Author:
Glenn Shelton, Carrie Robledo
Subject:
Mathematics, Science, STEM
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Level:
Lower Primary
Grade:
2
Tags:
  • #NCDLS
  • 2nd Grade
  • 2nd-grade
  • K-5 Design Thinking
  • STEM
  • data
  • engineering
  • k-5-design-thinking
  • k5engineers
  • math
  • measurement
  • ncdls
  • stem
    License:
    Creative Commons Attribution
    Language:
    English

    Education Standards

    2: Solar Oven Engineering

    2:  Solar Oven Engineering

    Overview

    Students can work individually or in groups of 3 or 4 to create a solar oven out of a pizza box. Students are trying to figure out the best way to make a solar oven in order to melt the chocolate and marshmallow in the S’more. Students will be given a group of objects and tell them the basis of how to create a solar oven. The oven will need to be placed in direct sunlight for most of the day. This experiment works best on a very hot, sunny day.

    Instructor Directions

    Engineering Process

    2:  Solar Oven Engineering

    Driving Question / ScenarioHow can you use the sun’s energy to make S’mores?
    Project SummaryStudents can work individually or in groups of 3 or 4 to create a solar oven out of a pizza box. Students are trying to figure out the best way to make a solar oven in order to melt the chocolate and marshmallow in the S’more. Students will be given a group of objects and tell them the basis of how to create a solar oven. The oven will need to be placed in direct sunlight for most of the day. This experiment works best on a very hot, sunny day.
    Estimated Time2 Hours (2 days)
    Materials / ResourcesThermometer Timers Cardboard box Aluminum pans /Pizza boxesAluminum foil Black construction paper One piece of Plexiglas large enough to cover the box Sunshine OR gooseneck lamp with 100-Watt bulb S ‘mores fixings (graham crackers, marshmallows, and chocolate) Oven mitts
    Standards2.E.1.1:  Summarize how energy from the sun serves as a source of light that warms the land, air and water.2.MD.7:  Tell and write time from analog and digital clocks to the nearest five minutes, using a.m. and p.m
    Project Outline
    AskWhat is the best solar oven you can create in order to have the best S’more possible?
    ImagineImagine you are living on the moon.  You are CRAVING S’mores! There are no microwaves or fires. The only way of heating anything up is by the sun. You will need to make the best solar oven in order to melt your chocolate and marshmallows in your S’mores.
    PlanTell the students what kind of materials will be provided, and then have them write out and draw their design for their solar oven.
    CreateHand out the materials to the students and challenge them to build their own solar ovens using the plan they created the day before. Have students follow the directions on the experiment and record worksheet to complete their experiment. Once the oven is built, students should place a S ‘more and the thermometer in the box and close the Plexiglas lid.  Have students place the box in direct sunlight. This experiment should be done in the morning so you can leave a few hours to let the sun melt the chocolate and marshmallow.
    ImproveBring the ovens back into the classroom and allow students to look at their S’mores. Discuss the following items with the class: Whose oven got to the highest temperature? Whose oven melted the marshmallows and the chocolate? What could you have done to make your solar oven work better? Does it make a difference to use actual sunlight compared to light from a lamp? Why or why not? What else could you cook using a solar oven? Students can write a summary based on their observations.
    Closure / Student ReflectionsConsider doing one of the following: Have students post pictures to an online portfolio/website, such as Seesaw, for parents to see their resultBloggingTwitter Connect with another class that is completing the same projectFeature the event on a school broadcast have different kinds of engineers come in and talk to the class or Skype with the class about their job of building and using the right materials.
    Possible Modifications / ExtensionsMath - Students can check their solar oven every 15 minutes so that they practice telling time to the nearest ¼ hour. Math - Students can record the time and temperature every 5 or 15 minutes and make a bar graph of the time it took to melt the s’more. Graph results. Students can melt ice cubes instead of S’mores. The class could have a race to see which solar oven can melt their ice cube the fastest. Students could record their times and graph the results. Students can write an informational piece that describes how to make a S’more. Have different kinds of engineers come in and talk to the class or Skype with the class about their job of building and using the right materials.

     

    Sample Pictures / Video

     

    Creative Commons