Author:
Melody Casey
Subject:
Arts Education
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Level:
High School
Grade:
9, 10, 11, 12
Tags:
  • GEDB
  • Global Education
  • License:
    Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial
    Language:
    English

    GEDB Explore the World Through Art: Country Mandala Project (Lesson 3 of 5)

    GEDB Explore the World Through Art: Country Mandala Project (Lesson 3 of 5)

    Overview

    Students continue learning and researching their country's culture to complete a mandala. In their mandala, they will use the symbols, colors, landmarks, and history of their country's culture to complete a radial balanced mandala. A mandala symbolizes the wholeness and unity of the universe. Students will look at examples of rose glass windows, research hinduism and buddhism culture's to become inspired to create their own take on a mandala representing their own country's culture. This lesson was developed by Danielle Gaimari as part of their completion of the North Carolina Global Educator Digital Badge program. This lesson plan has been vetted at the local and state level for standards alignment, Global Education focus, and content accuracy.            

    Lesson Plan

    Description

    Students continue learning and researching their country's culture to complete a mandala. In their mandala, they will use the symbols, colors, landmarks, and history of their country's culture to complete a radial balanced mandala. A mandala symbolizes the wholeness and unity of the universe. Students will look at examples of rose glass windows, research hinduism and buddhism culture's to become inspired to create their own take on a mandala representing their own country's culture.


    Content

    Learning Targets and Criteria for Success

    • Students will explore the history of their foreign country.
    • Students will analyze the effects of logos and symbols by researching their country’s iconic images.
    • Students will understand using the element of color in an artwork.
    • Students will discuss, understand, and implement art elements (line, color, shape, texture) and design principles (balance, emphasis). 

    Supplies/Resources

    • 12 x 12 inch size final Paper
    • Colored Pencils
    • Erasers
    • Pencils
    • Sharpers
    • Tracing Paper
    • Laptops and access to the internet.
    • Sketchbooks/Scrap paper to create thumbnail sketches.

    Learning Tasks and Practice

    Day one: Introduction to Color Theory

    • PowerPoint® Presentation and notes taken on color theory (See attached Color Theory PowerPoint). 

     

    Day two: Introduction Mandala in a class discussion. Have the students research the following information,

    • What is a Mandala?
    • Where do Mandalas come from? 
    • What different cultures use Mandalas?
    • Bring the class back together to discuss their findings on Mandalas. 
    • Teacher will have the students complete a Color Pencil Blending, Intensity & Value Handout (See attachment). 
    • Students will start brainstorming their thumbnail sketches using the Country Traveling Research Question Handout (See Lesson 1).  
      • They will use Question 15: What are 5 symbols that represent your country?
        • Ask students to answer these questions: What makes those symbols special? Why do they represent the county? 
        • After answering those questions, students should practice drawing at least 3 of them. 
      • Challenge students by asking them to figure out how to use 4 or all of their symbols into a radial balanced mandala. 
      • Ask students to create 4 different thumbnail sketches using their country's symbols. Thumbnail sketches should be 6 inch by 6 inch.

     

    Day three: Brainstorm and sketching day

    • Students will create 4 1/4 sketches of their mandala using the symbols, landmarks, etc. to represent their country. 
      • When students have completed all 4, they should go see the teacher for approach to move onto the next step. 
    • Students will create a final thumbnail, 6 inch by 6 inch, and start coloring using the blending techniques learned( see attachment Color Pencil Blending, Intensity & Value Handout
      • Students should ask themselves, "How can I use color to represent my country throughout my mandala?" Encourage them to think about common colors found in their country, the colors of the flag, the colors throughout the streets, the colors of the foods, etc. 

     

    Day four: Studio and tracing paper day

    •  After students have colored their final sketches, it must be approved by the teacher before being to trace their final design onto the final paper. 
      • Students will use tracing paper to trace their design in this step. 
      • Tips for using tracing paper: 
        • Do not press down too hard. 
        • Do not outline your lines after you trace it. 
        • Do not use sharpie to outline. 
        • Make sure that the paper is flipped in the right direction so the mandala will be radially balanced. 

     

    Day five: Studio and tracing paper day

    • Everyone in the class should be finishing tracing their final design and moving onto the coloring stage. 
    • Make sure to go over the requirements with the class before they begin coloring (see attachment Country Mandala Project Checklist and Grading Rubric). 

     

    Days six and seven: Studio days

    • Students will continue coloring their projects using the following techniques: 
      • 1 color blend 
      • 2 color blend 
      • 3 color blend 
      • Burnishing (white colored pencil). 
      • Radial values (colors are all the same on each 1/4 of the mandala).
      • Adding texture through your use of lines. 
      • Layering is used to create bold, rich colors. 
    • By the end of class on day seven, students should hand their projects into the teacher with their response questions. 

    Collecting and Documenting Evidence of Learning

    Students will be assessed using a checklist, grading rubric and written reflection to see evidence of learning (See attachment in lesson called Country Mandala Project Checklist and Grading Rubric).


    Extended Learning Opportunities

    Students will continue becoming experts in their country by creating a unit of study to extend their knowledge.  The next series of projects students will complete will help put their discoveries into visual works.  I will be there to answer questions, show teacher made examples, and guide them step by step throughout each lesson of the unit.


    Teacher Reflection of Learning

    My students were still excited that they were working with their country for this project. I thought that a few of them might have lost interest with the idea we are still becoming an expert but they weren't.  It was great to still see them researching more symbols and finding out more information about their country.  Seeing how their minds were understanding there country better and how to create their mandala was incredible.  Many of their sketches surprised me, which helped me continue to be excited for this project.  There color pencil techniques and skills were rough at the beginning but they began to see how if you add more pressure the color becomes more bold, and how if you add two colors together they create a different feeling to their piece.