Author:
Melody Casey
Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Level:
Upper Primary
Grade:
5
Tags:
  • GEDB
  • Global Education
    License:
    Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial
    Language:
    English

    GEDB Nonfiction and Haiti: A Picture is Worth a Thousand Words PART II (Lesson 7 of 8)

    GEDB Nonfiction and Haiti: A Picture is Worth a Thousand Words PART II (Lesson 7 of 8)

    Overview

    Students will view photographs of Haiti to investigate the world beyond the classroom and recognize different perspectives while looking at different photographs. It is expected that student’s perspectives will be limited since they have not been exposed to a lot of information on Haiti. *This lesson is the 7th lesson in an 8 lesson unit on non-fiction texts and Haiti. It requires the completion of the entire lesson in order to make sense. This lesson was developed by Kate Quigley as part of their completion of the North Carolina Global Educator Digital Badge program. This lesson plan has been vetted at the local and state level for standards alignment, Global Education focus, and content accuracy.

    Lesson Plan

    Description

    Students will view photographs of Haiti to investigate the world beyond the classroom and recognize different perspectives while looking at different photographs. It is expected that student’s perspectives will be limited since they have not been exposed to a lot of information on Haiti. *This lesson is the 7th lesson in an 8 lesson unit on non-fiction texts and Haiti. It requires the completion of the entire lesson in order to make sense.


    Content

    Learning Targets and Criteria for Success

    I will analyze information in order to increase their knowledge about a topic.

    I will build an understanding about a topic based not only from what a source explicitly says but also from what it implie.

    I will continue to build background knowledge about the hardships that the people of Haiti endured.


    Supplies/Resources

    A photograph from Haiti, one per group mounted on a large sheet of paper (different from the start of the unit), pens or pencils, classroom board


    Learning Tasks and Practice

    Gather a range of interesting photos of Haiti so that you have a different photo for each small group of four to five in your class. Remove the captions  and mount each in the center of a large sheet of paper. Put students in groups and tell them that they will be completing an exercise to help them on their paths of becoming an expert on a topic. Their job will be to write comments in the space around the photo, leaving room for other’s writing as well. Write the following four “response choices” on the board to remind students of the kinds of things they should be writing in response to the photo they receive. Tell them they may do any or all of the following:

    1. Make a personal connection to the photo (e.g.; “Reminds me of when I visited the Empire State Building in the third grade”).
    2. Write a questions the photo brings to mind (e.g., “Why can you see only the backs of people’s heads in this picture?).
    3. Write a detailed observation about the photo (e.g., “The color red is everywhere-the sun, one person’s shoes, and the flowers in the background.).
    4. Make a guess as to what information the original caption of this photo had (e.g., “This looks like the dedication of a memorial to someone”).

    Give the groups each a photo and three to five minutes to write. When each group finishes, have it pass the paper to another group, moving clockwise. When each group of students receives the new photo, they should add their comments to those already there. They can continue the work of adding personal connections, observations or questions or respond to previous writing as if having a conversation with the notes left by previous students.

    Continue this way until all the groups in the room have seen and commented on all the photos.


    Collecting and Documenting Evidence of Learning

    The teacher will observe the students as they move from group to group adding personal connections, observations, or questions. The teacher can compare this set of pictures/writing with the first set of pictures and writing that was completed at the start of this unit. The chart paper with the picture and comments can be used as documentation of learning.


    Student Self-Reflection and Action Steps

    Ask the students to discuss how their relationship to the photos and their understanding of what each “says” deepened as they wrote and responded to what others wrote. Were students able to articulate and explain their own and other’s perspectives thoughtfully and respectfully? Compare and Contrast students' first set of pictures from the start of the unit to this ending set. Was it easier? Harder? Why? Did their perspective change or was it the same? Students will write a reflection on how this persepective activitiy changed for them from the start of the unit until now.