Author:
KATHERINE KLYNSTRA
Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Level:
Upper Primary
Grade:
3
Tags:
  • #NCDLS
  • ncdls
    License:
    Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial
    Language:
    English

    Education Standards

    Remix-GEDB Introduction to Endangered Animals: Finding the Main Idea (Lesson 1 of 4)

    Remix-GEDB Introduction to Endangered Animals: Finding the Main Idea (Lesson 1 of 4)

    Overview

    Students will learn to find main idea in a nonfiction text about endangered rhinoceroses. Main idea should be taught prior to this lesson using reading strategies. Students should already know main idea is what the text is mainly about in one sentence. Students should be able to locate the main idea in the topic sentence, heading, last sentence of the text, and know it may be found in text features. This lesson was developed by Ashley Wondra as part of their completion of the North Carolina Global Educator Digital Badge program. This lesson plan has been vetted at the local and state level for standards alignment, Global Education focus, and content accuracy.

    Description

    Students will learn to find main idea in a nonfiction text about endangered rhinoceroses. Main idea should be taught prior to this lesson using reading strategies. Students should already know main idea is what the text is mainly about in one sentence. Students should be able to locate the main idea in the topic sentence, heading, last sentence of the text, and know it may be found in text features.

     

    Content

    Student Engagement/Motivation

    Most people have a natural curiosity and love for animals. Today, we will begin learning about endangered animals in our nonfiction reading and writing units. Teacher will ask students to name an animal they believe may be endangered. Student responses will be posted on the board.

     

    Learning Targets and Criteria for Success

    Learning Targets

    I can determine the main idea of a text and key details.

    I can use my knowledge about text features to help me determine the main idea.

    I can locate the author’s perspective. 

    I can build my background knowledge about endangered animals living in other countries.

     

    Criteria for Success

    I will use National Geographic Kids.com to research articles on rhinos.

    I will use text features to locate the main idea and details in a text.  

    I will work with a group to discuss the author's point of view and compare it to my own. 

     

    Supplies/Resources

    Computers, SMARTboard or projector

    NationalGeographickids.com 

    Rhinos Airlifted to New Home article-

    http://kids.nationalgeographic.com/explore/nature/rhinos-airlifted-to-new-home

    Any nonfiction book about cheetahs

    Helping Cheetahs: A Race to Survive article-

    https://kids.nationalgeographic.com/explore/nature/cheetahs-race-to-survive/#cheetahs-survival-classroom

    Chart paper with text features hanging around the classroom 

    (photos/captions, heading, bold print, italics, chart, map, sidebar)

    Markers

    Reading notebook

    Chart paper for creating a poster

    Main Idea Exit Ticket

    World Wildlife Fund e-card website- 

    http://wwf.worldwildlife.org/site/PageServer?pagename=WWF_Free_Ecards&_ga=2.216807891.495776190.1505024345-1643744332.1505024345

     

    Learning Tasks and Practice

    The teacher will begin by using Rhinos Airlifted to New Home article to model the learning task. The teacher will show students how to locate the text features like headings, bold words, pictures, captions, table of contents, chart, sidebar, glossary, or hyperlink. Teacher will use the same article to model using headings, pictures, captions and a hyperlink to find the main idea and author's point of view. The teacher will need any nonfiction book about cheetahs to model using any other text features to find the main idea. The teacher will show students the chart paper placed around the room. Each piece of chart paper should have a text feature displayed on it. The teacher will write the main idea of the text used on a sticky note. Then, the teacher will model by adding the sticky note to the chart that matches the text feature that helped locate the main idea. Finally, the teacher will read and discuss the author's point of view of the text and share their own point of view with the class. 

    The teacher should have copies of the Helping Cheetahs: A Race to Survive article, give students access to the same article or give each group a different article to analyze. Students will need a copy of the article for each group member to read or computers for the students to access it online. 

    1. Teacher says,"In groups of four, you will read, discuss, and decipher the information from the cheetahs article in order to collect the main idea and three details." 

    2. Students will take notes with their group and discuss the main idea and details. They will work together to determine the main idea of the text and write it on a sticky note along with three details.  

    3. One student from the group will place the sticky note response on the chart with the text feature that was most helpful to them when finding the main idea.  

    4. Students in the group will find the author’s point of view in the text and write it in their reading notebooks.

    5. One student from each group will be the spokesperson to share which text feature their group used to help them locate the main idea of the text. Students should also tell why the chosen text feature was helpful to their group and what the author’s point of view is in the text.           

    6. Students will complete the Main Idea Exit Ticket.

    7. Students can continue this lesson on the same day or a different day if more time is needed. 

     

    Technological Engagement

    Teacher will use the SMARTboard. A projector could also be used if the teacher does not have access to a SMARTboard. 

    Students will use computers to visit National Geographic Kids.com to read the article Helping Cheetahs: A Race to Survive. If computers are not available, the teacher can print the article for students to view and read.

    As an optional extention activity, students can send an e-postcard to family or friends to show how people can help endangered animals. See the extented learning opportunity section for more information. 

     

    Collecting and Documenting Evidence of Learning

    Students will work in a group of four to read the Helping Cheetahs: A Race to Survive article, take notes and find the main idea, and details. Students will write their main idea on a sticky note and place it on the text feature charts around the room to show what text feature helped their group find the main idea and details.Student learning will be assessed through observation of group discussion about the main idea and details. Students will also complete the Main Idea Exit Ticket.

     

    Student Self-Reflection and Action Steps

    Students will read all responses on the sticky notes and text features charts. They will be able to look back at their notes in the reading notebook. This will help students having difficulty finding or understanding main idea. The teacher will meet with students who are reluctant to share to ensure they are able to meet the instructional goals.

    In groups of two, students will reflect on their notes and main idea sticky note responses about the National Geographic article and the author’s perspective about what these animals face in other countries. 

     

    Feedback/Instructional Adjustments

    Student feedback is given after the teacher reviews student's sticky note response, reading notebook notes and whole class sharing. The teacher will give feedback about the poster each group creates. The teacher will evaluate the message to make sure students share the main idea, details and author’s perspective from their assigned text and the  Endangered Animal Project Rubric. The teacher will also give a grade and feedback after the Main Idea Exit Ticket is completed or used to reteach a small group. Subsequent lessons are adjusted based on student understanding and responses.

     

    Extended Learning Opportunities 

    Students will use their new information to write a letter to the US Congress about the threats the rhinos or cheetahs face. Students letters should include why action should be taken and how to help these animals overcome the threats they face. 

    Students could also read a nonfiction book or text during independent reading. While reading the text, students can write the main idea and supporting details in their reading response notebook. 

    Students will take the main idea/author’s perspective a step further and create a postcard with a paragraph explaining the threats cheetahs or rhino face and how people can take action and help these animals. To incorporate technology, students can go to the World Wildlife Fund- http://wwf.worldwildlife.org/site/PageServer?pagename=Friendship_Love_Ecards and send an e-postcard to someone in their family. Students will write a simple message of three to four sentences about threats facing cheetahs or rhinos and ask the recipent to help the animals. Students will list 2-3 ways to help. 

    Students will write an informational paragraph about cheetahs and type it into a word processing document. The paragraph could include who, what, when, where and why.

     

    Teacher Reflection of Learning

    I enjoyed reading each student's main idea and details sticky note and reading notebook notes that included the main idea and details. This was an easy way for me to assess students understanding. Students were very interested in learning more about the animals and how they became endangered. This will be an exciting unit! 

    Students will use their new information to write a letter in Google Docs to the US Congress about the threats the rhinos or cheetahs face. Students letters should include why action should be taken and how to help these animals overcome the threats they face. 

    Students will use the graphic organizer to help solidify their understanding of main idea/details. 

    Working with a partner, students will write an informational paragraph about cheetahs and type it into a google slide. The paragraph could include who, what, when, where and why. A main idea and details should also be included. The slide(s) should demonstrate understanding of endagered animals-cheetahs and students can be creative when making slideshow.