Author:
DAWNE COKER
Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab, Lesson, Lesson Plan
Level:
Lower Primary
Tags:
  • Cl7Lesson
  • Cluster 7
  • Compose
  • Decompose
  • Place Value
  • Teen
  • Unit 7
    License:
    Creative Commons Attribution
    Language:
    English
    Media Formats:
    Downloadable docs

    Education Standards

    T4T Building Teen Numbers

    T4T Building Teen Numbers

    Overview

    This resource is from Tools4NCTeachers.

    This lesson calls for students to use a ten frame to represent ten ones. Students will demonstrate and verbalize that ten objects is the same as “ten”. They will model teen numbers as ten ones and some extra ones, and demonstrate an understanding that one manipulative goes in each square of the ten frame (builds on one to one understanding).

    Remix this lesson to share extension ideas or student work-samples.

    Here is an excerpt from the lesson.  Click the attachment to view the entire, fully-formatted lesson and materials.

     

    Building Teen Numbers

     

     

    This lesson calls for students to use a ten frame to represent ten ones. Students will demonstrate and verbalize that ten objects is the same as “ten”. They will model teen numbers as ten ones and some extra ones, and demonstrate an understanding that one manipulative goes in each square of the ten frame (builds on one to one understanding).

     

     

    Common Core Standards:

    Build foundation for place value.

    NC.K.NBT.1 Compose and decompose numbers from 11 to 19 into ten ones and some further ones by:

      • Using objects or drawings.
      • Recording each composition or decomposition by a drawing or expression.
      • Understanding that these numbers are composed of ten ones and one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine ones.

     

    Additional/Supporting Standards:

    Count to tell the number of objects.

    NC.K.CC.4 Understand the relationship between numbers and quantities.

    • When counting objects, say the number names in the standard order, pairing each object with one and only one number name and each number name with one and only one object (one-to-one correspondence).
    • Recognize that the last number named tells the number of objects counted regardless of their arrangement (cardinality).
    • State the number of objects in a group, of up to 5 objects, without counting the objects (perceptual subitizing)

    K.CC.5 Count to answer “How many?” in the following situations:

    • Given a number from 1–20, count out that many objects.
    • Given up to 20 objects, name the next successive number when an object is added, recognizing the quantity is one more/greater.
    • Given 20 objects arranged in a line, a rectangular array, and a circle, identify how many.
    • Given 10 objects in a scattered arrangement, identify how many.

     

    Standards for Mathematical Practice:

    1.   Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.

    1. Model with mathematics.
    2. Use appropriate tools strategically.
    3. Attend to precision
    4. Look for and make use of structure.

     

    Student Outcomes:

      • I can use a ten frame to represent ten ones.
      • I can verbalize that ten objects is the same as the number ten.
      • I can model teen numbers as ten ones and some extra ones.
      • I can demonstrate an understanding that one manipulative goes in each square (builds on one to one understanding).

     

    Materials:

      • Ten Frame (per student)
      • 15 counters (per student)
      • Teen Number Cards 11-15 (per student)
      • Painter’s tape to make ten frame on carpet (this ten frame will be used for following lessons, so it can be left on the floor)

     

    Advance Preparation: Materials Preparation:

      • Create a ten frame in the middle of student’s gathering place using painter’s tape. Boxes should be large enough for students to stand or sit in.
      • Each student will need a ten frame, 15 counters and a set of teen number cards put in a bag prior to the lesson beginning.
      • Teacher will need a demonstration set for board or SMART board.

    Prior Lessons:

      • Students will be fluent with one to one correspondence to identify how many objects are in a group (up to ten).
      • Students will have used ten frames with quantities one to ten.

    Thinking Preparation:

      • Plan for misconceptions listed below.
      • In between building each number, clear board so students see ten ones going into ten frame each time to reinforce idea that only ten ones will fit in ten frame and to facilitate counting on from ten.

     

    Directions:

    1. Gather students at the carpet.
    2. Ask ten students to stand up so they are visible to all (not using the ten frame).
    3. Have a student leader count how many students are standing.
      1. Possible questions to pose: How do you know there are students? Could there be another way to figure out how many students are standing?
    4. Draw students’ attention to ten frame on the carpet. The teacher will facilitate and guide students to identify there are ten squares, only one item goes in each square, there are five in the top row and five in the bottom row.
    5. Teacher and students work together to move students into the ten frame and count out loud as each one is added to the frame.
      1. Students should describe the difference in counting the group with and without the ten frame. (Students should quickly see there are ten because all squares are full.)
      2. Possible questions to pose: How did we fill the ten frame? What did we do as we filled the ten frame? How do we know how many are in the ten frame?
    6. Choose 12 new students and have students put themselves into the ten frame one at a time. The class will verbally count as they go. Upon getting to 10, have students share what they notice and what can be done next. Students will identify they cannot fit in the frame and will be extra ones on the side.
    7. Students will continue by making number 14 in same manner and share similar observations.
      1. Possible questions to pose: How did we fill the ten frame? What did we do as we filled the ten frame? How do we know how many are in the ten frame?
    8. Students are given bag of manipulatives, teen number cards and a ten frame. Students will work for seven to ten minutes to build each teen number using the ten frame. Students will flip over a number and then build the number.
      1. During student’s independent work, the teacher is walking around conducting informal observations of students’ understanding and mastery of show teen numbers as ten ones and some extra ones.
      2. While observing, identify students who can share when the class is brought back together. Decide the order for students to share with the group based on use of strategies (for example: Students who began with a misconception and then problem solved to correct. Students who count by ones. Students who counted on from ten.)
    9. Students are then brought back together.
    10. Students identified by teacher observations during their work time will share strategies with the class.
      1. End lesson by reviewing students should be able to identify: How did we fill the ten frame? What did we do as we filled the ten frame? How do we know how many are in the ten frame? How do we know how many we have all together?

     

    Questions to Pose:

    Before:

      • What can we do to figure out how many students are standing? (count each one, identify five and count on, etc.)
      • How is 11 different than 10? (compare other totals to ten)

    During:

      • How does the ten frame help us to count?
      • How did you build the number?
      • How did you count?
      • What happens when there are more than ten?
      • How many did you have left over?
      • Where can the extra ones go?

    After:

      • How did you count?
      • What are some ways you built the various numbers?
      • What do you do if you have more than ten?
      • How is the number 12 different than 10?
      • How is the number 15 different than 11?
      • What do the numbers 11-15 have in common?

     

    Possible Misconceptions/Suggestions:

    Possible Misconceptions

    Suggestions

    More than one manipulative can go in each square.

    Remind students the ten frame is a tool to help us see how many. It is building on one to one and when we count using one finger we only touch one at a time.

    Saying the filled ten frame is one instead of ten (ones).

    Rebuild ten frame, and count each one as it is placed in the ten frame.

    When identifying the total, student counts the ones on the ten frame (says ten), then counts the ones off the ten frame (says three) and identifies their total as three instead of 13.

    Review counting across and down the ten frame and then ensuring they count on when counting the extras ones off the ten fame.

     

    Special Notes:

    Students will need repeated exposure in using ten frame and teen numbers to identify teen numbers as ten ones and some extra ones.

     

    If lesson is repeated, Sixteen Runaway Pumpkins by Dianne Ochiltree can be read and instead of using counters, students could use small pumpkins in ten frame (pictures).

     

    Solutions:

    Students should identify teen numbers 11-15 as ten ones and some extra ones.

     

    Blackline Master:  Number Cards

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    11

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    11

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    11

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    11

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    11

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    Blackline Master: Ten Frames

     

     

     

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

     

    Name:                                                                                           Date:                                                                                                  

     

    Assessment: Students will show the teen number as ten ones and some ones left over.

     

             

    11

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

             

    15

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

             

    12