Author:
Melody Casey
Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Level:
Middle School
Grade:
7
Tags:
  • GEDB
  • Global Education
  • License:
    Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial
    Language:
    English

    Education Standards

    GEDB The Power of Literacy: What Is Illiteracy Really? (Lesson 1 of 4)

    GEDB The Power of Literacy: What Is Illiteracy Really? (Lesson 1 of 4)

    Overview

    Students will determine central ideas on the concept of illiteracy and will cite several pieces of text evidence to support their analysis. This lesson was developed by Kimm Murfitt as part of their completion of the North Carolina Global Educator Digital Badge program. This lesson plan has been vetted at the local and state level for standards alignment, Global Education focus, and content accuracy.            

    Lesson Plan

    Description

    Students will determine central ideas on the concept of illiteracy and will cite several pieces of text evidence to support their analysis.


    Content

    Learning Targets and Criteria for Success

    Students will determine central ideas on the concept of illiteracy and will cite several pieces of text evidence to support their analysis. 


    Learning Tasks and Practice

    Connection:

      1. Ask students to work with the members of their small group. Create a list with the members of your group that lists all the things you can remember reading from the moment you opened your eyes until you walked in this room.
      2. After creating a class list, discuss how drastically life would change if they students no longer had this skill.

    Teaching Point:

    Today we are going to begin exploring the issue of illiteracy. We’ll begin with a personal reflection of our individual perspective and background understanding on this topic by creating a graphic organizer. We will continue exploration by discovering what other perspectives are held in other parts of our world that could contribute to illiteracy rates.

    Lesson Procedures
    Graphic Organizer Activity:

      1. Students will be given the graphic organizer to begin the work of the unit. The graphic organizer is sectioned into four parts. Section one will require students to define illiteracy. Section two will require students to draw/list things they usually picture when they think of illiteracy. Section three will require students to brainstorm concerns/issues an illiterate person would encounter. Section four will require students to brainstorm factors that could contribute to high illiteracy rates.  (Refer to resource 1A)
      2. When students finish this work, they will share their ideas. Students will also return to this graphic organizer at the end of the unit.
      3. Discuss with the students the ideas from the lists and how many things we would struggle with or be limited by if we could not read. Explain functional literacy to the students and its definition according to UNESCO (United Nations Educational Scientific, and Cultural Organization).

    Independent Activity:

      1. Students will be given the link to UNESCO’s infographic for Literacy in the World: http://www.unesco.org/new/fileadmin/MULTIMEDIA/HQ/ED/pdf/ILD2015-Literacyfacts1.pdf. This infographic provides an overview of global progress in literacy rates over fifteen years. They will view the clip from TestTube News: What Are the World’s Most Illiterate Countries?  In order to access the Testtube News Clip, students/teacher will use google and type: Testtube News "What Are the World's Most Illiterate Countries?"
      2. They will analyze this infographic and the TestTube News clip to write a statement about the issue of literacy and will give several pieces of evidence to support this idea. They will share these ideas with the class either in a whole class or small group format.

    Collecting and Documenting Evidence of Learning

    Students will create a "tweet" for the class wall to explain what they found most valuable from today's learning.  (Refer ro resource IB)
     

    **Attached resources were authored by Kimm Murfitt, 2016.