Author:
Melody Casey
Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Level:
Upper Primary
Grade:
4
Tags:
  • GEDB
  • Global Education
  • License:
    Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial
    Language:
    English

    Education Standards

    GEDB Feeding the World: Orange Trading Game (Lesson 10 of 12)

    GEDB Feeding the World: Orange Trading Game (Lesson 10 of 12)

    Overview

    In this lesson, students participate in a simulation activity to learn about fair trade. Note: This lesson was created in accordance with the VIF Global Competence Indicators for Grade 4. For more information about VIF and these indicators, please visit https://www.vifprogram.com/. This lesson was developed by Brenda Todd as part of their completion of the North Carolina Global Educator Digital Badge program. This lesson plan has been vetted at the local and state level for standards alignment, Global Education focus, and content accuracy.

    Lesson Plan

    Description

    In this lesson, students participate in a simulation activity to learn about fair trade. Note: This lesson was created in accordance with the VIF Global Competence Indicators for Grade 4. For more information about VIF and these indicators, please visit https://www.vifprogram.com/.


    Content

    Student Engagement/Motivation

    Before students enter the room, divide them into two groups by the month they were born (e.g.:  Group 1: January-June; Group 2:July-December.) Then, follow these steps:

    • Divide students into the distinct groups without telling them why they are being separated.
    • Direct the groups to sit in two separate areas of the room.
    • Without verbalizing it to the students, choose one of the groups to favor. Without explaining why, give everyone in the favored group a few pieces of candy (or new pencils). Explain to the class that only one group will get the candy. That same group will be the only ones to get other special privileges (such as extra recess time, no homework, being first in line, etc.) Students in the other group likely will protest.
    • After a few minutes or until someone in the other group says, “That’s not fair!”, stop the exercise.
    • Ask students if they know what determined whether they were in the favored group or the non-favored group. Encourage all guesses and share the answer.

    Follow up questions: How did you feel during the exercise? Do you think you would have felt differently if you had been the one getting the candy and special treats/privileges?


    Learning Targets and Criteria for Success

    Learning Targets:

    I can understand how fair trade benefits producers.

    Criteria for Success:

    I will synthesize what contributed to the success or failure of my farming adventure by

    I will create an advertisement about fair trade.


    Supplies/Resources


    Learning Tasks and Practice

    Guiding Questions:

    1. Have you ever worked really hard and not reached your goal?
    2. What is fair trading?
    3. How does fair trade help producers?
    4. What affect does it have on the consumer?

    Have a few pictures to share of activities that are fair and unfair (depends on age of kids) and have them give a thumbs up if it is fair and thumbs down if it is unfair.

    Discussion Questions/Discussion Starters: Describe a person who is fair. What does unfair mean to you?  Let tstudents discuss the meaning of the word “fair.” What happens when a team doesn’t follow the rules of a game or follow the rules of a sport and the other team follows the rules?

    Brainstorm: Have students make a list of words, phrases, drawings, et cetera of what they associated with the term “Fair Trade” and what they think it might mean.

    Tell students they are going to become a family of farmers growing oranges and trading them. They will be producers. (Depending on whether they’ve already had lessons on producers and consumers you may need to remind them about who producer and consumers are).

    Investigate and Analyze

    Show students different Perspectives on FairTrade through the following videos —  Use as time permits.

    Have students complete the activity “The Orange Trading Game.”

    Synthesize and Create

    Students will create an advertisement about fair trade. Advertisements should include why people should produce and consumer fair trade items.

    Locate a map showing fair trade in the world.


    Technological Engagement

    Students will be presented with content via various technological media.


    Collecting and Documenting Evidence of Learning

    Formative assessment

    • Monitoring of student discussions
    • Checklist to track student participation and responses to questions posed throughout the lesson
    • Participation and discussion during the game

    Summative assessment

    • Comments shared during debrief session (Use the Debrief handout from “The Orange Trading Game.”)
    • Advertisements (Rubric – Lesson 10 provided as an attached resource file)

    Student Self-Reflection and Action Steps

    Ask students the questions from the Debrief handout from “The Orange Trading Game.”


    Feedback/Instructional Adjustments

    The gradual release model is suggested for use with this unit. In this model, the teacher demonstrates the work/skill, then the teachers and the students work together, then the students work together, then the students work independently. Because students have many opportunities to practice the skill/concept, the teacher has ample time to assess understanding and address student misconceptions.

    A variety of instructional activities are also used in order to meet the learning needs of diverse students.

    Remediation, if needed, would be through ongoing discussions (both teacher-student and student-student) and extending or repeating during a new lesson as some lessons build on others.


    Extended Learning Opportunities

    Have students complete the interactive simulation “3rd World Farmer”.


    Teacher Reflection of Learning

    Students were given different amounts of money, scissors, templates for tracing oranges, crayons. If they wanted more they had to purchase what they wanted. Students found this unfair at first and then they really started getting it. They want to keep doing it.