Author:
Melody Casey
Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Level:
Middle School
Grade:
7
Tags:
  • GEDB
  • Global Education
  • License:
    Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial
    Language:
    English

    Education Standards

    GEDB The Global Food Crisis: Call to Action (Lesson 5 of 5)

    GEDB The Global Food Crisis: Call to Action (Lesson 5 of 5)

    Overview

    Students will investigate how individuals, groups, and corporations have created change and how they are calling people to action. Students will then decide on how they want to take action themselves to aid in the global food crisis. This lesson was developed by Emily Waddington as part of their completion of the North Carolina Global Educator Digital Badge program. This lesson plan has been vetted at the local and state level for standards alignment, Global Education focus, and content accuracy.

    Lesson Plan

    Description

    Students will investigate how individuals, groups, and corporations have created change and how they are calling people to action. Students will then decide on how they want to take action themselves to aid in the global food crisis.


    Content

    Learning Targets and Criteria for Success

    Learning Targets/Criteria for Success:

    Learning Targets:

    -I can cite several pieces of text evidence to support how individuals (or groups) have created change and have positively impacted the global food crisis.

    -I can explain how interactions between individuals, events and ideas have influenced change for others.

    -I can collaborate with my peers to identify opportunities and ideas to improve the global food crisis.

    Criteria for Success:

    -I will read articles and watch videos to see how individuals (or groups) have created change and positively impacted the global food crisis.

    -I will work collaboratively with a team to create a plan of action to improve the global food crisis.

    -I will act to improve local, regional, and/or global conditions in responsible ways.

    -I will act collaboratively to improve conditions of the global food crisis.


    Supplies/Resources

    Materials:

    -Student access to technology (laptops, ipads, etc.)

    -Chart paper/chart markers

    References:

    "Waste No Food: A Teenager's Bold Idea to End Hunger." TED.com. TED, n.d. Web. 07 May

    2017.<https://www.ted.com/watch/ted-institute/ted-unilever/waste-no-food>.


    Learning Tasks and Practice

    Teacher Preparation:

    -Research local organizations to see what opportunities may be available to students to help with the global food crisis.

    Lesson Procedures:

    Connection

    Connect students with past learning. Say to students: “Over the past few days, we have learned about the global food crisis and researched the contributing factors to the crisis. We’ve even taken on the perspective of low-income families through a mock hunger banquet. Now that we’ve gained this knowledge about this fast-growing global problem, we must ask ourselves what can we do to create change. Through some of your research, you’ve learned of numerous individuals, groups, and corporations calling people to action.  There are many people who are striving to end world hunger.  They have created a tremendous amount of resources for others to help.”

    Teaching Point:

    Say to students: “Today we will look at how some of these individuals, groups, and corporations have created change and how they are calling people to action.  We will then decide how we want to take action ourselves.”

    Guided Practice:

    Watch the Ted Institute video: Waste no food: A teenager’s bold idea to end hunger about a 16-year old boy “who founded the ‘shared economy’ platform ‘Waste No Food’ which connects leftovers from dozens of restaurants and grocery stores in the Bay Area directly with shelters for the hungry and homeless.  His new app closes the distribution gap between donors and recipients by connecting them directly within seconds ("Waste No Food: A Teenager's Bold Idea to End Hunger”).”

    After the video, discuss with students how Kiran Sridhar created change by asking the following questions: “What did Kiran understand about hunger? What did this knowledge result in? How did Kiran impact the global food crisis?”

    Discuss and model for students the answers to the above questions. Explain: “Kiran understood that a most basic human right is access to food.  He understood that there is ‘no greater equalizer than eradicating hunger.’  This knowledge resulted in him using an efficient process through technology.  Companies can use the app he created to donate (within a 20-mile radius) leftover food that people can claim.  Kiran impacted the global food crisis by setting a goal to provide one million meals in a year. He claims that we have the ‘power and obligation’ to help eradicate hunger.”

    Small-Group Work:

    Students will now work in small groups to see how other individuals (or groups) have created change and have positively impacted the global food crisis.  Students can work with the same group as in lesson 4, or students can be formed into new groups for this assignment.  Take into consideration the students and their group work capabilities.

    Students will answer the three questions about the person or groups role in helping fight the crisis of world hunger. Students can answer the three questions using the shared google document template titled “Creating Change” if they have access to computers.  Have students open the google document link given below. To enable editing access, students will click “file” and “make a copy.”  Upon completion of the assignment, students can share the google document to be checked.

    If google documents are not an option, a printed copy of the PDF can be copied and distributed to student groups and filled out by hand.

    Choose from the following:

    -30 Hour Famine: https://www.30hourfamine.org/

    -Aidan Ryan: https://www.csmonitor.com/World/Making-a-difference/Change-Agent/2017/0425/Teen-siblings-raise-nearly-110-000-to-fight-hunger-in-Washington-State

    -Toronto clothing line is helping to feed the hungry: http://globalnews.ca/video/2914803/making-a-difference-new-toronto-clothing-line-is-helping-to-feed-the-hungry

    Now that students have seen a variety of ideas on how others have impacted the global food crisis, they will begin to brainstorm how they can help.  Have students discuss in their small groups first and then share ideas as a class.  Create an anchor chart to list ideas.  Decide as a class which action they would like to take. 

    It may be helpful to provide students with ideas of what is going on locally to help them get started.  For example, Bill’s Backpack Blessings is an ongoing ministry at University Hills Baptist Church in Charlotte, North Carolina that feeds 40 students at a local elementary school.  Each week bags of nonperishable food items are packed and delivered to students who have been identified by the school as having little or nothing to eat on the weekends.  The church members and other locals in the community donate food items and monetary donations to fill the bags.  The students in the class may decide they want to help donate and pack bags for a month.  This is something that will vary depending on the class and their interests.  It is important to let the students decide on what action they want to take.

    Actions may include:

    -Fill a backpack with food (Example: Bill’s Backpack Blessings)

    -Raising Awareness: Making others aware of the global food crisis and somehow sharing this information (students could share research to younger students at an elementary school)

    -Support small farmers: Research ways students/families can support local farmers (Example: buying products with the “Fair Trade” label)

    -Join an organization and/or donate

    Once the students and the class have agreed on an action, share the service learning project rubric that shows students how they will be assessed. Answer any questions students may have about the project. The service learning project rubric was adapted from: http://lessonplanspage.com/sslaomdcommunityunit-serviceprojectrubric36-htm/.

    After answering all questions about the rubric, students can begin filling out the Action Plan Template.

    Closure:

    Encourage students to follow through with their plan.  Help students as necessary.  After action has been completed, have students reflect on the experience by writing/journaling about the success of the plan in their notebooks.  Share and discuss ways they could improve the plan if they were to do it over again.

    Assess students by using the service learning rubric.


    Collecting and Documenting Evidence of Learning

    -3 questions answering how others have created change

    -Student discussions for plans to take action

    -Taking Action Planning Sheet

    -Reflection writing: Did students complete action?  What would they change next time?

    -Service Learning Project Rubric