Author:
Melody Casey
Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Level:
Upper Primary
Grade:
5
Tags:
GEDB, Global Education
License:
Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial
Language:
English

Education Standards

GEDB 5th Grade Poverty Unit: What Can We Do? (Lesson 5 of 6)

GEDB 5th Grade Poverty Unit: What Can We Do? (Lesson 5 of 6)

Overview

In this lesson, students will listen to a read aloud book in order to understand that children and adults can help people living in poverty. Students will be given opportunities to research ways in which they can help within the community and beyond to make a difference in the world of poverty. They will be provided with time to share and reflect on what they have learned throughout the poverty unit. The teacher will assess student achievement by having students fill in the last portion of the Know, Want to Know, and Learned chart. This lesson was developed by Jena Hazelwood as part of their completion of the North Carolina Global Educator Digital Badge program. This lesson plan has been vetted at the local and state level for standards alignment, Global Education focus, and content accuracy.            

Lesson Plan

Description

In this lesson, students will listen to a read aloud book in order to understand that children and adults can help people living in poverty. Students will be given opportunities to research ways in which they can help within the community and beyond to make a difference in the world of poverty. They will be provided with time to share and reflect on what they have learned throughout the poverty unit. The teacher will assess student achievement by having students fill in the last portion of the Know, Want to Know, and Learned chart.


Content

Student Engagement/Motivation

Student Engagement/Motivation (10 minutes):

The teacher will read aloud the book Uncle Willie and the Soup Kitchen by DyAnn DiSalvo-Ryan. After the read aloud, the teacher and students will discuss how the young boy forms a different opinion about homelessness after volunteering at a soup kitchen.


Learning Targets and Criteria for Success

I can name ways in which a community can help those living in poverty.

I can reflect on what I have learned about poverty.

 

I will research different ways in which community members can help those living in poverty.

I will write a paragraph on what I have learned about poverty.


Supplies/Resources

Print Resource:

Uncle Willie and the Soup Kitchen by DyAnn DiSalvo-Ryan

 

Website Resources:

Inspire My Kids Article: http://www.inspiremykids.com/2016/imk-in-action-how-kids-can-help-reduce-poverty/

 

What Kids Can Do Article:https://www.kidscanmakeadifference.org/what-kids-can-do-2

 

Supplies:

  • Laptops (if laptops are not available, the teacher can print off the information on the websites to pass out to each group)
  • White computer paper
  • Pencils
  • Know, Want to Know, and Learned Chart (see attachments)
  • Know, Want to Know, and Learned Rubric Handout (see attachments)
  • Chart paper

Learning Tasks and Practice

  • Guided Practice and Reflection: (30 minutes)

Students will be placed into groups to rotate through two stations to learn different ways in which they can help people living in poverty. The teacher will determine the number of students for each group depending on class size. They will rotate every 10 minutes until they have been to both stations. Students will be with the same group through both rotations. If laptops are not available, the teacher can print off the information on the websites to pass out to each group. While the students are conducting research, the teacher will be observing and guiding groups that need further instruction.

      • Station 1 (10 minutes): At this station there will be four computers where students will have to use the website Inspire My Kids (http://www.inspiremykids.com/2016/imk-in-action-how-kids-can-help-reduce-poverty/) to research several ways in which they can help people living in poverty. To reflect, each group will use one piece of paper that will already be at each station. To ensure that all group members are participating and reflecting, they will take turns writing by passing the paper to each group member after discussion. Each group will create a list of ways in which they can help those living in poverty.
      • Station 2 (10 minutes): At this station there will be four computers that will have to use the website Kids Can Make a Difference (https://www.kidscanmakeadifference.org/what-kids-can-do-2) to research several ways in which they can help people living in poverty. To reflect, each group will use one piece of paper that will already be at each station. To ensure that all group members are participating and reflecting, they will take turns writing by passing the paper to each group member after discussiion. Each group will create a list of ways in which they can help those living in poverty.   

 

  • Sharing: (10 minutes)

Students will come together as a whole class and share their findings with the group. Each group will pick a spokesperson to speak, but all group members will come to the front together. The teacher will create a whole class list of ways in which children can help people living in poverty. Teacher and students will discuss why it is important to help people, especially those living in poverty. The teacher will point out that even children can do simple things to help or raise money.
 

  • Independent Practice and Closure: (20 minutes)

The teacher will review with students the Know, Want to Know, and Learned sectional chart rubric attachment. Individually, students will write a paragrah (5 sentences) about what they learned on their Know, Want to Know, and Learned chart in their journals (they started this in lesson 1 of this unit). After 5 minutes, students will participate in a sharing activity. Students will be placed into groups depending on how many students the teacher wants in each group. Each student will share what they learned about poverty to their group members. After everyone has shared within their groups, the teacher will ask each group to select a captain to share two things that their group learned about poverty. Students will take turns coming to the interactive whiteboard to record their answers. If the teacher does not have access to an interactive whiteboard the students can use chart paper. The teacher will wrap up the unit by having the whole class make a list of inspirational words that come to mind when they think of poverty (ex. determination, perseverance, helping, caring, motivational). They will create a list on the interactive whiteboard, standard whiteboard, or chart paper and compare these words to the words that they chose at the beginning of the unit (lesson 2).


Technological Engagement

Students will use laptop devices  to conduct research by using two websites. The students will add what they learned about poverty to the know, want to know, and learned sectional chart on the interactive whiteboard, standard whiteboard or chart paper. The teacher will use the document camera to enhance the viewing of a read aloud. If there is not a document camera, then the teacher will read the book aloud in front of the class.


Collecting and Documenting Evidence of Learning

The teacher will also use observations during the read aloud book to see which students understand the meaning of the story.The teacher will use observations while the students are in groups researching ways in which they can help people living in poverty. The teacher will use groups' lists of ways in which children can help people living in poverty to assess if students can connect to real world problems.

The teacher will read the learned section of the Know, Want to Know, and Learned chart.


Student Self-Reflection and Action Steps

Students are given opportunities to share their thoughts to a partner as well as the whole group. If students have not met instructional goals they will be paired with students who have met the instructional goals and can help them further their understandings. Students that have met the instructional goals can help coach students who need further support. The teacher can monitor throughout the lesson to support students who need additional instruction.


Feedback/Instructional Adjustments

Throughout the lesson students are given opportunities to work together and reflect on their understanding of poverty. Students are given time to share their thoughts and are given feedback from their peers and teacher. There is paired discussion throughout the lesson as well as whole group discussion that will enable the teacher ample opportunities to provide feedback. The teacher can adjust the lesson by spending more time on certain topics if the students are not showing adequate knowledge. There can be further conversations about poverty if the teacher feels that it is necessary before moving on to another activity.


Extended Learning Opportunities

Students can create a service learning project that will help those living in poverty.


Teacher Reflection of Learning

The teacher will review individual Know, Want to Know, and Learned chart to assess if students truly understood poverty and if further action needs to be taken. The teacher will use a rubric to score each chart to show which students may need additional support in this area.