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9-12 World History:   3D Printing or Merge Cube Hologram Creations
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Overview:

 Students will create an artifact using Tinkercad and a 3D printer.  The artifact must be a product that distinctly relates to their subject.                orStudents will create a holographic presentation using Cospace and Merge Cube.  The hologram will be representative of something distinct to their subject matter.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
William Allred
Carrie Robledo
Date Added:
05/06/2021
9-12 World History Presentation
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Students will create a digital presentation of their topic.  Areas highlighted will be Human-Environment Interaction, Politics, Economics, Culture (to include Religion) and Technology.  Students will also discuss the important points of the previously created timeline. 

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
William Allred
Carrie Robledo
Date Added:
05/06/2021
English Language Arts, Grade 11
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
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Overview:

The 11th grade learning experience consists of 7 mostly month-long units aligned to the Common Core State Standards, with available course material for teachers and students easily accessible online. Over the course of the year there is a steady progression in text complexity levels, sophistication of writing tasks, speaking and listening activities, and increased opportunities for independent and collaborative work. Rubrics and student models accompany many writing assignments.Throughout the 11th grade year, in addition to the Common Read texts that the whole class reads together, students each select an Independent Reading book and engage with peers in group Book Talks. Students move from learning the class rituals and routines and genre features of argument writing in Unit 11.1 to learning about narrative and informational genres in Unit 11.2: The American Short Story. Teacher resources provide additional materials to support each unit.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
11/02/2020
English Language Arts, Grade 11, Revolution
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Overview:

People often say that mankind should learn from history. Charles Dickens, whose books are considered classics, set his novel A Tale of Two Cities in the past. He wanted his readers to learn from the bloody French Revolution and from the widespread brutality in London. Both cities (Paris and London) offer the reader a glimpse into dark and dangerous times. As students read about Dickens's Victorian setting and learn his view of the French Revolution, they will think about what makes a just world. Students will have a chance to think about their own experiences, and, using techniques they have learned from Charles Dickens, they will do some writing that sends a message about your own world.

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

To complete the unit accomplishments, students will:

Read the Charles Dickens novel A Tale of Two Cities.
Read several short pieces, including a biography of Dickens and excerpts from other literature, to help them understand Dickens’s world and the world of the novel.
Explore new vocabulary to build their ability to write and speak using academic language.
Practice close reading and participate in several role plays and dramatic readings to help them experience the dramatic writing style of Charles Dickens.
Write a vignette and a short narrative piece, and practice using descriptive detail and precise language.
Write a reflection about the meaning of Dickens’s novel.

GUIDING QUESTIONS

These questions are a guide to stimulate thinking, discussion, and writing on the themes and ideas in the unit. For complete and thoughtful answers and for meaningful discussions, students must use evidence based on careful reading of the texts.

How does good storytelling affect the reader, and how can a good story promote change in the world?
What was the Victorian view of gender roles?
How can power be abused?
What is loyalty ? What are the limits of loyalty?

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Provider:
Pearson
English Language Arts, Grade 11, Revolution, Dickens as Storyteller, Dickens’s Biography
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CC BY-NC
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Overview:

In this lesson, you will review Dickens’s biography and his concerns as a writer, and you will begin to read and annotate A Tale of Two Cities.In this lesson, students will review Dickens’s biography and his concerns as a writer, and they will begin to read and annotate A Tale of Two Cities.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Pearson
Date Added:
11/02/2020
English Language Arts, Grade 11, Revolution, Revolutionary Writing, Old Bailey Courtroom
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CC BY-NC
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Overview:

In this lesson, you will become part of the Old Bailey courtroom and think about Dickens’s opinion of this British court.In this lesson, students will become part of the Old Bailey courtroom and think about Dickens’s opinion of this British court.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Pearson
Date Added:
11/02/2020
English Language Arts, Grade 12
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
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Overview:

The 12th grade learning experience consists of 7 mostly month-long units aligned to the Common Core State Standards, with available course material for teachers and students easily accessible online. Over the course of the year there is a steady progression in text complexity levels, sophistication of writing tasks, speaking and listening activities, and increased opportunities for independent and collaborative work. Rubrics and student models accompany many writing assignments.Throughout the 12th grade year, in addition to the Common Read texts that the whole class reads together, students each select an Independent Reading book and engage with peers in group Book Talks. Language study is embedded in every 12th grade unit as students use annotation to closely review aspects of each text. Teacher resources provide additional materials to support each unit.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
11/02/2020
English Language Arts, Grade 12, Satire and Wit
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Overview:

Students will consider the different ways that humor can be used by a writer to criticize people, practices, and institutions that he or she thinks are in need of serious reform. Students will read satirists ranging from classical Rome to modern day to examine how wit can be used to make important points about culture.

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Students research an aspect of modern life that they would like to lampoon.
Students read from satirists across history to absorb the style and forms of humor and institutions satirized.
Students write their own satire, drawing on techniques of famous satirists to criticize their targets.

GUIDING QUESTIONS

These questions are a guide to stimulate thinking, discussion, and writing on the themes and ideas in the unit. For complete and thoughtful answers and for meaningful discussions, students must use evidence based on careful reading of the texts.

What is satire, and when is it too harsh?
How can humor and irony make you more persuasive?
What do you think is funny? How far would you go to satirize it?
Who gets more reaction—satirists or protestors?

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Provider:
Pearson
English Language Arts, Grade 12, Satire and Wit, Common Targets of Satire, An Age-Old Target Of Satire
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CC BY-NC
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Overview:

In this lesson, students will continue to enjoy examining an age-old target of satire. Students also start to plan a class presentation.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Pearson
Date Added:
11/02/2020
Presidential Portraits
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CC BY
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The nation’s only complete collection of presidential portraits outside the White House, the America’s Presidents exhibition lies at the heart of the National Portrait Gallery’s mission to tell the American story through the individuals who have shaped it; these models are a selection of Presidential sculptures from the exhibit.

The Smithsonian 3D Program is a small group of technologists working within the Smithsonian Institution's Digitization Program Office. We focus on developing solutions to further the Smithsonian's mission of “the increase and diffusion of knowledge” through the use of three-dimensional scanning technology, analysis tools, and our distribution platform.

This work is already transforming core functions of our museums. Researchers in the field can now come back not only with specimens, but also 3D data documenting entire sites. Curators and educators are using 3D data as the basis for telling stories and sending students on quests of discovery. Conservators are using 3D data to track the condition of a collection item over time using 3D deviation analysis tools, showing exactly what changes have occurred to an object.

Subject:
Visual Arts
American History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Reference Material
Provider:
Smithsonian Institution
Author:
The Smithsonian Institution
Date Added:
07/03/2020
United States Studies, Chapter 3: How Does the United States Government Work For You?
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Overview:

You have learned that there are different areas of social studies and different kinds of social scientists. You learned that geographers study geography and economists study economics. This chapter is about civics, another important area of social studies. Civics is the study of government and the role people play in government. But who studies civics??? Civicsers? Civicsists? It’s a little more complicated this time. Political scientists study civics! Politics is just another name for government. But wait, what is government? Government is a system that people use to provide order and make decisions. It is also a system for distributing power like the power to make laws and the power to enforce laws. It is also a system for regulating the conduct of people, or how people
behave.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
MIOpenBook
Provider Set:
Michigan Open Book Project
Author:
Ann Passino
Jennifer Fairweather
Mark Estelle
Maureen Klein
Nancy Bucholtz
Susan Welch
Date Added:
07/22/2019