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  • NC.ELA.W.1.1.b - With guidance and support from adults, focus on a topic, respond to qu...
1st Grade ELA Parent Guide
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This parent guide supports parents in helping their child at home with 1st Grade ELA content. Within the folder you will access Parent Guide PDFs in FIVE Languages: Arabic, English, Hindi, Spanish, and Vietnamese to help on-going communication with caregivers. 

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Curriculum
Reference Material
Vocabulary
Author:
Rachel Wright Junio
Date Added:
04/25/2023
1st Grade ELA Teacher Guides (Units 1-6)
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These resources accompany our Rethink 1st Grade ELA course. They include ideas for use, ways to support exceptional children, ways to extend learning, digital resources and tools, tips for supporting English Language Learners and students with visual and hearing impairments. There are also ideas for offline learning. 

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Curriculum
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Kelly Rawlston
Date Added:
08/18/2023
1st Grade ELA- Unit #4: Writing
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This unit was created by the Rethink Education Content Development Team. This course is aligned to the NC Standards for 1st Grade ELA in Writing.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Formative Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Presentation
Unit of Study
Vocabulary
Author:
Kelly Rawlston
Date Added:
02/15/2023
Acrostic Poems: All About Me and My Favorite Things
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In this lesson, students will write free-verse acrostic poems about themselves using the letters of their names to begin each line. They then write an additional acrostic poem about something that is important to them. After proofreading, both poems are recopied or typed and illustrated and then mounted on construction paper for display. Several opportunities for sharing and peer review are incorporated.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
LEARN NC
Author:
Renee Goularte
Date Added:
02/26/2019
As Slippery as an Eel: An Ocean Unit Exploring Simile and Metaphor
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Students are prompted to use comparisons to discuss what they see as they picture walk through books about the ocean. They identify what these comparisons have in common to arrive at an informal name and definition of simile. They then create illustrations showing these comparisons. Next, students picture walk through two additional picture books about the ocean and comment about what they see. They are introduced to metaphor by rewording some of their comments into metaphors. They continue to note metaphors as the books are read aloud, and then name and define this new type of comparison. They again draw pictures to illustrate some of these metaphors. Students discuss why writers use these types of comparisons, then work to revise existing writing to incorporate figurative language through guided practice or independent work. Finally, students use templates to create a book on the ocean that features similes and metaphors.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
ReadWriteThink
Author:
Carolyn Wilhelm
Date Added:
02/26/2019
Awareness of Alliteration: Enhancing Writing Through Mentor Texts
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In this lesson, students will use mentor texts and will construct a definition of alliteration. Using these texts as models, students experiment with creating alliterative sentences.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
ReadWriteThink
Author:
Jennifer Neff, Master of Science in Education
Date Added:
02/26/2019
Choosing One Word: Summarizing Shel Silverstein’s “Sick”
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In this lesson, students will read Shel Silverstein's "Sick" aloud, students summarize the poem and count the words in their summary. They then summarize the poem again, using only one word. Students explain their choices and discuss the various words offered as a summary. The class then chooses the one word that best represents what is happening in the poem. Finally, students read a second poem, individually or in small groups, and summarize it using only one word.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
ReadWriteThink
Author:
Lisa Storm Fink
Date Added:
02/26/2019
Collaborating on a Class Book: Exploring Before-During-After Sequences
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Students and the teacher produce a class book through a group-writing activity, focusing on a basic before-during-after sequence of events. After discussing what they know about pumpkins, the class carves a jack-o-lantern, pausing at each step to chart their observations on before, during, and after charts. The class then uses their sentences from the chart to write the sequence of events for carving the pumpkin. Finally, the class publishes their work, using one of several publishing options.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
ReadWriteThink
Author:
Judy Annan
Date Added:
02/26/2019
Collaborative Stories 1: Prewriting and Drafting
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In this lesson, students complete two prewriting activities, one on brainstorming ideas using story maps, and one on creating beginnings of stories. They then work on two collaborative-writing activities in which they draft an "oversized" story on chart paper. Each student works individually to read what has been written before, adds the "next sentence," and passes the developing story on to another student. The story is passed from student to student until the story is complete. In a later lesson Collaborative Stories 2: Revising, the story is revised by the groups.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
ReadWriteThink
Author:
Renee Goularte
Date Added:
02/26/2019
Collaborative Stories 2: Revising
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In this lesson, using a story which has been written collaboratively, students engage in a whole-group revising process by having each student add a sentence at a time. The teacher leads this shared-revising activity to help students consider story content. Students begin by reading their collaborative story and then discuss ways of making changes. Then, after revisions have been made, they reread the story as a group. Finally, students come to a consensus on a title for their story.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
ReadWriteThink
Author:
Renee Goularte
Date Added:
02/26/2019
Comparing Fiction and Nonfiction with "Little Red Riding Hood Text" Sets
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This lesson plan features an example of a cumulative literary experience or “literature unit” structured around a text set made up of conceptually-related fiction and nonfiction for reading aloud and for independent reading.

Beginning with a comparative study of selected, illustrated retellings of the traditional folktale “Little Red Riding Hood,” including versions from several different cultures, this literature unit continues with a study of modern revisions of this well-known tale. After students have an opportunity to explore similarities and differences among the retellings and revisions, they are introduced to fiction and nonfiction texts featuring wolves in order to provide them with a different perspective of the “villain” in the "Little Red Riding Hood" tales. The unit culminates in a class-written version of the folktale.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
International Reading Association/National Council of Teachers of English/ReadWriteThink
Author:
Joy F. Moss
Date Added:
02/26/2019
Completing the Circle: The Craft of Circular Plot Structure
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"Reading like writers," students will explore the ways that stories are structured; then, "writing like writers," students explore organizational structures in their own writing. Students listen to a reading of Long Night Moon, a circular story. Nexzt, they develop their own examples of circular stories which they share out with their peers.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
ReadWriteThink
Author:
Carolyn Wilhelm
Date Added:
02/26/2019
Creating Question and Answer Books through Guided Research
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In this lesson, students will use KWL charts and interactive writing as key components of organizing information. As a class, students list what they know about insects, prompted by examining pictures in an insect book. Students them pose questions they have about insects, again using picture books as a visual prompt. Students then search for answers to the questions they have posed, using Websites, read-alouds, and easy readers. Periodic reviews of gathered information become the backdrop to ongoing inquiry, discussion, reporting, and confirming information. The lesson culminates with the publishing of a collaborative question and answer book which reports on information about the chosen topic, with each student contributing one page to the book.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
ReadWriteThink
Author:
Renee Goularte
Date Added:
02/26/2019
Descriptive Writing and the 100th Day of School
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This lesson guides students in writing descriptions of 100th day bottles they create at home. Students will write clues about their bottles for a guessing game, practice descriptive writing, and create a class book. Several pieces of literature appropriate for use with this lesson are suggested.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
International Literacy Association
Author:
Melissa Weimer
Date Added:
02/26/2019
Family Message Journals Teach Many Purposes for Writing
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In this lesson, students first write a message to their families explaining what they have learned about a topic. Next, they write a message comparing what they know to new information that they are just learning. Finally, they write a message saying how they feel about something they encountered in class, such as a favorite character in a book.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
ReadWriteThink
Author:
Julie Wollman
Date Added:
02/26/2019
From Fact to Fiction: Drawing and Writing Stories
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Getting children to use their imaginations when writing a story can sometimes be difficult. Drawing, however, can create a bridge between the ideas in a child's head and the blank piece of paper on the desk. In this lesson, students use factual information gathered from the Internet as the basis for creating a nonfiction story. Story elements, including setting, characters, problem, solution, and endings, are then used as a structure for assembling students' ideas into a fiction story.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
ReadWriteThink
Author:
Betty Welch
Date Added:
02/26/2019
GEDB Oh the Feet You'll Meet-Shoes: Goods and Services (Lesson 3 of 5)
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This lesson will help students to communicate ideas. It will review the concepts of needs and wants and introduce goods and services. The shoe collection associated with this unit was introduced in lesson 2 and the preparations for it continues in this lesson. The students will use various methods to communicate ideas about the shoe collection to the school, families, and community, and will begin to take action in implementing the steps of a successful shoe collection. Students will also take action by helping put shoes that have been collected around the halls of the building.This lesson was developed by James Agner as part of their completion of the North Carolina Global Educator Digital Badge program. This lesson plan has been vetted at the local and state level for standards alignment, Global Education focus, and content accuracy.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Melody Casey
Date Added:
10/24/2019
Integrating Language Arts: If You Give a Mouse a Cookie
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In this lesson, students will read Laura Joffe Numeroff's 'If You Give a Mouse a Cookie' to combine word-skill work with prediction and sequencing practice. Students learn about cause-effect relationships during a shared reading of the book and then complete a cloze exercise that uses context and initial consonant clues. Students then create story circles that display the events of the story and use these circles to retell the story to a peer. Finally, the students compose their own stories featuring themselves in the role of the mouse.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
ReadWriteThink
Author:
Lisa Bass
Date Added:
02/26/2019