Author:
Carrie Robledo, Scarlett Chapman
Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Level:
Lower Primary
Tags:
  • 1st Grade
  • 2nd Grade
  • Math
  • NCEngineers
  • Numbers and Base Ten
  • k5engineers
    License:
    Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike
    Language:
    English

    Education Standards

    Popcorn Box Engineering

    Popcorn Box Engineering

    Overview

    Students work in teams to follow criteria and constraints to design their own container that holds pompoms (popcorn). When this is completed they need to test and record how many pom-poms their container will hold. Students find that counting and organizing groups of ten is the best way to do this. They record their information on a data analysis sheet and the following day they compare their numbers and amounts.

    Instructor Directions

     

     

    Popcorn Box Engineering

    Submitted by Scarlett Chapman

    Orange County Schools

     

     

    Driving Question / ScenarioThere is a movie theater in town that is selling popcorn to customers who come to see their movies. The problem is that customers have to bring their own containers, but there is no limit on what size container you can bring.. How can we make a container that will hold the amount of popcorn that we want to eat while watching a movie?
    Project SummaryStudents work in teams to follow criteria and constraints to design their own container that holds pompoms (popcorn). When this is completed they need to test and record how many pom-poms their container will hold. Students find that counting and organizing groups of ten is the best way to do this. They record their information on a data analysis sheet and the following day they compare their numbers and amounts.
    Estimated Time3  45 min lessons
    Materials / ResourcesApprox. 500-1000 pom-poms, 4 sheets of construction paper per student group,  tape , stickers and markers, pencils, and data sheet.
    Grade1st or 2nd
    Subject(s)Engineering and Math
    Educational StandardsStandards for Mathematical Practice: 1. Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them. 2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively. 3. Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others. 4. Model with mathematics. 5. Use appropriate tools strategically. 6. Attend to precision. 7. Look for and make use of structure. 8. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.1st Grade-Extend and recognize patterns in the counting sequence. NC.1.NBT.1 Count to 150, starting at any number less than 150. NC.1.NBT.7 Read and write numerals, and represent a number of objects with a written numeral, to 100. Understand place value. NC.1.NBT.2 Understand that the two digits of a two-digit number represent amounts of tens and ones. • Unitize by making a ten from a collection of ten ones. • Model the numbers from 11 to 19 as composed of a ten and one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine ones. • Demonstrate that the numbers 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 refer to one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine tens, with 0 ones. NC.1.NBT.3 Compare two two-digit numbers based on the value of the tens and ones digits, recording the results of comparisons with the symbols >, =, and <. Use place value understanding and properties of operations. NC.1.NBT.4 Using concrete models or drawings, strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and explaining the reasoning used, add, within 100, in the following situations: • A two-digit number and a one-digit number • A two-digit number and a multiple of 10 NC.1.NBT.5 Given a two-digit number, mentally find 10 more or 10 less than the number, without having to count; explain the reasoning used. 2nd Grade-Understand place value. NC.2.NBT.1 Understand that the three digits of a three-digit number represent amounts of hundreds, tens, and ones. • Unitize by making a hundred from a collection of ten tens. • Demonstrate that the numbers 100, 200, 300, 400, 500, 600, 700, 800, 900 refer to one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine hundreds, with 0 tens and 0 ones. • Compose and decompose numbers using various groupings of hundreds, tens, and ones. NC.2.NBT.2 Count within 1,000; skip-count by 5s, 10s, and 100s. NC.2.NBT.3 Read and write numbers, within 1,000, using base-ten numerals, number names, and expanded form. NC.2.NBT.4 Compare two three-digit numbers based on the value of the hundreds, tens, and ones digits, using >, =, and < symbols to record the results of comparisons.
    Classifying ObjectiveStudents will work in teams of 2 students each to create a popcorn box following specific constraints and criteria. Next they will test their box by filling it with pom-poms. They will then do data analysis to count, group, and add their pom-poms, finding out how much popcorn their box can hold. Students will record their findings using equations, and diagrams. Last they will compare their data to another group. Students will use the greater than/ less than signs to explain their findings.
    Project Outline
    AskHow can we create a box out of 4 half sheets of paper, not using scissors, and with only 2 feet of tape?Also, prep your students with these follow-up questions as they work through the process:How much popcorn do we want our  box to hold?How should we efficiently count it?How do I share this job with my partner?How do I communicate my ideas positively and without arguing?
    ImagineYou will work with a partner to build a container to hold popcorn, then compare which container holds the most. We will have to record data in order to complete this project!Criteria : Containers can be any size, but must hold 2 cups of popcorn and stay together when filed. Your box also must be made of paper products so they can be thrown away after use. Constraints: students can use up to 4 sheets of construction paper, and 2 feet of tape. Students can tear the paper to alter it, but cannot use scissors. They have 30 minutes for the task. Although you may want to allow for longer if needed.
    PlanUsing the handout, draw a diagram of your popcorn box to show how big, and wide we want our box to be. Show where you will use the tape to connect the sides. Look at and manipulate the materials so that we can understand how this might work.Students work in pairs, they are going to have some difficulty at first because they will want to build their own individual box. Encourage communication and sharing thoughts and ideas until they find a compromise.
    CreateStudents work on their agreed plan, using construction paper, tape, to create their box.
    ImproveAfter the containers are made, students test them to see if they hold a minimum of 2 cups of popcorn (pom-poms) and if they stay together when filled. If not, they need to go back and make adjustments.
    Closure / Student ReflectionsNext we have to count to see how many pom-poms each held and record amounts using the data analysis page. We need to defend our thinking so we can show how we counted our pom-poms with equations. Later that day or the next day we compare quantities using comparative language and greater than and less than symbols to defend our thinking.*I did not use Kahoot, however it would be a great way to use the student's self-assessment of their learning and communication with their partner.  
    Possible Modifications / ExtensionsIf you have a student who has trouble with emotional regulation, it is fine to let them create their own box, and not have a partner for this activity. I have found that if you force the partner idea on a student who struggles more than most to share etc, it will impact the teacher’s ability to help everyone and add undue stress to the creating process. This project is written for 6-7 year old students. It can also be used for older EC students who have learning disabilities. In every case, this project provides valuable hands on practice with manipulating materials, counting, grouping, and comparing. The technology that we use works best to record and show our results to others. If using SeeSaw there is a recording button that will aid in the explanation of how they counted and use of comparison language if students have difficulty writing.The data sheet can be uploaded to SeeSaw or PearDeck.It is important to understand that the amount of paper that is allowed will directly impact the volume  and size of the box that students create. You may consider altering the size of the paper (halves) when working with younger students or with students who need to work within 100.