Author:
Melody Casey
Subject:
English Language Arts, Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Level:
Upper Primary
Grade:
4
Tags:
GEDB, Global Education
License:
Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial
Language:
English

Education Standards

GEDB As the Earth Turns: Compare and Contrast (Lesson 3 of 3)

GEDB As the Earth Turns: Compare and Contrast (Lesson 3 of 3)

Overview

In this lesson, students will compare and contrast day and night of their place on earth, to another location. Students will conduct a short research project that builds knowledge through investigation of different aspects of day and night in other locations on earth with a focus on Norway, Sweden, Finland, and Alaska. This lesson was developed by Lisa Hiatt as part of their completion of the North Carolina Global Educator Digital Badge program. This lesson plan has been vetted at the local and state level for standards alignment, Global Education focus, and content accuracy.            

Lesson Plan

Description

In this lesson, students will compare and contrast day and night of their place on earth, to another location. Students will conduct a short research project that builds knowledge through investigation of different aspects of day and night in other locations on earth with a focus on Norway, Sweden, Finland, and Alaska.


Content

Student Engagement/Motivation

Students will begin the lesson by reviewing the Know, Want to Know, and Learned (KWL) chart previously created by answering the following questions: What do you know about the causes of day and night on Earth?  What do you want to know about the causes of day and night on Earth? How do the causes of day and night differ (or compare to) other places around the Earth from where we are?  Students will read the responses from the previous lesson and make any necessary adjustments/additions to their chart.


Learning Targets and Criteria for Success

Learning Targets:

  • I can conduct a short research project regarding night and day to compare and contrast my location at a certain time on earth to another location.  
  • I can write an informative/explanatory text to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly. 
  • I can recognize the perspective of others living in different parts of the world and compare them to day and night where I live. 

 

Criteria for Success Statements:

  • I will write the roles of the sun, earth, and moon and the causes of day and night.  
  • I will conduct a short research project regarding night and day to compare and contrast my location at a certain time on earth to another location. 
  • I will recognize the perspective of others living in different parts of the world and compare them to day and night where I live.  
  • I will write an informative/explanatory text to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly. 

Supplies/Resources

Student computers with web browsing capabilities.

Science notebooks

Notebook paper

Globe

If no online tools available, the teacher and students may use the following books with research:

While You Are Sleeping by Durga Bernhard

Time Zones by David A. Adler Illustrated by Edward Miller


Learning Tasks and Practice

The teacher will model for the students what is required for the research project by indicating the current location and another location on the globe.  The teacher will indicate this information in his/her science notebook or on a whiteboard to model for students.  The teacher will use online tools to research the local time of the location of their choosing.  If no online tools available, the teacher will use a globe and literary materials to support research.  Based on the information the teacher has collected, the teacher will indicate if the location is experiencing day or night.  (The teacher may want to explain times such as dusk or dawn and their meanings.)  Reflecting on the information collected, the teacher will model what types of activities may be taking place due to the amount of sunlight at the given time.

Example:

City/Country:

Local Time:

Notes: (What might be happening in this location during this time?)

Elon, North Carolina, USA

2:00 pm

We are experiencing day time and the sun is shining outside.

Children are in school. We are currently studying science and the moon.

Rome, Italy

8:00 pm

People in Rome are experiencing early evening/night time and the sun has set which means it is dark outside.

Children have eaten dinner and are probably getting ready for bed.

The teacher will encourage students to select a location on the globe and begin completing their student made chart in their science notebooks to begin their investigation. Students will investigate the local times of additional cities and explain how the earth's rotation may be in a different position based on the local time.

In addition, students will conduct research on cities located in the arctic regions that experience prolonged light or dark during certain seasons depending on the tilt on the earths axis.  (Norway, Sweden, Finland, Alaska). For example, the teacher will display the Visit Norway Website on the display board. The teacher will read the article, The Midnight Sun. When finished reading, the teacher will direct students to their map or the class map/globe to locate Norway.  The teacher will demonstrate that when the earth is tilted on its axis, the sunlight is able to shine in certain locations for 24 hours a day.  The teacher will direct a discussion to see what the students think about how things may be different if they lived in prolonged light or darkness.  Students will indicate their thoughts in their chart.

The teacher will explain that once the chart is completed, students will compose an informational writing piece to explain their information.  Students will present their research to the class.

The teacher will use a class checklist (see attached), anecdotal notes to record observations and evidence of student learning, and a writing rubric (see attached) to measure student success.  The teacher will record evidence found in the student science notebooks and in their completed informational piece.

 

If no online tools available, the teacher and students may use the following books with research:

While You Are Sleeping by Durga Bernhard

Time Zones by David A. Adler Illustrated by Edward Miller


Technological Engagement

Visit Norway Website- https://www.visitnorway.com/things-to-do/nature-attractions/midnight-sun/

-This website is to be used by the teacher to present information about Norway.  If needed and technology is accessible, the teacher may direct students to this website individually or in small groups to research Norway additionally.


Collecting and Documenting Evidence of Learning

The teacher will use a class checklist (see attached), anecdotal notes to record observations and evidence of student learning, and a writing rubric (see attached) to measure student success.  The teacher will record evidence found in the student science notebooks and in their completed informational writing piece.


Student Self-Reflection and Action Steps

Students will be given the opportunity to reflect on their learning in relation to the set learning targets when they document their thinking in their informational writing piece.

When students have not met the instructional goals, the teacher will make a note and intervene by reteaching the necessary concept. Any interventions will be noted on the teacher's checklist.

When students have met the instructional goals, the teacher will make a note indicating the student has met the instructional goal.


Extended Learning Opportunities

To extend the learning opportunities, the teacher may connect with another school in Norway, Findland, Sweden, and/or Alaska.  Through this connection, students could learn through their peers in these regions about how prolonged dark and light affects their daily tasks.  Students could learn of specific experiences their peers have had to better understand their perspective.


Teacher Reflection of Learning

This lesson provided my students with the opportunity to apply their knowledge of day and night in their location and compare it to other places around the world.  By exposing my students to locations above the Arctic circle, they were able to see that other locations do not always experience day and night like they do in their location.  We talked about how having prolonged light or darkness could affect their sleeping patners.  We also found that some of these locations partake in festivals or nighttime activities based on the light.