Author:
Joanna Schimizzi
Subject:
Mathematics, Physical Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Level:
Lower Primary
Tags:
License:
Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike
Language:
English

Education Standards

Student Handout for “How Far Will it Go?”

Student Handout for “How Far Will it Go?”

Overview

This is a remix of a NASA resource that describes the forces of a rocket launch and uses non-standard units of measurement to collect data. The remix has added further details for students and also added a mention of Katherine Johnson and her contribution to space calculations. This student-facing handout has embedded links and a data table and is designed for a 1st grade math and science integration. 

Student Handout

Student Name ___________________________

 

Student Handout for “How Far Will it Go?”

Created from NASA “How Far Will it Go?”, CC0 (Public Domain)  

 

Math - NC.1.MD.2 Measure lengths with non-standard units.

  • Express the length of an object as a whole number of non-standard length units.

  • Measure by laying multiple copies of a shorter object (the length unit) end to end (iterating) with no gaps or overlaps.

Science - 1.P.1 Understand how forces (pushes or pulls) affect the motion of an object.

  • 1.P.1.1 Explain the importance of a push or pull to changing the motion of an object.

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Watch this video of the launch of the NASA Space Shuttle Atlantis in 2009 as it goes to the International Space Station. 

* Watch it one time from minute 0:00 until at least minute 4:42.

* Watch it again. Your teacher will pause it at certain times.

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  1. Your teacher paused the video at 1:38. Draw a picture of the space shuttle and rockets as it launches.

  • Describe where the flames are located using descriptive words.










 

  1. Your teacher paused the video at minute 2:14. The rocket has traveled almost ________ miles down range from the Kennedy Space Shuttle. (This means 6 miles horizontally away from the launch pad.) 

 

  1. Your teacher paused the video at minute 3:08.  The rocket has traveled almost ________ miles down range from the Kennedy Space Shuttle. (This means _______ miles horizontally away from the launch pad.) 


 

  1. Your teacher paused the video at minute 4:42.  The rocket has traveled almost ________ miles down range from the Kennedy Space Shuttle. (This means ________ miles horizontally away from the launch pad.) 

 

  1. The flames coming out of the rockets are burning the gas fuel and are ______________ the space shuttle away from Earth. 

 

  1. This rocket contained 500,000 gallons of gas fuel. 

  • What do you think would happen if there were 700,000 gallons of fuel?

 

 

  • What do you think would happen if there were 300,000 gallons of fuel?

 

  1. Your teacher has set up a launch pad. Draw a picture of the launch pad. Draw an arrow to show which way your rocket will travel horizontally. 








 

  1. Your teacher has set up a shuttle with a single rocket. Draw a picture of the shuttle and rocket.








 

  1. What will be the fuel for your rocket?





 

  1. In the real space shuttle, the burning of the fuel pushed the rocket away from the Earth. In our experiment, letting the ___________ escape from the __________ will push the space shuttle forward.




 

  1. The video measured how far the space shuttle traveled using a standard form of measurement called miles. This is because a mile is always the same distance (5,280 feet). Your experiment will use non-standard units of measurement, like a pencil or paper clip. They are called non-standard units because one paper clip might be longer than the other. As long as you use the same type of paper clip, you can line them up end-to-end and use that to measure. 

  • What non-standard unit of measurement is your class going to use to measure how far your rocket moves?


 

  1. Let’s do our experiment to see how the force of our “rocket fuel” moves our rocket. We will do the experiment 8 times, each time increasing the amount of fuel, but measuring each amount of fuel twice.

  • Make a prediction about what you think will happen if we increase the amount of fuel in our rocket.

 

If we increase the amount of fuel in our rocket, then...




 

Data Table

 


Amount of Fuel (Number of ______________)

Distance traveled (in _________________)

1 breath and 1 breath

____________________ and ____________________

2 breaths and 2 breaths

____________________ and ____________________

3 breaths and 3 breaths

____________________ and ____________________

4 breaths and 4 breaths

____________________ and ____________________

 

 
  
  
  
  

 

  1. What did you notice about increasing the amount of fuel in your rocket?



 

  1. What happens when your rocket runs out of fuel?



 

  1. A force in science is described as a “push” or a “pull”. Was the force in your experiment a “push” or a “pull”? 


 

  1. Use a picture or words to “Explain the importance of a push or pull to changing the motion (movement) of an object.”








 

  1. What is the push of a real space rocket doing for the space shuttle?



 

  1. Why do you think NASA needs to be able to estimate how far rockets can go per amount of fuel?


 

  1. At this point in space exploration, all of the fuel is estimated by computers. But in 1962, John Glenn was preparing to orbit the Earth and wanted to make sure computers didn’t make a mistake. He asked for Katherine Johnson to calculate the estimates by hand. Read more about Katherine Johnson and then explain why it is important to calculate measurements more than one time.