Author:
Melody Casey
Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Level:
Middle School
Grade:
8
Tags:
  • GEDB
  • Global Education
  • License:
    Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial
    Language:
    English

    Education Standards

    GEDB Developing Analytical Reading Skills through a Study of Propaganda (Lesson 5 of 5)

    GEDB Developing Analytical Reading Skills through a Study of Propaganda (Lesson 5 of 5)

    Overview

    Confronting the Facts - Today we will confront the facts head-on! Today we will use all of the information that we have at our very fingertips to learn the facts. Today we will look at research that has already been done to find what the experts have said about propaganda and finding the truth. This lesson was developed by Sheila Wood as part of their completion of the North Carolina Global Educator Digital Badge program. This lesson plan has been vetted at the local and state level for standards alignment, Global Education focus, and content accuracy.

    Lesson Plan

    Description

    Confronting the Facts - Today we will confront the facts head-on! Today we will use all of the information that we have at our very fingertips to learn the facts. Today we will look at research that has already been done to find what the experts have said about propaganda and finding the truth.


    Learning Targets and Criteria for Success

    Students will determine the arguments of multiple authors/ sources and will trace how those arguments are developed, and analyze conflicting perspectives


    Learning Tasks and Practice

    This lesson may take two days, depending on the depth that you and the students want to delve into the intelligence.

    Students will have a copy of research done in 2005 by Anup Shah titled “War, Propaganda and the Media” and will use what they have already learned to reach a consensus for a war strategy.

    Students will be given a possible scenario and will try to determine how the various media outlets and politicians would respond.  (The possible scenarios have all happened previously, but the students do not know that, so they will have the opportunity to try to discover how people would react and then later see how that scenario played out in real life.)

    The possible scenarios are: The Bay of Pigs (1961), The Cuban Missile Crisis (1962), the Iranian hostage situation (1981), and the 9/11 attacks (2001). 

    Each small group will be given a packet with vital information and will try to determine what would be the best course of action.  The final question is: Should we go to war over this or not?  If not, what response should the U.S. make?


    Collecting and Documenting Evidence of Learning

    How would you advise the President of the United States of this issue? Write a short response.