Author:
Melody Casey
Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Level:
High School
Grade:
11
Tags:
  • GEDB
  • Global Education
  • License:
    Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial
    Language:
    English

    Education Standards

    GEDB Causes of Revolution: Causes of the American Revolution (Lesson 1 of 5)

    GEDB Causes of Revolution: Causes of the American Revolution (Lesson 1 of 5)

    Overview

    The purpose of this lesson is to help students identify and evaluate possible causes of revolution by examining the causes of the American Revolution. In this lesson, students will be analyzing and evaluating the tensions over power and authority between the British government and the British colonists. Students will be investigating the world and recognizing perspectives by evaluating the disagreements between the British colonists and the British government . They will also be communicating ideas by analyzing colonial and British documents and describing the tensions between the British government and British colonists. Students will reading primary source documents, thinking about the authors and content of the documents, discussing these ideas with group members, and evaluating these ideas in a written response. This lesson was developed by Dorothy Kerby as part of their completion of the North Carolina Global Educator Digital Badge program. This lesson plan has been vetted at the local and state level for standards alignment, Global Education focus, and content accuracy.            

    Lesson Plan

    Description

    The purpose of this lesson is to help students identify and evaluate possible causes of revolution by examining the causes of the American Revolution. In this lesson, students will be analyzing and evaluating the tensions over power and authority between the British government and the British colonists (NCES.CE.C&G.1.1). Students will be investigating the world and recognizing perspectives by evaluating the disagreements between the British colonists and the British government . They will also be communicating ideas by analyzing colonial and British documents and describing the tensions between the British government and British colonists. Students will be required to read, write, think, and talk in this lesson. Students will reading primary source documents, thinking about the authors and content of the documents, discussing these ideas with group members, and evaluating these ideas in a written response. This lesson will consist of teacher facilitated notes and discussion opportunities that will prompt group and classroom conversation.


    Content

    Student Engagement/Motivation

    To motivate and engage students, teacher can ask students to discuss (with a partner) and write 2 ways they think the government is important and 2 ways they can contribute to governmental change.  Students will also conduct a Think/Pair/Share as an opening activity which is designed to motivate students to learn about the necessity of government and how conflict can lead to governmental change.  This will give students the opportunity to discuss and write about whether or not they think government is important and how they can contribute to governmental change in the proper way.


    Learning Targets and Criteria for Success

    Learning Targets:

    • I can discuss the necessity of government in a society.
    • I can identify causes of the American Revolution.
    • I can identify tensions and struggles between the British government and British colonists.
    • I can analyze primary source documents.

    Criteria for Success:

    • I will be able to write and discuss, in small and large groups, why government is necessary in society.
    • I will describe and explain tensions and struggles between the British government and the British colonists.
    • I will read and understand primary source documents, or first hand accounts, by breaking each paragraph down individually.
    • After analyzing primary source documents, I will create a written evaluation of the tensions and struggles between the British government and British colonists.

    Supplies/Resources

    Materials Needed

    • Blank paper/pencil/pen
    • Internet Access and Computers
    • *Optional: Provided copies of primary source documents

    Learning Tasks and Practice

    Causes of the American Revolution:

    • In this lesson, students will be investigating the world and recognizing the perspectives of others in an investigation of the tensions and struggles for power between the British government and British/American colonists.  Through the primary source documents, that students will read, they will discover that some colonists and/or British subjects felt that the two groups should reconcile, while others felt that it was time for a break between the British government and the colonists.  Recognizing perspectives from British and colonial subjects will help students evaluate the causes and impacts of revolutions such as the American Revolution.

     

    Activity 1: Discussion (15 minutes)

    1. To begin, teacher will instruct students to participate in a Think/Pair/Share activity. This activity allows students to think about the questions presented, pair with a partner to discuss, and share with the large group. It gives students an opportunity to first think about their responses to questions, then allows them to get feedback from a partner.
    2. Teacher will ask students to get into groups of 2 or will assign these groups depending on teacher preference.
    3. When all questions have been answered with a partner, teacher will instruct the students groups to share/discuss their answers within the large group (entire class).
    4. Teacher will instruct students to think about the questions, discuss with their partner, and write their answers down.  
    5. Once students have a partner, teacher will ask students the following questions (that have been written on the board or typed up in a hard copy).Teacher will write questions (Below) on the board (or type them up and give to each group). Then students will answer the questions and discuss with their partner.
      1. Is government necessary?
      2. Why do different forms of government exist?
      3. How/why does a government change?
      4. How/why does conflict lead to governmental change?

     

    Activity 2: Presentation of Notes: Causes of the American Revolution (45-60 minutes, depending on discussion)

    1. Teacher will instruct students to follow along with slides and copy down important information. Important information will be depicted in red text. This presentation of notes will allow the teacher to present students with content knowledge/background information.
      • Some slides have discussion questions which are designed to foster conversation between students. 

     

    Activity 3: Primary Source Analysis (last 15-30 minutes of class and carry over into day 2)

    1. Teacher will split students into 3 groups.  
    2. Teacher will assign each group one of the primary sources linked below.  
      1.  Edmund Burke’s Speech on Conciliation with America can be found at this link-- http://teachingamericanhistory.org/library/document/speech-on-conciliation-with-america/
      2. The Olive Branch Petition can be found at this link-- http://avalon.law.yale.edu/18th_century/contcong_07-08-75.asp
      3. Thomas Paine’s Common Sense can be found at this link-- http://web.archive.org/web/20080516215808/http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/toc/modeng/public/PaiComm.html  (This link takes you to an index with all chapters present. Teacher can have students read all chapters, which could take a while, or teacher could pick a chapter(s) for students to read). (Teacher can always add other primary sources if more are needed or if teacher doesn't want to use the ones provided.)
    3. Teacher will instruct students in each group to read their assigned document and discuss among their group.
    4. Teacher will instruct students to answer the following question in a written response: "How does this document show tensions or struggles between the British Government and the British colonists?"
    5. Students can also use analytical devices such as APPARTS to analyze their documents. APPARTS requires the student to break down the primary source document by answer guided questions which are provided in APPARTS. APPARTS is an acronym that stands for Author, Place and Time, Prior Knowledge, Audience, Reason, The Main Idea, Signifiance. Each letter has a series of questions that guides the student to discover and analyze the primary source document. The following is an analytical device that can be used to analyze documents. http://chnm.gmu.edu/cyh/archive/files/apparts_b60cd02284.pdf
    6. Teacher should tell students to be ready to discuss, with the whole class, what their document is about and how it demonstrates a struggle over power and authority between the British government and the British colonists.
    7.  (The teacher should guide discussion among students to facilitate learning. Teacher should assist students as needed and guide the large group discussion. Teacher can also remind students of the beginning questions about government in the Think/Pair/Share activity.)(

    Remind students that each document is different and authored by different people.)


    Technological Engagement

    Students will be using a computer to access primary source documents and type a written response to the proposed question.


    Collecting and Documenting Evidence of Learning

    Teacher will collect group analysis and responses and/or APPARTS.  Teacher will also collect each groups written response to the questions, "How does this document show tensions or a struggle between the British Government and the British colonists?".