Author:
Melody Casey
Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Level:
Upper Primary
Grade:
3
Tags:
  • GEDB
  • Global Education
    License:
    Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial
    Language:
    English

    Education Standards

    GEDB Place Value in Habitats Around the World (Lesson 2 of 4)

    GEDB Place Value in Habitats Around the World (Lesson 2 of 4)

    Overview

    This lesson plan engages students in a discussion about their own perspectives on endangered animals and habitat reduction. Students will summarize the perspectives of their peers and their different reactions to the issue of endangered animals and habitat reduction. Students will learn about acceptance of differing opinions and how their perspective influences the way the interpret information and apply content. This lesson was developed by Ashley Harris as part of their completion of the North Carolina Global Educator Digital Badge program. This lesson plan has been vetted at the local and state level for standards alignment, Global Education focus, and content accuracy.            

    Lesson Plan

    Description

    This lesson plan engages students in a discussion about their own perspectives on endangered animals and habitat reduction. Students will summarize the perspectives of their peers and their different reactions to the issue of endangered animals and habitat reduction. Students will learn about acceptance of differing opinions and how their perspective influences the way the interpret information and apply content.


    Content

    Student Engagement/Motivation

    Students learned that the NC Eastern Cougar is extinct in the last lesson. They shared their thoughts on this animal’s extinction. Students were interested in hearing others perspectives when they worked in groups. They are excited to go back and read the posts to see how other’s views are similar and different from their own.

    Students will also watch a video clip and read the digital copy of the Science Spin “Desperate for Help.” This addresses the decreasing lemur population and the effect it will have on the forest habitat. Students will be able to make a connection about animals in our area and those around the world. Teachers without access to Scholastic Science Spin can access PBS Learning Media to watch a video on endangered species and/or watch videos and read facts on the Science Trek website.


    Learning Targets and Criteria for Success

    Learning Target(s)

    - I can summarize the perspectives and reactions of others and determine how they are similar and different from my own.

    - I can identify how my perspective influences the way I interpret information.

    Criteria for Success

    -Students will use Google classroom to read the posts from the previous lessons in order to see how others feel about the extinction of NC Eastern Cougars.  

    -Students will use chart paper and work in teams to create a list of the differing opinions they saw posted and add any additional perspectives that may not have been listed.

    -Students will reflect on the role their own perceptions play in the interpretation of information and choices they make.

    -Students will explore different habitats to determine which one they would like to focus on during their Habitats Around the World research.


    Supplies/Resources

    Computers, Smartboard, Googleclassroom, NCWildlife.org, Kidrex.org, notebooks, Science Spin or PBS Learning Media and Science Trek websites


    Learning Tasks and Practice

    Students will visit Google classroom and read the posts/comments from the previous lesson on cougar extinction. After reading students will work in teams to record a list of perceptions about the extinction of these animals in our area. Students will discuss differing viewpoints, such as students wanting to save the animals, stop hunting, reduce land development or students who agree with hunting of large animals, are afraid of cougars, etc. As a class we will discuss the role our perspectives play in interpreting information and situations. Students will record their reflections in their journals discussing how their perspective may be different than others and how that might lead them to interpret issues in various ways. Students will use this new understanding of their perspectives and those of others to choose a habitat that would be best for them to research. Students will complete a selection sheet and write about the reason they selected a certain habitat to explore.


    Technological Engagement

    Teacher will use the smartboard. A projector could also be used.

    Students will use computers/Google classroom to read posts and research habitats. If computers are not available for research, the teacher can provide books on various habitats oceans, savannas, forests, grasslands, deserts, etc.


    Collecting and Documenting Evidence of Learning

    Student learning will be assessed through observation of group discussion, as well as teacher review of student reflections and habitat selection sheet.


    Student Self-Reflection and Action Steps

    Students reflect on their learning through group discussion and the reflection journal entry. Students use this reflection to help them determine the best habitat for them to further research based on interest and their perceptions of the endangerment, animals, or habitat reduction/challenges.


    Feedback/Instructional Adjustments

    Feedback is given on habitat selection. Students have an opportunity to make changes at this point, if desired before moving onto the next step of the safari field guide.

    Future lessons may be adjusted based on student habitat selection or their perspectives on the challenges that face the animals or habitats.


    Extended Learning Opportunities

    Students having trouble selecting a habitat will be given additional time to research and determine their interest. Teacher guidance based on their animal interest and perspective may also be beneficial. Students who are successful in selecting a habitat will move onto the next component of the project and research animals that can be found there. 


    Teacher Reflection of Learning

    Students had different views on hunting and land development. Views also differed on the need for land development and the impact this has on animal habitats. Perceptions about human need over animal preservation was also addressed. Students discussed habitats around the world and the similarities in the issues faced regarding endangerment and habitat reduction. Differing views were presented about the roles we play and our influence on the environment. Students were respectful of others opinions.