Author:
Marian Faulkner
Subject:
Visual Arts, English Language Arts, Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson
Level:
Lower Primary
Grade:
2
Tags:
  • #Emerging CRT
  • #EmergingCRT
  • GEDB
  • Global Education
  • emergingcrt
  • License:
    Creative Commons Attribution
    Language:
    English

    Education Standards

    GEDB Folktales from Around the World: Cinderella Stories (Lesson 2 of 4) with addition of Creating a Modern Cinderella Story

    GEDB Folktales from Around the World: Cinderella Stories (Lesson 2 of 4) with addition of Creating a Modern Cinderella Story

    Overview

    Students will compare and contrast two or more versions of the same story (e.g., Cinderella stories) by different authors or from different cultures. The students will be able to understand how the cultures differ in food, language and arts through the two stories that are being compared and contrasted. Then, the students will use these tools that they know to help broaden and expand their cultural views by intergrating the folktales into the math, language arts and social studies curriculum.

    This lesson was developed by Lisa Bruet as part of their completion of the North Carolina Global Educator Digital Badge program. This lesson plan has been vetted at the local and state level for standards alignment, Global Education focus, and content accuracy.            

    Lesson Plan

    Description

    In this global lesson, students will compare and contrast two or more versions of the same story (e.g., Cinderella stories) by different authors or from different cultures. The students will be able to understand how the cultures differ in food, language and arts through the two stories that are being compared and contrasted. Then, the students will use these tools that they know to help broaden and expand their cultural views by intergrating the folktales into the math, language arts and social studies curriculum.


    Content

    Student Engagement/Motivation

    Focus Question:  How can versions of the same story help us to learn how to gain respect for different cultures around the world?

    The students will be in a whole group setting for the focus question.  The teacher will ask the question and let the students think for about thirty seconds quietly before letting them respond.  The students will respond how a folktale text will help them learn to respect and show compassion for other cultures around the world. 


    Learning Targets and Criteria for Success

    Essential Questions:

    EQ ELA:   What is the central message of the text?  

    EQ ELA:  How can I retell what happened from the beginning of the story to the end?

    EQ SS:  How can we show respect for other cultures using a variety of texts?

    Learning Targets:

    I can compare and contrast different events of a story e.g. setting, characters, and events.

    I can retell major events from the beginning, middle and end of the story.

    I can explain how to show respect through various stories from different cultures..

    Critera for Success: 

    I will compare and contrast two versions of the same story by different author of from different cultures. 

    I will make real life connections and describe in detail the events that happened in the story.

    I will show respect for other cultures through reading a variety of Cinderella texts. 


    Supplies/Resources

    World Map to show country on map 

    Chart Paper

    Markers

    BME Sheet (Beginning, Middle and Ending) 

    Problem & Solution Sheet

    Internet Sites: http://rubistar.4teachers.org

      http://www.getepic.com

      http://www.viewpure.com

    Book:  Any Cinderella text

    Cinderella Stories from Countries Around the World

    • Domitila:  A Cinderella Tale from the Mexican Tradition  by Jewell Reinhart Coburn
    • The Korean Cinderella by Shirley Climo
    • The Persian Cinderella by Shirley Climo
    • The Irish Cinderlad by Shirley Climo
    • The Egyptian Cinderella by Shirley Climo
    • Yeh-Shen: A Cinderella Story from China  by Ai-Ling-Louie
    • Cinder Edna by Ellen Jackson
    • Cinder-Elly  by Frances Minters
    • Prince Cinders by Babette Cole
    • Rough Faced Girl by Rafe Matin and David Shannon
    • Cinderella by Grimm Brothers

    Learning Tasks and Practice

    Day 1: Any version of a Cinderella text

    Building Background: What connections can you make to this selection?  (text-to-text, text-to-self, text-to-world)  

    The teacher asks the class:  Cinderella- Ever hear of that word?  What do you know or have heard about Cinderella?  Is Cinderella a Person, Place or Thing? (prompting students for answers)   

    Using chart paper write their responses on paper.  Some students might answer: Cinderella is a person who is poor and goes to a fancy ball and the pumpkin turns into a carriage.  The teacher can use the internet to show pictures of these images by using Google Search. For English Language Learners (ELL), the images of Cinderella will help with gaining the understanding of the unknown terms in text. 

    The teacher will start by asking the class:  What is a folktale?  Teacher records the students answers on chart paper so that it can be referred back to at a later date in lesson.   A folktale is a story handed down from generation to generation usually by oral retelling with a basis in events that are true to life or nature.  Folktales usually have one character that is wicked and one character that is good and the goodness gets rewarded in the story, such as Cinderella and Snow White. 

    The teacher will introduce the vocabulary words in the book to the class which are: slipper, bedaubed, wand, mouse-colored, pumpkin, dapple-gray, godmother, pinner, lace up, stomacher, citron, jestingly, coachman, headdress, uncivil, ironed, collation, petticoat, and awry.   

    Next, the teacher will then show the full cover of the book around the classroom asking probing questions such as:  What do you see on this book cover?  Can someone describe in details?  

    Who do you think this person/character is in related to the story?  (Depending on the Cinderella text the questions will vary)

    The teacher will read the title of the book, Cinderella, and ask the following guided questions to the class:  Who is Cinderella and what is her job?  How many daughters does Cinderella's stepmother have in this story?  The teacher can either have students write down answers to the guided questions or answer orally.  If the teacher chooses to have students write on paper, have the students use a yellow highlighter to trace over their answers.  (Highlighting prevents students from going back and changing the answers)

    The teacher will start to read the story to the class and stop at certain points to discuss the beginning events of the story.  The teacher will continue this procedure while reading the middle of story and continuing on to the ending.   (Since the focus question for the day is to describe what happens in the story the class might not finish reading the text due to time constraints which is fine and can be concluded the next teaching day.) Our goal is for the students to gain understanding of the overall structure of the story. 

    After the teacher has finished reading the text to the class and discussion has concluded, he/she will model methods for completing the BME (beginning, middle, ending) interactive sheet.  If the teacher stopped at the beginning of the story then the class will only write about the B (beginning) part of the story. Depending of the time alloted for literacy the book might not be completed.  Describe what happens in the story Cinderella.  Tell what happens in the beginning, middle and the end of the story. 

    Day 1 Exit Slip Question:   How many important details can you list about Cinderella? 

    Reflection Journal Prompt:   Why do you think the author created their own version of the same story?  

       * The teacher will select either the Exit Slip or Journal Prompt for his/her students to answer depending on whether how far the teacher read into the story of events. 

    ** If the book is not located in your library then the teacher can upload it from View Pure or Epic Books.  (Epic Books requires a login but the account is free to all educators and it is not required to teach this lesson.)

    Day 2:  Cinderella Stories

    The teacher will re-introduce the vocabulary words in the book to the class: slipper, bedaubed, wand, mouse-colored, pumpkin, dapple-gray, godmother, pinner, lace up, stomacher, citron, jestingly, coachman, headdress, uncivil, ironed, collation, petticoat, and awry.  

    The teacher will read the title of the book and ask the following guided questions to the class:  Can someone tell me what happened in the beginning of the story?  What happened to Cinderella's father that made her have to go live with her stepmother?   What are some similiarities that Cinderella and her stepsisters have in common?  What are their differences?Which culture (country) is represented in this story? 

    The teacher will start to read the story to the class and stop at certain points to discuss the beginning events of the story.  The teacher will continue this procedure while reading the middle of story and continuing on to the ending.  

    Our goal is for the students to gain understanding of the overall structure of the story. If the book is not located in your library then the teacher can upload it from View Pure or Epic Books with a free teacher account.

     After the teacher has finished reading the text to the class and discussion has concluded, he/she will model methods for completing the BME (beginning, middle, ending) interactive sheet.  If the teacher stopped at the beginning of the story then the class will only write about the B (beginning) part of the story. Depending of the time alloted for literacy, the book might not be completed.  If the book is not located in your library then the teacher can upload it from View Pure or Epic Books with a free teacher account.

    *Integrated into Social Studies:  Becoming a Folktale Investigator

    Using a classroom map or globe locate the name of the country that your Cinderella text represents.  Example:  The Egyptian Cinderella by Shirly Climo       Country- Egypt    

    The teacher will inform the students that they are going to become Folktale Investigators to help the local authorities with locating missing information about the Cinderella texts they are reading in class. The students will select one Cinderella story to use for their research. Then, they will choose a set of questions to use to help locate the countries information. The student can work by themselves or with a buddy.  The work will be done in class and the students will write the information in their global notebooks.  

       Just some suggested Cinderella Stories from Countries Around the World:

    • Domitila:  A Cinderella Tale from the Mexican Tradition  by Jewell Reinhart Coburn
    • The Korean Cinderella by Shirley Climo
    • The Persian Cinderella by Shirley Climo
    • The Irish Cinderlad by Shirley Climo
    • The Egyptian Cinderella by Shirley Climo
    • Yeh-Shen: A Cinderella Story from China  by Ai-Ling-Louie
    • Cinder Edna by Ellen Jackson
    • Cinder-Elly  by Frances Minters
    • Prince Cinders by Babette Cole

    After the students have selected their Cinderella book they will need to read the book by themselves to gain a better understanding of the materials.  Before reading, students should do a preview of the book to look for the people (characters), setting of the story, location (any landmarks), and are their animals in the story. After the students have completed reading the text and have a buddy they should discuss the events in the story.  If the students completely understand the story and are ready to become Investigators then they should be able to write the questions in global notebooks and answer in complete sentences. 

     1.  What examples can you find to help you find information on where your story takes place? 

     2. Where does this story come from?      How do you know?  The student will have to show proof that they know that their Cinderella text comes from the country _______ because of the character's clothing and the language that is spoken. 

     3. What evidence helped you to locate the country origin?  (pictures, people, clothing etc)

      4. What is the moral of the story? 

      5. How is this folktale different from what you already know?

      6. If you could be the author of the book, would you change how the story ends?  Explain. 

    Daily Exit Slip Questions and Reflection Journal Prompts

    Exit Slip Question:  What interesting details can you list about Cinderella?  

    Reflection Journal Prompt:  In the beginning of the story, can you name the characters and tell where the story takes place?  

      * The teacher will select either the Exit Slip or Journal Prompt for his/her students to answer depending on whether how far the teacher read into the story of events.

    Day 3: Cinderella Text (Compare and Contrasting) 

    The teacher should introduce a new Cinderella story (different country) on Day 3 so the students have enough time to compare and contrast the two versions of the text.

    * The teacher will start to read the story to the class and stop at certain points to discuss the beginning events of the story.  The teacher will continue this procedure while reading the middle of story and continuing on to the ending. Our goal is for the students to gain understanding of the overall structure of the story.

    After the teacher has finished reading the text to the class and discussion has concluded, he/she will model methods for completing the BME (beginning, middle, ending) interactive sheet.  If the teacher stopped at the beginning of the story then the class will only write about the B (beginning) part of the story. Depending of the time alloted for literacy the book might not be completed.  If the book is not located in your library then the teacher can upload it from View Pure or Epic Books with a free teacher account.  Describe what happens in the story Cinderella.  Tell what happens in the beginning, middle and the end of the story.  (Use the BME sheet in attachments)

    Integrated Art Lesson: Focus on illustrations in the Cinderella books selected. Students will compare and contrast illustrations from different cultural perspectives. How can you tell that this is a Cinderella story? What do you see in the illustrations that tells you that? Which illustration informs you more about the culture it is written about? Do the illustrations help you understand the story and culture represented better?

    Students could select a different version of Cinderella, research culture and create an illustration of their favorite part of the story. Illustration should include many details to inform viewer about selected culture.

    Integrated Social Studies Lesson: Depending on the two versions of Cinderella texts, the teacher will use the World Map to show students where each country is located and how far they are in relation to the United States?  Do you think that Country A is closer to the U.S.?  Do you think that Country B is closer to the U.S.?  Which country is closer to the equator?  What hemispheres are the two countries located?  Using the longitude and latitude lines can you locate the two countries exact coordinates on a real map?

    Integrated Math Lesson:  The teacher is still using the same two countries as above in the integrated Social Studies lesson. The teacher looks at the clock in the classroom and puts that time on his/her interactive clock.  The teacher asks the students, "Do you think that it is the same time in Country A as it is in North Carolina?  Wait for responses to move on to Country B. The teacher asks the students again "Do you think that it is the same time in Country B as it is in North Carolina?"

    The teacher waits for responses from the class.  Lastly, the teacher asks, "Do you think that it is the same time in Country A as it is in Country B?"   

    Example: If the time is 1:15pm on Monday in North Carolina, would it be the same time in China or Egypt?  Wait for children to respond.  The teacher would have to explain that China and Egypt are located in different time zones then the United States. So, since China is thirteen hours ahead of the United States, the time would be 2:15 am Tuesday morning. As for the country of Egypt, they are seven hours ahead of the United States. (US 1:15pm  equals Egypt 8:15pm)

    Questions: 

    If it is 12:30 pm in North Carolina, what time would it be in China?  __________

    If it is 2:30 am in North Carolina, what would the time be in Egypt? _________

    Day 3 Exit Slip Question:  What word best describes the main character?

    Reflection Journal Prompt:   How are the step sisters and Cinderella different?  How are they alike?

     * The teacher will select either the Exit Slip or Journal Prompt for his/her students to answer depending on whether how far the teacher read into the story of events.

    Day 4:  Cinderella Stories

    The teacher will re-read the Cinderella text and ask the following guided questions to the class:  Can someone describe what happens in this Cinderella story. Tell what happens in the beginning, the middle, and the end of story. What is the central message of the story?

    Compare and contrast two or more versions of the same story (e.g., Cinderella stories) by different authors or from different cultures. If the book is not located in your library then the teacher can upload it from View Pure or Epic Books with a free teacher account.

    The teacher will start to read the story to the class and stop at certain points to discuss the beginning events of the story.  The teacher will continue this procedure while reading the middle of story and continuing on to the ending.  

    Our goal is for the students to gain understanding of the overall structure of the story.  The teacher could either read aloud, watch the video on View Pure, or show the book under the document camera to project on the whiteboard screen.  After reading the text the teacher will have student pull out their global notebooks to write the vocabulary words in it.  The teacher will model and then check the students understanding before sending the off for independent vocabulary work. 

    Independent Vocabulary Work:  slipper, bedaubed, wand, pumpkin,  godmother, pinner, stomacher, citron, jestingly, coachman, headdress, uncivil, ironed, collation, petticoat, and awry.  

    The teacher will model how to use a dictionary to look up the vocabulary words.  The students will read the definition in the book and then create an appropriate sentence using the vocabulary word. Then, the students will illustrate the sentence. The students should select ten (10) words to look up definitions and use each one in a sentence. 

        Example:  My friend, Elly, loves her Hello Kitty slippers that I bought for her birthday.  

      Definition-  Slippers- A comfortable slip-on shoe that is worn indoors.

    Integrated Math Activity into the Cinderella texts

    Focus Question: How are the coins for the United States of America and similiar or different to your country?

    The teacher will show the students the currency for the folktale country text read for that week by using the Internet website.  Next, the teacher will show the currency for the United States and ask the students: What do you notice about the two currencies?  What are their similiarities?  What are the differences?  How much are each coin worth?  

    (Cinderella) Math Games  Example-Egypt    The Egyptian Cinderella by Shirley Climo

    The teacher will need to locate Egyptian numerals from 1-10 on the Internet using Google Search.  There are many free choices to choose from and the teacher can select one to their liking.  The teacher will have to model drawing the numbers first, and then have the students draw each number one by one for practice before sending them off independently to work. 

    Students will create a math lesson using the current math concepts being taught for that week of school. The teacher will say, "Today, we are learning about adding 2-digit and 3-digit math problems."  Your task is to create story problems using the Egyptian Numerals instead of the English numbers. 

    Integrated Social Studies lesson

    The teacher will use the classroom map or globe to locate (Egypt).  If the classroom is equipped with a document camera and whiteboard then project a world map for the whole class to view using Google search images. Once the country is located the teacher will ask: What other countries border our country ______?  Does our country ___ border any major bodies of water?  Is our country ____ on a continent?  If so, which one ___?    Has anyone ever visited our country___? What was it like? 

    The teacher could also use Google Earth and take a virtual trip to the country of choice to give the students a better perspective view on what the land, homes, buildings and structures look like. 

    Integrated Writing Lesson 

    During independent time, the students will be writing and creating a party invitation.  Just like in the book, Cinderella, everyone who attended the ball received an invitation.  Each student will choose one of the characters that they would like to invite to the party.  The student will need to let the character know what kind of party they will be attending and what the occasion is.  


    Technological Engagement

    If the teacher/classroom is equipped with iPads or computers, then the following websites can be used for your EC and ELL learners:

    Reading Rainbow- https://www.readingrainbow.org    Search-Mufaro's Beautiful Daughters

    Epic Books-  www.getepic.com        Sign Up for FREE for teachers 

    http://rubistar.4teachers.org  For teachers to create Rubrics


    Technological Engagement

    Internet Sites: Free to Educators

    ReadingRainbow  

    EpicBooks   www.getepic.com  


    Collecting and Documenting Evidence of Learning

    The students will be using their global notebooks during their cross country adventures and the teacher will circulate around the room for ancedotal notes. 


    Teacher Reflection of Learning

    My students really enjoyed this lesson especially when it came to the integration of the other content areas. My students are more visual-kinesthetic than auditory-visual learners. For this lesson, I would have added a day 5 to complete all the tasks.  When my students were working in the lesson we were scrambling to finish on time.  Also, the integrated content lessons could be done as Independent time instead of instructional time on a set day. 


    Additional Cinderella Stories

    Examples of Cinderella Stories from Around the World that may be used in this lesson:

    • The Korean Cinderella by Shirley Climo
    • The Persian Cinderella by Shirley Climo
    • The Irish Cinderlad by Shirley Climo
    • The Egyptian Cinderella by 
    • Yeh-Shen: A Cinderella Story from China  by Ai-Ling-Louie

    Cinder Edna by Ellen Jackson

    Create your own Modern Cinderella story

    After completing the above activities, students will be able to name the key characteristics and plot of Cinderella stories from multiple countries and can use those elements to create a modern Cinderella story. Start this process by discussing the themes that were found in most if not all of the Cinderella stories -  the value of kindness, the negative effects of bullying, and how good prevails. The new stories will need to stay true to at least one of the themes of the original Cinderella. 

    Students will discuss in groups what features of the Cinderella stories they read would be important to keep and which things would need to change to make it a "modern" story. Teachers should define modern and discuss some examples. For example, a limosine instead of a carriage or a prom instead of a ball. Students can create a list of elements from the original stories and add another column to change them to modern items. 

    Students can write and illustrate their story on paper or using a online comic strip or storyboard maker. Students will present their stories to the class and as other groups observe, they will take notes on what is modern, what stays turn to the original and what the main theme was.