been vetted at the local and state level for standards alignment, Global Education focus, and content accuracy.            

Lesson Plan

Description

In this lesson, students will use their creativity to create a visual representation of a human right that is important to them. The lesson meets NCDPI global education goals such as recognizing perspectives, communicating ideas and taking action (through creation of their poster). Note: This lesson was created in accordance with the 7th Grade Social Studies Essential Standards and the VIF/Participate Global Competence Indicators for Grade 7. For more information about VIF/Participate and these indicators, please visit https://www.participate.com/.


Content

Student Engagement/Motivation

This lesson allows students to take what has been learned about and done with human rights and use their creativity to visualize a human rights issue that matters to them and share with others as these will be posted around the school. This lesson is highly motivational for visual students as they can investigate a human right further, create a visual that shows their perspective or that of others and communicates that to others.


Learning Targets and Criteria for Success

Learning Targets:

  1. I can demonstrate understanding of a specific human right of interest to me through an artistic creation.
  2. I can choose a human right that is important to me and create a visual representation of that human right.

 

Criteria for Success:

  1. I will understand the meaning and purpose for at least 3 of the human rights listed in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.
  2. I will create a visual representation of a human right that matters to me and be able to explain why it matters to me.

Supplies/Resources

  1. Universal Declaration of Human Rights (abridged version - project on board or can download a version to give to students)
  2. Preview of examples of artistic representations of human rights
  3. Blank paper
  4. Colored pencils, markers, crayons, pencils, rulers, etc. for drawing, designing and creating

Learning Tasks and Practice

Activity One

  1. The teacher will ask students to reflect on what they’ve learned about human rights so far.   Let students share with a partner or their group one thing they’ve learned about human rights that they think is important and how they think they could educate others about human rights.
  2. The teacher will review with students the definition of a Human Right.

 

Activity Two

  1. Students will have an opportunity to express themselves creatively by making a visual representation of a human right.  This could be through a painting, drawing, poem, video essay or other form approved by the teacher.
  2. Preview some examples of artistic representations of human rights.

 

Activity Three

  1. Students will choose a specific right from the Universal Declaration of Human Rights that is important to them and create a visual representation of that right.  
  2. Students will write the number of that right and the wording for that right somewhere on their paper.  Students will create the visual representation however they would like.  This could be as a drawing, painting, sculpture, song, poem, video essay, etc.
  3. Teachers will decide if they want to have specific expectations for these visuals as project requirements or not.

Technological Engagement

Previewing examples of artistic representations of human rights


Collecting and Documenting Evidence of Learning

 Formative Assessments:

  1. Creation of visual showing understanding of what that right means and how it is impacted around the world

Summative Assessments:

  1. Visual representation of a human right

Student Self-Reflection and Action Steps

Student reflection will be a part of the creation of their visual representation as they are choosing a specific right that is important to them.  These could be shared with the class as they finish.


Extended Learning Opportunities

The teacher will turn the lesson into a bigger project as students create a poster representing a right that is important to them.  It could still be their own visual representation but with some further expectations when it comes to grading. Teachers can also work with both ELA and art teachers to discuss other ways students could create a visual representation of a human right and discuss the deeper meanings of words used in the specific articles that students choose. ELA teachers may also let students create a written response as to why they chose a specific right to focus on and explain their visual representation. Media and technology specialists could also be involved if students decide to create video presentations.


Teacher Reflection of Learning

I really like this lesson as it allows teachers and students to think for themselves, give students choices and an opportunity to be creative.  It is always interesting to see and hear the student throught process as they create and their designs in the end.