Author:
Melody Casey
Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Level:
Upper Primary
Grade:
3
Tags:
  • GEDB
  • Global Education
    License:
    Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial
    Language:
    English

    Education Standards

    GEDB Global Issues are Local Issues: Education (Lesson 2of 3)

    GEDB Global Issues are Local Issues: Education (Lesson 2of 3)

    Overview

    Students will research education around the globe. Students will collaborate to identify global and local educational issues. Students will conduct a service project to address a local education issue. This lesson was developed by Julie Johnson as part of their completion of the North Carolina Global Educator Digital Badge program. This lesson plan has been vetted at the local and state level for standards alignment, Global Education focus, and content accuracy.            

    Lesson Plan

    Description

    Students will research education around the globe. Students will collaborate to identify global and local educational issues. Students will conduct a service project to address a local education issue.


    Content

    Student Engagement/Motivation

    Students will watch Living on One Dollar, Episode 7  (Not Going to School)

    http://viewpure.com/ayTRujPD-14?end=0&start=0

    After the video, students will answer the following questions:

    • What were some differences between this school in Guatemala and our school?
    • Are these differences are good or bad? Why?
    • How is education in other parts of the world simililar to your education?

    Learning Targets and Criteria for Success

    *Students can compare schools in other countries to their own school.

    *Students will collaboratively research and document global educational problems in a classroom Google Doc.

    *Students can identify local educational problems within their own community.

    *Students will plan and execute a service project to address the identified educational problem.


    Supplies/Resources

    Computers
    Google Doc (The teacher must have a Google account.  The teacher must set the document's share right to share with anyone that has a link.  By doing so, students do not need accounts).

    Websites:

    Living On One Dollar Episode 7(Not going to School)
    http://viewpure.com/ayTRujPD-14?end=0&start=0

    Research Websites (Make links available to your students)

    Fact Monster: Schools Around the World
    http://www.factmonster.com/world/statistics/school-years.html

    World New: Schools Around the World-In Pictures
    http://www.theguardian.com/world/gallery/2015/oct/02/schools-around-the-world-un-world-teachers-day-in-pictures

    Washington Post: How classrooms look around the world-in 15 amazing photographs
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/answer-sheet/wp/2015/11/13/how-classrooms-look-around-the-world-in-15-amazing-photographs/?utm_term=.21aee1e86051


    Learning Tasks and Practice

    Before the lesson, the teacher should create a Google Doc entitled "Global Education Issues." On this document, make a chart with two columns labeled "Problem" and "Why it is a problem." Share the Google Doc link with your students.

    The teacher will tell students that they are going to work in pairs for 30 minutes to research education in two countries other than the United States.  During their research, students should identify problems they find with their countries' educational systems.  Once they identify an educational problem, they should discuss the problem with their partner and develop an explanation of why they believe it is a problem. Students should record the problem and explanation on a piece of paper.  Each pair will be responsible for identifying a minimum of two problems.  This should take approximately thirty minutes.

    To get them started and to help cover the spectrum of countries, the teacher should assign each pair two countries from Fact Monster, School Years around the World website.  The countries addressed on this website include Australia, Brazil, China, Costa Rica, France, Iran, Japan, Kenya, Mexico, Nigeria, North Korea, Russia, and South Korea.

    Fact Monster: Schools Around the World

    http://www.factmonster.com/world/statistics/school-years.html

    Below are two additional links students may use if they have additional time:

    World New: Schools Around the World-In Pictures
    http://www.theguardian.com/world/gallery/2015/oct/02/schools-around-the-world-un-world-teachers-day-in-pictures

    Washington Post: How classrooms look around the world-in 15 amazing photographs
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/answer-sheet/wp/2015/11/13/how-classrooms-look-around-the-world-in-15-amazing-photographs/?utm_term=.21aee1e86051

    After thirty minutes, the teacher will show students where to access the link to the Google Doc.  Student will type their written information into the chart on the Google Doc.

    *Remind students not to type in a table cell that is highlighted because someone else is currently typing in that cell.  Also tell students not to type in a row that already contains text.  Tell them that when everyone is done you will combine similar findings.

    After students have documented their findings, the class will come together and use the Google Doc to discuss educational problems around the globe.  At this time, the teacher can modify the information in the Google Doc to combine similiar problems and make adjustments based on classroom discussion.

    After the class finishes the "Global Education Issues" Google Doc, the teacher should lead students in a discussion of local education issues. What are some global education issues that are also local education issues?  What specific issues does our school or other schools in our community face? Once local issues are identified, allow students to decide on a local education service project that addresses one of the issues they identified. The service project can be for the class, school or local school community.  The teacher should help facilitate the planning and implementation of the service project.

    (Example:  As a Title I school our students identified that not having books at home is a local educational issue.  We did a schoolwide book swap, providing all students with books to take home. Students participated by preparing for and helping during the event.)

    Students will complete this lesson with an exit slip.  For their exit slip, students should write three things that they believe all schools should have or should do worldwide.


    Technological Engagement

    Google Doc collaboration

    Internet Research


    Collecting and Documenting Evidence of Learning

    Students will be evaluated with an exit slip that demonstrates what they have learned about global education.


    Student Self-Reflection and Action Steps

    Students will monitor their own learning by working with their partner to agree on two educational problems and an explanation of why they are problems. Students will also monitor their own learning by making comparisons between global and local educational problems.


    Extended Learning Opportunities

    Schools Around the World research websites are available to your students.  They can revisit the links and continue to learn about schools in other countries.

    Additionally, teachers could use Skype in the Classroom to partner with a classroom in another country.  Students could interact virtually with global students and learn more about each other's education system.

    http://unctv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/vtl07.la.rv.text.lpcomped/comparing-education-around-the-world/


    Teacher Reflection of Learning

    This lesson is designed to take two 1-hour sessions.  Combining the Google Doc during the class discussion took more time than I anticipated.  The teacher was the one combining simililar ideas on the Google Doc. because students were not at a high level of learning or engagement during the combination process.  For these reasons, I would combine similar findings in between the two sessions.  This way I could resume session two by focusing only on the students' identification of global educational problems.