Author:
Melody Casey
Subject:
Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Level:
Upper Primary
Grade:
4
Tags:
GEDB, Global Education
License:
Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial
Language:
English

Education Standards

GEDB As the Earth Turns: Day and Night Part 2 (Lesson 2 of 3)

GEDB As the Earth Turns: Day and Night Part 2 (Lesson 2 of 3)

Overview

In this lesson, students will review what they know about how day and night happen through a demonstration by the teacher. Students will act out the process of day and night while the Earth is tilted and rotating on its axis by having the sun shine on one side of the earth. This lesson was developed by Lisa Hiatt as part of their completion of the North Carolina Global Educator Digital Badge program. This lesson plan has been vetted at the local and state level for standards alignment, Global Education focus, and content accuracy.            

Lesson Plan

Description

In this lesson, students will review what they know about how day and night happen through a demonstration by the teacher. Students will act out the process of day and night while the Earth is tilted and rotating on its axis by having the sun shine on one side of the earth.


Content

Student Engagement/Motivation

Students will begin the lesson by reviewing the Know, Want to Know, and Learned (KWL) chart previously created by answering the following questions: What do you know about the causes of day and night on Earth?  What do you want to know about the causes of day and night on Earth? Students will read the responses from the previous lesson and make any necessary adjustments/additions to their chart.


Learning Targets and Criteria for Success

Learning Targets:

  • I can identify and write what I know and questions I have about the causes of day and night on Earth.
  • I can identify the difference between day and night.
  • I can explain the cause of day and night. 
  • I can demonstrate the roles of the sun, earth, and moon. 

 

Criteria for Success Statements:

  • I will write what I know and questions I have about the causes of day and night on Earth in my science notebook. 
  • I will verbally explain the roles of the sun, earth, and moon and the causes of day and night 
  • I will demonstrate the roles of the sun, earth, and moon and the causes of day and night by acting them out. 
  • I will write the roles of the sun, earth, and moon and the causes of day and night.  

Supplies/Resources

Science Notebooks (1 per student)

Class Know, Want to Know, and Learned (KWL)  chart (poster or display on whiteboard) and post-its.

Materials for teacher demonstration:

desk lamp (without the lampshade), globe, white ping-pong ball

Materials for student demonstration:

Sun, Earth, Moon name tags (see attached).  These should be no smaller than a sheet of 81/2" x 11" copy paper.  Students may either hold them or the teacher can punch wholes and tie a string around it so it can be worn around the neck of the student.

Flashlights (one for each group of 3 students).


Learning Tasks and Practice

The teacher will begin the lesson by encouraging students to reflect on what they know about day and night on Earth.  Students will review the previously created Know, Want to Know, and Learned (KWL) chart in their science notebooks, where they indicated what their prior knowledge and questions they have regarding day and night on Earth.  The teacher will encourage students to include any additional thoughts and/or questions to their chart.

The teacher will engage students with a demonstration of the relationship of the earth, moon, and sun.  The teacher should dim the classroom lights and close any window blinds during the demonstrations in order for students to observe the light from the desklamp (sun) more accurately. The teacher will use a desklamp to represent the sun and place it 5-10 feet from a globe.  (The teacher may place the globe and lamp on desks or tables to ensure all students can see the demonstration). The teacher will indicate the class' current location on the globe and face it towards the sun.  (The teacher should consider the current time of the lesson. For example, if the lesson is being taught at noon, the location of the class on the globe should be in direct alignment with the sun, indicating it is the middle of the day.)  The teacher will move the globe, indicating the rotation of the earth on its axis, pointing out to students how the light from the lamp appears on the earth.  The teacher will use a white ping-pong ball to represent the moon and begin revolving the moon around the globe.  The teacher may involve students to help with the movement of the globe or moon if needed.    While demonstrating, the teacher should ask the students questions regarding what is happening to the earth, moon, and sun.

The teacher will group students into groups of 3.  Each group member will be assigned a role and given a paper with the words sun, earth, or moon written on them.  The students acting as the sun will be given a flash light.  The paper should be either held by the student or placed around their neck with a string tied and hole-punched to the paper. The students will act out the process of day and night while the earth is tilted and rotating on its axis by having the sun shine (turn on the flashlight) onto one side of the earth.  The earth will then rotate on its axis for students to see that different parts of the earth face the sun at different times.  Once students have shown mastery of this concept, the student playing the moon will join in.  This student should revolve around the Earth.  The teacher will review with the students that the moon revolves around the earth once about every 28 days based on prior knowledge of the moon phases.

Students will write the roles of the sun, earth, and moon and the causes of day and night in the Learn section of their Know, Want to Know, and Learned (KWL) chart.


Technological Engagement

Day to Night Video. https://www.dkfindout.com/us/video/space/day-to-night/

The Day to Night video should be presented by the teacher during the lesson one.  If needed for reteaching or enrichment, the teacher may choose to present the video again in either a whole or small group setting.


Collecting and Documenting Evidence of Learning

The teacher will use a class checklist (see attached) and anecdotal notes to record observations and evidence of student learning.  The teacher will record evidence found in the student's science notebooks, on post-its displayed on the class chart, student verbal explanations, and student demonstrations.


Student Self-Reflection and Action Steps

Students will be given the opportunity to reflect on their learning in relation to the set learning targets when they document their thinking in their science notebooks, post-its on the class display chart, verbal explanations, and their demonstrations.

When students have not met the instructional goals, the teacher will make a note and intervene by reteaching the necessary concept. Any interventions will be noted on the teacher's checklist.

When students have met the instructional goals, the teacher will make a note indicating the student has met the instructional goal.


Extended Learning Opportunities

To extend the learning opportunities, students may design their own way to represent the relationship between the Earth, moon, and sun.  They may work in small groups or as indivduals.


Teacher Reflection of Learning

After reflecting on what my students indicated in their Know, Want to Know, and Learned (KWL) charts in class as well as their personal science notebooks, I was able to see that my students were ready to apply their knowledge with some movement activities.  I feel that completing a demonstration in class, gave my students another example of how the concept of the relationship between the Earth, sun, and moon works.  In addition, having my students act out the Earth, moon, and sun in a physical movement activity, provided them with an opportunity to solidify their understanding of the concept or clear up any misconceptions they had.