Updating search results...

Search Results (98)

View
Selected filters:
  • Teaching American History
Bill of Rights Part 2: The Politics of the Bill of Rights
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print

Bill of Rights Part 2: The Politics of the Bill of Rights

Rating
0.0 stars

In this lesson, students analyze primary source documents related to the creation of the U.S. Bill of Rights. Students cite evidence to explain how the location and the content of Madison's nine proposals presented on June 8th to Congress, to make alterations to the Articles of the Constitution, were altered by Congress and led to the creation of the U.S. Bill of Rights.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Teaching American History
Date Added:
07/06/2017
Bill of Rights Part I: The Origin of the Bill of Rights
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print

Bill of Rights Part I: The Origin of the Bill of Rights

Rating
0.0 stars

In this lesson, students analyse English and colonial documents and State Constitutions and justify if the rights within the U.S. Bill of Rights are more inherited from the English and/or Colonial traditions or created from the revoluntionary period (1776-1787) in the United States.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Teaching American History
Date Added:
07/06/2017
Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka I and II
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print

Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka I and II

Rating
0.0 stars

This resource informs students about the Supreme Court case, Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka I and II. Since the Supreme Court’s decision in Plessy v. Ferguson, the doctrine of “separate but equal” legalized racial segregation in the United States. The Supreme Court finally rejected that doctrine in 1954 on the ground that segregated schools led to unequal educational opportunities for white and black students, which in turn had negative psychological effects on the self-image of black children. The end of legal segregation was cause for great hope and inspiration to Civil Rights leaders. When novelist Ralph Ellison heard the Court’s decision he wrote, “Another battle of the Civil War has been won. … What a wonderful world of possibilities are unfolded for the children!”

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Teaching American History
Date Added:
07/06/2017
Dred Scott v. Sandford
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print

Dred Scott v. Sandford

Rating
0.0 stars

This resource informs students about the Supreme Court case,Dred Scott v Sanford. The slave Dred Scott sued for his freedom in court because his former master had taken him to live where slavery had been prohibited by Congress through the Northwest Ordinance of 1787 and the Missouri Compromise of 1820.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Teaching American History
Date Added:
07/06/2017
Federalist 10: Democratic Republic vs. Pure Democracy

Federalist 10: Democratic Republic vs. Pure Democracy

Rating
0.0 stars

In this lesson, students define faction in Federalist 10, analyze present day issues and determine if they qualify as a faction as defined in Federalist 10, and explain why Madison advocated for a democratic republic form of government over a pure democracy in Federalist 10.

Subject:
Civics and Economics
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Teaching American History
Author:
Teaching American History
Date Added:
02/26/2019
Federalist No. 11 Publius (Alexander Hamilton)
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print

Federalist No. 11 Publius (Alexander Hamilton)

Rating
0.0 stars

This resource provides information on Federalist No. 11. The Federalist Papers were originally newspaper essays written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay under the pseudonym Publius, whose immediate goal was to persuade the people of New York to ratify the constitution.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Teaching American History
Date Added:
06/29/2017
Federalist No. 12 Publius (Alexander Hamilton)
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print

Federalist No. 12 Publius (Alexander Hamilton)

Rating
0.0 stars

This resource provides information on Federalist No. 12. The Federalist Papers were originally newspaper essays written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay under the pseudonym Publius, whose immediate goal was to persuade the people of New York to ratify the constitution.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Teaching American History
Date Added:
06/29/2017
Federalist No. 13 Publius (Alexander Hamilton)
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print

Federalist No. 13 Publius (Alexander Hamilton)

Rating
0.0 stars

This resource provides information on Federalist No. 13. The Federalist Papers were originally newspaper essays written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay under the pseudonym Publius, whose immediate goal was to persuade the people of New York to ratify the constitution.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Teaching American History
Date Added:
06/29/2017
Federalist No. 14 Publius (James Madison)
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print

Federalist No. 14 Publius (James Madison)

Rating
0.0 stars

This resource provides information on Federalist No. 14. The Federalist Papers were originally newspaper essays written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay under the pseudonym Publius, whose immediate goal was to persuade the people of New York to ratify the constitution.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Teaching American History
Date Added:
06/29/2017
Federalist No. 15 Publius (Alexander Hamilton)
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print

Federalist No. 15 Publius (Alexander Hamilton)

Rating
0.0 stars

This resource provides information on Federalist No. 15. The Federalist Papers were originally newspaper essays written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay under the pseudonym Publius, whose immediate goal was to persuade the people of New York to ratify the constitution.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Teaching American History
Date Added:
06/29/2017
Federalist No. 16 Publius (Hamilton)
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print

Federalist No. 16 Publius (Hamilton)

Rating
0.0 stars

This resource provides information on Federalist No. 16. The Federalist Papers were originally newspaper essays written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay under the pseudonym Publius, whose immediate goal was to persuade the people of New York to ratify the constitution.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Teaching American History
Date Added:
06/29/2017
Federalist No. 17 Publius (Alexander Hamilton)
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print

Federalist No. 17 Publius (Alexander Hamilton)

Rating
0.0 stars

This resource provides information on Federalist No. 17. The Federalist Papers were originally newspaper essays written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay under the pseudonym Publius, whose immediate goal was to persuade the people of New York to ratify the constitution.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Teaching American History
Date Added:
06/29/2017
Federalist No. 18 Publius (Madison with Hamilton)
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print

Federalist No. 18 Publius (Madison with Hamilton)

Rating
0.0 stars

This resource provides information on Federalist No. 18. The Federalist Papers were originally newspaper essays written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay under the pseudonym Publius, whose immediate goal was to persuade the people of New York to ratify the constitution.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Teaching American History
Date Added:
06/29/2017
Federalist No. 19 Publius (Madison with Hamilton)
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print

Federalist No. 19 Publius (Madison with Hamilton)

Rating
0.0 stars

This resource provides information on Federalist No. 19. The Federalist Papers were originally newspaper essays written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay under the pseudonym Publius, whose immediate goal was to persuade the people of New York to ratify the constitution.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Teaching American History
Date Added:
06/29/2017
Federalist No. 1 Publius (Alexander Hamilton)
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print

Federalist No. 1 Publius (Alexander Hamilton)

Rating
0.0 stars

This resource provides information on Federalist No. 1. The Federalist Papers were originally newspaper essays written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay under the pseudonym Publius, whose immediate goal was to persuade the people of New York to ratify the constitution.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Teaching American History
Date Added:
06/29/2017
Federalist No. 20 Publius (Madison with Hamilton)
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print

Federalist No. 20 Publius (Madison with Hamilton)

Rating
0.0 stars

This resource provides information on Federalist No. 20. The Federalist Papers were originally newspaper essays written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay under the pseudonym Publius, whose immediate goal was to persuade the people of New York to ratify the constitution.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Teaching American History
Date Added:
06/29/2017
Federalist No. 21 Publius (Alexander Hamilton)
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print

Federalist No. 21 Publius (Alexander Hamilton)

Rating
0.0 stars

This resource provides information on Federalist No. 21. The Federalist Papers were originally newspaper essays written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay under the pseudonym Publius, whose immediate goal was to persuade the people of New York to ratify the constitution.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Teaching American History
Date Added:
06/29/2017