Author:
Melody Casey
Subject:
Arts Education, English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Level:
Middle School
Grade:
7
Tags:
  • GEDB
  • Global Education
    License:
    Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial
    Language:
    English

    Education Standards

    GEDB Take a Walk in My Shoes: Walking in Another's Shoes Through Sculpture (Lesson 3 of 3)

    GEDB Take a Walk in My Shoes: Walking in Another's Shoes Through Sculpture (Lesson 3 of 3)

    Overview

    Students will learn about Nelson Mandela and Apartheid and imagine what it would be like to walk in the shoes of Nelson Mandela. Students will then research a global leader who has gone through adversity and made a positive difference in the world. They will honor the person through researching and creating a clay shoe sculpture using three or more symbols in their sculpture to tell the story of the person and include a quote that speaks to them personally. Students will create a video or presentation to explain their sculpture and tell about their individual. Students will print a code for their sculpture that links to their video. The sculptures will be displayed with the code for the school and community as they are invited to the Art Walk of Shoes. This lesson was developed by Laura Mitchell as part of their completion of the North Carolina Global Educator Digital Badge program. This lesson plan has been vetted at the local and state level for standards alignment, Global Education focus, and content accuracy.            

    Lesson Plan

    Description

    Students will learn about Nelson Mandela and Apartheid and imagine what it would be like to walk in the shoes of Nelson Mandela. Students will then research a global leader who has gone through adversity and made a positive difference in the world. They will honor the person through researching and creating a clay shoe sculpture using three or more symbols in their sculpture to tell the story of the person and include a quote that speaks to them personally. Students will create a video or presentation to explain their sculpture and tell about their individual. Students will print a code for their sculpture that links to their video. The sculptures will be displayed with the code for the school and community as they are invited to the Art Walk of Shoes.


    Content

    Student Engagement/Motivation

    Have students view a Nelson Mandela quote (See attached Mandela Quote PDF).  On a sticky note students will write what they think the quote means.


    Learning Targets and Criteria for Success

    I can include multimedia components in presentations to emphasize points.

    I can use appropriate technology tools to access information.

    I can use appropriate technology tools and other resources to design a presentation.

    I can implement formative and summative evaluations of personal art.

    I can create original art emphasizing selected elements and principles to express ideas.

    I can apply safely knowledge to maintain a safe and orderly personal work space.

    I will create a presentation about my shoe sculpture using multimedia components to emphasize points about the biography and artwork.

    I will use appropriate technology tools to access information while researching for my bibliography.

    I will use appropriate technology tools and other resources to design a presentation about my art.

    I will implement formative and summartive evaluations of my personal art by communicating verbally with my teacher and peers and writing about my art.

    I will create a clay shoe sculpture that emphasizes form, color, and texture to express my idea of how to represent a person's life through a shoe sculpture.

    I will apply safely knowledge of using the slab roller and maintain a orderly personal work space.


    Supplies/Resources

    lowfire white clay (cone 04) approx 1 lb per student, slab roller and/rolling pins, kiln, large paper clips, paper, pencil, slip, 12" x 12" masonite boards for each student, glazes, variety of soft brushes, sink and water to wash brushes, black permanent markers, tablets and/or laptops


    Learning Tasks and Practice

    Day 1:

    Have students watch a biography on the Life of Nelson Mandela:

    http://viewpure.com/UqoYmx_L-Xs?ref=search

    or if students are more captivated by animation:

    http://viewpure.com/2Yto4-Ft9dc?ref=search

    -Using the 6 panel Mandela Storyboard (See attached Mandela Storyboard PDF) students will draw a storyboard of what it would have been like to walk in Nelson Mandela's shoes.  Students may choose to do extra research using their school media center or online resources available to them. Students must draw as well as write events in Mandela's life that were significant.

    -Teacher will project the following image on the board as students work and think about walking in Mandela's shoes.

    https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/ENnY-m3Rqqk3sZ7CF3eEnM0DorclxpmjEMqs2MTVxzlA3MXeJTENEwNiKOdMwz7i4DCjnUUqTyYOe71VfVDo8JhG2dWfPejAGzUaTPEJux42wX7Hbhx_JEPI7FD6gfA4T0LwKoot

    Photo Credit by Author: Laura Mitchell

     

    Day 2:

    -Display Clay Shoe Sculpture Assignment (see attached PDF).

    -Read instructions together for understanding of expectations.  Share student examples of shoe sculptures and point out the three symbols, quote, texture, and form.  https://www.artsonia.com/museum/gallery.asp?project=1223585 The teacher may want to prepare a few examples prior to class if Internet access is unavailable.

    -Each student will pick a name out of the hat that the teacher prepared ahead of time (see List of Famous People PDF attachment).  Student will look up the person on a laptop/tablet/book.  The students can either trade the name with another student once or trade their name for another one out of the hat.  By having names to choose from it will alleviate students choosing athletes and celebrities while at the same time giving them choice by allowing them to switch names.  Students will then begin finding information for the Bibliography Worksheet(see attached JPEG, https://images.template.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/Biography-Report-Form-Education-Possible.jpg) Students may work on laptops or class may research books in media center.

     

    Day 3:

    -Finish the Biography Worksheet and again share student examples of shoe sculptures.  https://www.artsonia.com/museum/gallery.asp?project=1223585

    -Teacher passes out the Clay Shoe Assignment Assessment Sheet (See attached PDF) or posts copies around the room to refer to so that students understand how they will be graded.

     

    Day 4:

    -Teacher displays the Clay Shoe Sculpture Assignment (See attached PDF) so students know what to include in their design.

    -Students begin sketch for clay shoe sculpture including at least three symbols that "tell the story" of their famous person, a quote from the person encorporated into the design, and texture.

     

    Day 5:

    -Students complete sketches and begin building paper templates, if needed.  Many students may want to simply trace their own foot on a piece of paper and cut out the shape to use as a template for the sole of the clay shoe.

    -Teacher walks around room to help and answer questions.

    -Teacher demos how to roll out clay safely using a slab roller and begin sculptures.

    -Teacher demos how to maintain an orderly work space by wiping down the tables after working.

     

    Day 6:

    -Students with completed sketch and biography worksheet receive 1 pound of clay from the teacher.

    -Student roll clay to 1/4 to 1/2 inch thickness using a slab roller or rolling pin.

    -Students work on masonite boards so clay does not stick to table.

    -Students trace templates (if needed) by laying them flat on the clay.

    -Students will use the sharp end of a large paper clip cut out clay shapes.

    -Students will score (scratch both pieces of clay with paper clip) and slip (watered down clay used like glue) the pieces together bending the clay to create a 3D form.

    -Teacher will leave sculptures on boards and cover overnight with plastic sheets to keep clay from drying out.

     

    Day 7:

    -Teacher reviews scoring and slipping the clay.

    -Teacher demos how to create 3 symbols and score (scratch both pieces of clay with paper clip) and add slip (watered down clay used like glue) the symbols to shoe sculpture. For example: a South African flag, jail bars, and white and black hands shaking for Nelson Mandela or a book, a star, and a closet for Anne Frank.

    -Teacher covers clay with plastic.

     

    Day 8:

    -Students continue working with wet clay to create their sculpture.

    -Teacher walks around room to help individual students.

    -Teacher provides paper towels to bunch up and place into clay shoes if the shoes droop or collapse with the weight of the wet clay.

     

    Day 9:

    -Teacher uncovers the plastic from the wet clay when sculptures are complete and waits for clay to become bone dry. (This need to be timed on a weekend or holiday)

    -Students are given a Walking in Another's Shoes Green Screen Script (See attached PDF) to fill out to prepare for video presentation of their shoe sculpture (or live presentation if video capable is not available)

     

    Day 10:

    -Teacher fires clay to Cone 04 in kiln (only if clay is bone dry).

    -Students work on Green Screen script practice and if some finish early free draw (have time to work on personal drawings of their choice)

    -If tablets are available students can take this time to choose a background that relates to their person and shoe sculpture for the background of their video or live presentation.

     

    Day 11:

    -Teacher demos glazing a fired clayshoe by brushing the glaze onto the shoe and leaving the botton unglazed.

    -Students choose glaze colors and begin.

    -Students wash out their brushes.

    -Teacher refires shoe sculptures to Cone 05 in kiln in order for the glaze to melt.

     

    Day 12: Students create a video or presentation using a background image that relates to their global leader.  Students will read their script or memorize it and say it during filming/presenting.

     

    Day 13:

    -Students record or perform themselves reading their Green Screen Script holding their finished shoe sculpture with their selected background.

    -Students create a QR code that links to the video, if possible.

     

    Day 14:

    -Students complete Clay Shoe Sculpture Assessment (PDF Attached) and turn in to be graded.

    -Students present to the class their sculpture and presentation.

    -Students display the shoes in the school and/or community and invite viewers to take a walk in The Art Walk of Shoes(a showcase of the student's work).


    Technological Engagement

    Students will produce a video and code for their shoe sculpture.

    Students will research their famous person using a variety of media sources available.


    Collecting and Documenting Evidence of Learning

    Students will be completing self-assessments, a storyboard, and will be creating a sculpture and/or video presentation that documents evidence of learning.


    Student Self-Reflection and Action Steps

    Students will self-reflect by answering the assessment sheet.  Students will also reflect on their design and knowledge of their famous person by watching their video presentation.


    Feedback/Instructional Adjustments

    Creating the shoe sculpture can be difficult and templates will need to be provided for some students to trace. The clay assignment gives the chance for students to be problem solvers and allows them to take risks, but they may have to start over.  The lesson can be simplifed by creating just a clay slab of the student's foot and then having the student add to the slab three 3D symbols or designing it with different found objects.

    There can be more emphasis placed on Nelson Mandela and even a compare and contrasting with Martin Luther King, Jr. and the American Civil Rights Movement.

    An optional assignment would be to alter used shoes and to create symbols with found objects or paper mache.


    Extended Learning Opportunities

    Students can research shoes of a certain time period and/or culture and create a second shoe sculpture using a variety of materials.

    Students can host a shoe cutting party through the organization www.solehope.org and invite the community to donate used jeans to make shoe parts for Uganda.


    Teacher Reflection of Learning

    The students learn from not only their own research, but the research of each other.  By every student researching a different person it allows students to be exposed to different people from throughout history.