Author:
Melody Casey
Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Level:
Middle School
Grade:
7
Tags:
  • GEDB
  • Global Education
  • License:
    Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial
    Language:
    English

    Education Standards

    GEDB Ideas Worth Sharing: The Lost Boys of Sudan (Lesson 2 of 5)

    GEDB Ideas Worth Sharing: The Lost Boys of Sudan (Lesson 2 of 5)

    Overview

    Students use narrative techniques to develop personal experiences and events to convey a message. Learners engage in a range of collaborative discussions about global issues that drive stereotypes and misinterpretations, building on others’ ideas, and expressing their own clearly. This lesson was developed by Jaclyn Garing as part of their completion of the North Carolina Global Educator Digital Badge program. This lesson plan has been vetted at the local and state level for standards alignment, Global Education focus, and content accuracy.

    Lesson Plan

    Description

    Students use narrative techniques to develop personal experiences and events to convey a message. Learners engage in a range of collaborative discussions about global issues that drive stereotypes and misinterpretations, building on others’ ideas, and expressing their own clearly.


    Content

    Learning Targets and Criteria for Success

    Students use narrative techniques to develop personal experiences and events to convey a message. Learners engage in a range of collaborative discussions about global issues that drive stereotypes and misinterpretations, building on others’ ideas, and expressing their own clearly. This lesson will focus on how people’s assumptions lead to stereotypes.


    Learning Tasks and Practice

    Building upon the learning from the previous lesson, “The Stories that Shape Us,” post the following quote from Chimamanda Adichie’s speech:

    “The single story creates stereotypes, and the problem with stereotypes is not that they are untrue, but that they are incomplete. They make one story become the only story.”

    Students have the option to write or illustrate a familiar “middle school” stereotype. They will discuss how this quote challenges their thinking?

    Present background information on The Lost Boys of Sudan:

    From 1983 to 2005, over 20,000 boys of the Nuer and Dinka ethnic groups were displaced or orphaned as a result of a war in southern Sudan.  Two Sudanese orphaned refugees, Peter Dut and Santino Chuor, set out to reach a refugee camp in Kenya, along with thousands of other children. Along the way, they survived lion attacks and militia gunfire, in addition to dealing with starvation and lack of sleep.  After reaching the refugee camp, they were chosen to come to America.  Although safe from physical danger and hunger, they are far from home and are forced to deal with a world unknown to them.

    Students view the National Geographic video. While viewing the video, students are asked to look for generalizations and misunderstandings between the Americans and The Lost Boys of Sudan. Tell the students that taking something specific and applying to more broad groups is making a generalization. It is a generalization to say all dogs chase squirrels. Students will consider the perspective of the Lost Boys and jot moments where they generalize Americans.

    Group Discussion: What did you notice? How did culture impact the story of The Lost Boys?

    Independent Work: Cultural Generalization Scenarios Activity (see attached)

    Students review the following scenarios and choose two scenarios to analyze their interpretations. The purpose of the activity is for students to develop self-awareness of their own cultural bias and stereotypes.


    Collecting and Documenting Evidence of Learning

    Stduent responses on discussion board: How do we apply this thinking about stereotypes to the text we read? Is that all there is to know? Is the information accurate and complete?

    Teacher observations during group discussions (video and cultural generalizations activity)