Author:
DAWNE COKER
Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab, Lesson, Lesson Plan
Level:
Lower Primary
Tags:
  • 2-digit
  • 3-digit
  • Base
  • Center
  • Cl4Lesson
  • Cluster 4
  • Compare
  • Digit
  • Equal
  • Game
  • Greater Than
  • Less
  • Numbers
  • Place Value
  • Represent
  • Spin
  • Spinner
  • Station
  • Ten
  • Than
  • Three
  • Two
  • Unit 4
  • License:
    Creative Commons Attribution
    Language:
    English
    Media Formats:
    Downloadable docs

    Education Standards

    T4T Spin to Win

    T4T Spin to Win

    Overview

    This resource is from Tools4NCTeachers.

    In this lesson, students play a game that requires the comparing and adding of numbers.  The game also provides an opportunity requires record numbers in both standard and expanded form. 

    Remix this lesson to provide extension activities or pictures of student work.

    Click the attachment to download the entire, fully-formatted lesson and support materials.

    In this lesson, students play a game that requires the comparing and adding of numbers.  The game also provides an opportunity requires record numbers in both standard and expanded form. 

    Text Box: In this lesson, students play a game that requires the comparing and adding of numbers.  The game also provides an opportunity requires record numbers in both standard and expanded form.  Spin to Win

     

     

    Common Core Standard:

    Understand place value.

    NC.2.NBT.4 Compare two three-digit numbers based on meanings of the hundreds, tens, and ones digits, using >, =, and < symbols to record the results of comparisons.

     

    Additional/Supporting Standard:

    Understand place value.

    NC.2.NBT.1  Understand that the three digits of a three-digit number represent amounts of hundreds, tens, and ones; e.g., 706 equals 7 hundreds, 0 tens, and 6 ones. Understand the following as special cases:

    1. 100 can be thought of as a bundle of ten tens – called a “hundred.”
    2. The numbers 100, 200, 300, 400, 500, 600, 700, 800, 900 refer to one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine hundreds (and 0 tens and 0 ones).

     

    Standards for Mathematical Practice:

    1.   Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.

    2.   Reason abstractly and quantitatively.

    4.   Model with mathematics.

    5.   Use appropriate tools strategically.

    6.   Attend to precision.

    7.   Look for and make use of structure.

     

    Student Outcomes:

    • I can build numbers with base ten blocks (or other materials).
    • I can figure out which number is bigger (or smaller).
    • I can read and write numbers using expanded form.
    • I can explain how to determine whether a two or three-digit number is greater than, less than, or equal to another two or three-digit number.
    • I can compare two and three-digit numbers and record this comparison by using the symbols >, <, and =.

     

    Materials:

    • Recording sheet for each student
    • Spin to Win spinner for each pair of students
    • Base Ten blocks
    • Clear spinners or students can use a pencil with a paper clip to make a spinner

     


    Advance Preparation:

    • Before playing this game
      • Students should build 2 and then 3-digit numbers using a variety of place value materials such as base ten blocks, Unifix cubes or any other place value material.
      • Students should have used the >, < , = signs to record the comparison of two numbers.
    • Duplicate the Spin to Win spinners for each pair of students.
    • Duplicate a recording sheet for each student.

     

    Directions:

    • Before introducing the game have students build numbers with base ten blocks.  For example, the teacher tells them to build 45.  After sharing the model for 45 the teacher has students build additional numbers. 
    • The teacher introduces the game, Spin to Win.  The game can be introduced to the whole class or to small groups.
    • First, spin the More/Less spinner to determine if the winning strategy for this game is to have more or less than your partner.  Circle more or less on the recording sheet.
    • Next Player 1 spins a number spinner.  The teacher can spin or have a student spin.  After the spin, decide if this spin is for 100s, 10s, or 1s.  Take that many base ten pieces and place them in front of you. After the spin discuss how to determine if the spin should be 100s, 10s, or 1s.  Talk about how larger numbers should be used for the 100s if you are trying to get the largest number possible.  The larger numbers should be used for 10s or 1s if you are trying to get the smallest number possible.
    • Record your amount in the correct place on the recording sheet.  Continue to demonstrate recording the amount.  It is important to have students share ideas about why a number should be 100s, 10s, or 1s.
    • Spin for the second player and take the base ten pieces, record that amount on the recording sheet for Player 2.
    • Continue taking turns until each person has had 3 turns.  Once a number is placed you may not change that number or use that place again.
    • After both players have taken three spins, total the amount and write it in standard and expanded form.  If the terms standard and expanded form have not been introduced to the class, explain these terms.  Determine as a class how to record the amounts in standard and expanded forms.
    • Record your total on the recording sheet.
    • Record the comparison of the two numbers with the <, >, = symbols.
    • Circle the winning score.  Discuss how to determine the winning score.
    • Play several games as a whole class.  The discussion of why numbers spun should be 100s, 10s, or 1s is critical to developing student understanding.
    • The teacher may play this game for 2-3 class sessions with the whole class before having partners play the game independently.  It is important that the teacher and students justify why numbers are chosen to be 100s, 10s, or 1s. 

     


    Questions to Pose:

    • Why did you decide to make this number 100s (or 10s or 1s)?
    • If you are trying to get the smallest number and you spin a 2 should you place that number in the 100s or 1s place?  Why?
    • If I spin a 5, 8 and 1 what is the largest (smallest) number I could make?  How did you decide on your answer?
    • How do you write (say a number) in expanded form?  How do you write it in standard form?
    • If you played the round again, would you change your choices?  Why?
    • How do you know that you won/lost?
    • So far we have 5 tens and 4 ones (tell whatever number has been built).  We want to spin the largest (or smallest number). Talk with your neighbor about what number would be great to spin and why.  After students have talked with a partner have student share what number they are hoping to spin and why.

     

    Possible Misconceptions/Suggestions:

    Possible Misconceptions

    Suggestions

    Students cannot build 3-digit numbers with place value materials.

    Have students build 2-digit numbers with place value materials.  After students are successful with building the numbers, play Spin to Win with 10s and 1s only.

    Students do not understand that when you spin a large number you should place it in the 100s place (if the goal is making the largest number possible.)

    Have students spin the spinner and take that many 100s, and 10s and 1s.  For example, if you spin a 5 take five 100s, five 10s and five 1s.  Discuss which is the largest amount.  Do this for several spins.

     

    Students do not understand that when you spin a large number you should place it in the 100s place (if the goal is making the largest number possible.

    Tell students that you spun an 8 and you want to make the largest (or smallest) number.  Discuss if we should make it 8 100s, 8 10s or 8 1s.  Have the student make each number with place value materials.  Discuss which made the largest (or smallest) amount. 

    Students do not understand the value of each digit.

    Have students build two digit numbers with place value materials.  Talk about what each digit represents.

     

    Special Notes:

     

    Solutions:

    Student papers will vary.

     

     

     

    Spin to Win                                        Player 1________            Player 2________

    Game 1               more  or  less

    100s

     

     

    10s

    1s

    Player 1

    Standard Form:  _______________

    Expanded Form:

    _____________________________________

     

    100s

    10s

    1s

    Player 2

    Standard Form:  _______________

    Expanded Form:

    _____________________________________

     

    Use <, > or = to compare you number and your partner’s number: __________________________________________________

     

    Game 2               more  or  less

    100s

     

     

    10s

    1s

    Player 1

    Standard Form:  _______________

    Expanded Form:

    _____________________________________

     

    100s

    10s

    1s

    Player 2

    Standard Form:  _______________

    Expanded Form:

    ____________________________________

     

    Use <, > or = to compare you number and your partner’s number: __________________________________________________

     

    Spin to Win             

     

     

     

     
     spinner

    Less

    More


    Spin to Win – example of recording a game

     

     

     

    Materials:             Spin to Win spinner                Base Ten pieces                   Recording Sheet

    Rules:

    1. First, spin the More/Less spinner to determine if the winning strategy for this game is to have more or less than your partner.  Circle this on the recording sheet.
    2. Next each person spins a number spinner.  Take turns spinning.  After you spin, you decide if your spin is for 100s, 10s, or 1s.  Take that many base ten pieces and place them in front of you
    3. Record your amount in the correct place on the recording sheet.  After your partner spins and takes his/her base ten pieces, record that amount on your recording sheet.  You have a place to record your amount and a different to record your partner’s amount.
    4. Continue taking turns until each person has had 3 turns.  Once you have placed a number in a place you may not change that number or use that place again.
    5. After you have both taken three spins, total your amount and write it in standard and expanded form.
    6. Record your total on the recording sheet.  Also compare your number and record them using the <, > or = symbols.
    7. Circle the winning score.

     

    Game 1               more  or  less

    100s

    100_flat 100_flat 

    10s

    10s  10s  10s  10s

    1s

    1s copy 1s copy 1s copy 1s copy

    Player 1

    Standard From:    244

     

    Expanded Form

    200 + 40 + 4 = 244

     

    100s

    100_flat 100_flat 100_flat

    10s

    10s  10s  10s  10s  10s  10s  10s  10s

    1s

    1s copy 1s copy 

    Player 2

    Standard From:  382

     

    Expanded Form

     

     

    300 + 80 + 2 = 382

    Use <, > or = to compare you number and your partner’s number: 244 < 382