Author:
Melody Casey
Subject:
Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Level:
Middle School
Grade:
7
Tags:
  • #NCDLS
  • GEDB
  • Global Education
  • ncdls
    License:
    Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial
    Language:
    English

    Education Standards

    GEDB Global Warming: Global Warming and Climate Change Impacts on Human Health (Lesson 5 of 5)

    GEDB Global Warming: Global Warming and Climate Change Impacts on Human Health (Lesson 5 of 5)

    Overview

    Students will consider multiple perspectives of other cultures and countries. They will realize that global warming may not be a priority in countries where the basic population is struggling to maintain an existence. Students will understand how difficult it is to insure all countries of the world reduce their contribution to global warming and follow the lead of the United States. Students will create a proposed action plan for how they will act and educate others on the impact on human health of global warming. Students will apply their knowledge and discoveries from this unit to propose how they teach others about the importance of reducing their own carbon footprint. The standards tagged are for the entire series of lessons as a whole. This lesson was developed by Marty Ervin as part of their completion of the North Carolina Global Educator Digital Badge program. This lesson plan has been vetted at the local and state level for standards alignment, Global Education focus, and content accuracy.

    Lesson Plan

    Description

    Students will consider multiple perspectives of other cultures and countries. They will realize that global warming may not be a priority in countries where the basic population is struggling to maintain an existence. Students will understand how difficult it is to insure all countries of the world reduce their contribution to global warming and follow the lead of the United States. Students will create a proposed action plan for how they will act and educate others on the impact on human health of global warming. Students will apply their knowledge and discoveries from this unit to propose how they teach others about the importance of reducing their own carbon footprint.


    Content

    Learning Targets and Criteria for Success

    Students will consider multiple perspectives of other cultures and countries.  They will realize that global warming may not be a priority in countries where the basic population is struggling to maintain an existence.  Students will understand  how difficult it is to insure all countries of the world reduce their contribution to global warming and follow the lead of the United States.  Students will create a proposed action plan for how they will act and educate others on the impact on human health of global warming.  Students will apply their knowledge and discoveries from this unit to propose how they teach others about the importance of reducing their own carbon footprint.


    Learning Tasks and Practice

    Teaching Point:

    Global warming could do more to hurt your health than simply threaten summertime heat stroke.  Although heat-related illnesses and deaths will increase with the temperatures, climate change is expected to also attack human health with dirtier air and water, more flood-related accidents and injuries, threats to food supplies, hundreds of millions of environmental refugees, and stress on and possible collapse of many ecosystems that now purify air and water.

     

    Lesson Procedures:   

    Students will read and briefly review the warmup on Homeostasis.  How would Global Warming change our homeostasis?  Students then read the handout on Actions and Steps We Can Take.  Group Discussion to answer the questions.

     

    Warm up: 

    Homeostasis

    Homeostasis – the ability of your body to maintain internal conditions.  Homeostasis is about staying the same inside no matter what the outside does.   Homeostasis – maintenance of equilibrium within an living organism.    How does drinking water after you sweat help maintain homeostasis?  When you sweat, your body loses water.  Adding new water to your body helps maintain homeostasis.     Examples of Homeostasis in our body: acids and bases in our blood,  body temperature, calcium levels, fluid volume, glucose concentrations.

     

    Independent Activity: Handout on Actions and Steps We Can Take

    ACTIONS WE CAN TAKE TO PREPARE FOR CLIMATE CHANGE

    We can responsibly manage the problems facing our environment by taking sensible steps toward protecting human health and safety. Whether measures are meant to reduce future climate change impacts or address the health impacts of climate change that are happening already, early action provides the greatest health benefits. It makes sense to invest in creating the strongest climate-health adaptation and preparedness programs we can.

    Reducing the release of heat-trapping gases like CO2 can help protect our health and wellbeing by decreasing impacts on our climate system. Activities that reduce the amount of heat-trapping CO2 in the atmosphere are many of the same things we already know prevent health problems. Active modes of transport like biking or walking can help reduce traffic-related air pollution and encourage physical activity, which has public health benefits including reduced rates of obesity, heart disease, and diabetes.

     

    ACTIONS WE CAN TAKE TO PREPARE FOR EXTREME HEAT EVENTS

    We also need to take actions that make our communities less vulnerable to climate change impacts already in progress. Many communities have programs to address climate-sensitive health issues. When it comes to managing the health threats associated with extreme heat, there are approaches that we know work:

    Heat wave early warning systems can protect people by communicating heat wave risks and suggesting protective actions. These warning systems are much less costly than treating and coping with heat illnesses. Heat alerts serve as triggers for cities and counties to take preventive action, like opening cooling centers where the public can gather for relief from the heat. Air-conditioning is the number-one protective factor against extreme heat, which is an essential health resource for vulnerable populations. Staying hydrated and avoiding strenuous outdoor exercise during heat alerts can protect individuals from adverse effects of extreme heat. Providing easy access to public drinking fountains, swimming pools, and spray pads can help keep people cool during periods of extreme heat. Updating building codes and landscaping laws can increase energy efficiency. It also improves the ability of buildings to provide protection against extreme heat events. For example, green roofs (roofs with plant cover) and strategically located shade trees can reduce indoor temperatures and improve buildings’ energy efficiency. Urban forests, including street trees and wooded areas, can mitigate urban heat islands, reducing local air temperatures by up to 9°F.

     

    STEPS TO SAFEGUARD PUBLIC HEALTH

    We also need to take actions that make our communities less vulnerable to climate change impacts already in progress. Many communities have programs to address climate-sensitive health issues. When it comes to managing the public health threats associated with vector-borne diseases, sensible steps include: Avoiding bug bites by using insect repellent or covering exposed skin with long-sleeved shirts, long pants, and hats. Encouraging coordination between federal, state, tribal, and local officials, such as mosquito control program officers, to predict and pinpoint possible hot spots for insect outbreaks, so that the appropriate measures to protect public health can be taken.

     

    ACTIONS WE CAN TAKE TO PREPARE FOR CLIMATE CHANGE’S IMPACT ON AIR QUALITY

    We also need to take action to make our communities less vulnerable to climate change impacts already in progress. Many communities are already addressing climate-sensitive health issues. When it comes to managing the health threats associated with air quality, a variety of effective public health responses are available.  


    Collecting and Documenting Evidence of Learning

    Questions to Answer: 

    How can we educate other countries if they do not have access to the internet?  How can we teach others and what at what age level?  What methods can we use to reduce our carbon footprint?  Thirteen of the world’s largest cities on earth are located at sea level on coasts.  Should these cities be prepared in advance? Why?  Clean water is the most basic and critical health need.  Climate change is threatening this water supply and quality.  How can we reduce our water consumption?  What inventions could we create for third world countries? Drought and famine cause more than half of all deaths worldwide each year. How would climate change impact this percentage?  Should we continue to contribute and spend billions of dollars on space travel?  Earth is our home, and only one we have. 

     

    Closure:

    Making Predictions about the Effects of Global Warming :  

    With an understanding of the greenhouse effect and global climate change, students can now make predictions about the potential impact of global warming.

    1. Ask students to hypothesize about how the world's climate could change over the next 100 years if humans do nothing to limit the levels of their greenhouse gas emissions. Have them also make predictions about the effects such climate changes could have on humans.

    2. Working in pairs, then small groups and finally as a class, students should brainstorm a list of their ideas related to these questions.