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3.RI.6 Graphic Organizer
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 This graphic organizer can be used with any informational text to determine the author’s point of view.  Students will use this graphic organizer to determine the topic of a text, the author’s point of view of a text, provide supporting details, and state their own opinion of a text.  This could be used with a tech tool where students can draw or type directly on the document (Nearpod, Peardeck, Seesaw, Etc.)

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Assessment
Author:
Janice Stowell
Date Added:
07/10/2020
Bibliotherapy: Helping Students, One Book at a Time
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CC BY-SA
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This article provides an overview of how teachers can use bibliotherapy to help students deal with social, emotional, and behavioral issues.

Subject:
Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Ohio State University College of Education and Human Ecology
Provider Set:
Beyond Penguins and Polar Bears: An Online Magazine for K-5 Teachers
Author:
Jessica Fries-Gaither
Date Added:
07/30/2019
A Digital Small-Group Discussion-Recording Tool (with supporting math discovery slideshow)
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CC BY
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Google Sheets platform for small groups of students to record/share their discussions as they evolve their understanding of any topic, along with a Google Slides slideshow that teaches how to use the Google Sheets Group Discussion Form while small groups of students explore/discover how to generate each next row of Pascal's Triangle.

Subject:
Applied Science
Arts Education
English Language Arts
Mathematics
Science
Social Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Homework/Assignment
Student Guide
Author:
ROBERT ULMER
LORI HEATHERLY
Date Added:
12/14/2020
English Language Arts, Grade 11
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CC BY-NC
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The 11th grade learning experience consists of 7 mostly month-long units aligned to the Common Core State Standards, with available course material for teachers and students easily accessible online. Over the course of the year there is a steady progression in text complexity levels, sophistication of writing tasks, speaking and listening activities, and increased opportunities for independent and collaborative work. Rubrics and student models accompany many writing assignments.Throughout the 11th grade year, in addition to the Common Read texts that the whole class reads together, students each select an Independent Reading book and engage with peers in group Book Talks. Students move from learning the class rituals and routines and genre features of argument writing in Unit 11.1 to learning about narrative and informational genres in Unit 11.2: The American Short Story. Teacher resources provide additional materials to support each unit.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
11/02/2020
English Language Arts, Grade 11, American Dreamers
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CC BY-NC
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In this unit, students will take a look at the historical vision of the American Dream as put together by our Founding Fathers. They will be asked: How, if at all, has this dream changed? Is this dream your dream? First students will participate in an American Dream Convention, acting as a particular historical figure arguing for his or her vision of the American Dream, and then they will write an argument laying out and defending their personal view of what the American Dream should be.

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Students read and annotate closely one of the documents that they feel expresses the American Dream.
Students participate in an American Dream Convention, acting as a particular historical figure arguing his or her vision of the American Dream.
Students write a paper, taking into consideration the different points of view in the documents read, answering the question “What is the American Dream now?”
Students write their own argument describing and defending their vision of what the American Dream should be.

GUIDING QUESTIONS

These questions are a guide to stimulate thinking, discussion, and writing on the themes and ideas in the unit. For complete and thoughtful answers and for meaningful discussions, students must use evidence based on careful reading of the texts.

What has been the historical vision of the American Dream?
What should the American Dream be? (What should we as individuals and as a nation aspire to?)
How would women, former slaves, and other disenfranchised groups living during the time these documents were written respond to them?

BENCHMARK ASSESSMENT: Cold Read

During this unit, on a day of your choosing, we recommend you administer a Cold Read to assess students’ reading comprehension. For this assessment, students read a text they have never seen before and then respond to multiple-choice and constructed-response questions. The assessment is not included in this course materials.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Provider:
Pearson
English Language Arts, Grade 11, American Dreamers, Setting the Stage, Bill of Rights
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CC BY-NC
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In this lesson, students will think about what rights the Founders felt that the government should guarantee to its citizens. They'll read and analyze the Bill of Rights, the first 10 amendments to the Constitution.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Pearson
Date Added:
11/02/2020
English Language Arts, Grade 11, American Dreamers, Setting the Stage, Productive Discussions
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CC BY-NC
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In this lesson, students will contribute to a conversation about what makes a good discussion and discuss with their classmates the ideas in the historical documents they have read so far.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Pearson
Date Added:
11/02/2020
English Language Arts, Grade 11, American Dreamers, Setting the Stage, The Founders' American Dream
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CC BY-NC
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In this lesson, students will go back to the documents they've read, looking through them closely to figure out what the Founders might have said was the “American Dream.”

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Pearson
Date Added:
11/02/2020
Family Memoir: Getting Acquainted With Generations Before Us
Read the Fine Print
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This resource includes a lesson that requires students to read a short memoir prior to writing a memoir for a family member. Students are tasked with interviewing the family member prior to formulating their memoir, which may take the forms of photographic collages, image panels, a painting, a video, musical composition, sculpture or any other creative method. This lesson was designed to accompany the PBS documentary, The Mystery of Love. Links are provided to the PBS website for the documentary.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Interactive
Lesson Plan
Reading
Provider:
ReadWriteThink
Author:
Ellen Greenblatt
Date Added:
02/26/2019
An Important Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde Reading and Discussion Lesson
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This lesson encourages students to participate in group and class discussions about the novella, The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. Students discuss vocabulary, themes, and the writing styles used in the story. They also explore the characters as part of the task.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Bright Hub Education
Author:
Donna Cosmato
Date Added:
02/26/2019
Informative Writing
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This lesson provides an opportunity for students to not only read and view the importance of choosing career choices now, but gives them an opportunity to write about their future career goals and think about the best way to achieve them starting now.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Utah Education Network
Author:
Megan Hennessy
Date Added:
02/26/2019
A Lesson Plan for ESL/EFL Students Using an Emily Dickinson Poem
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Students will build speaking and listening skills through discussion, develop fluency and literary understanding, and will build skills in written expression.This resource supports English language development for English Language Learners. This is a full lesson plan focusing on the poem "I'm Nobody." The plan includes activities in all language domains with multiple opportunities for student interaction.

Subject:
English Language Arts
English as a Second Language
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
The Internet TESL Journal
Author:
Viorica Condrat
Date Added:
02/26/2019
Literature Circle Discussion Questions
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CC BY-SA
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Literature circles are a way to engage students in reading by selecting texts to read and discuss with peers. Instead of traditional literature circle roles, use question stems as a way to spark discussion. These question stems build in the complexity of thinking required. Reflection questions are included for debriefing after the small group discussion.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Date Added:
10/30/2019
Literature Circle Discussion Questions
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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Literature circles are a way to engage students in reading by selecting texts to read and discuss with peers. Instead of traditional literature circle roles, use question stems as a way to spark discussion. These question stems build in the complexity of thinking required. Reflection questions are included for debriefing after the small group discussion.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Date Added:
10/22/2019
Literature Circle Discussion Questions
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-SA
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Literature circles are a way to engage students in reading by selecting texts to read and discuss with peers. Instead of traditional literature circle roles, use question stems as a way to spark discussion. These question stems build in the complexity of thinking required. Reflection questions are included for debriefing after the small group discussion.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Date Added:
10/29/2019
Literature Circle Discussion Questions
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
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Literature circles are a way to engage students in reading by selecting texts to read and discuss with peers. Instead of traditional literature circle roles, use question stems as a way to spark discussion. These question stems build in the complexity of thinking required. Reflection questions are included for debriefing after the small group discussion.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Date Added:
10/28/2019
Literature Circle Discussion Questions (Remix 10/29/19)
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Literature circles are a way to engage students in reading by selecting texts to read and discuss with peers. Instead of traditional literature circle roles, use question stems as a way to spark discussion. These question stems build in the complexity of thinking required. Reflection questions are included for debriefing after the small group discussion and students will use flipgrid.com to complete their reflections.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Date Added:
10/29/2019
PBL Civil War
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This is a possible Inquiry Project for the Civil War that could be used to wrap up a unit on the Civil War. It mainly addresses the causes of the Civil War and the reasons the CSA and Union fought.

Subject:
American History
Social Studies
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Date Added:
02/27/2017
Photos: Frontier Life in the West
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This site offers a series of photographs with titles from the era between 1886 and 1894 by John C. H. Grabill. Grabill is known as a western photographer, documenting many aspects of frontier life hunting, mining, western town landscapes and settlers relationships with Native Americans. Teachers can use these photographs for students to compare various interpretations of the same time period. Each photo can be enlarged for clarity.

Subject:
Arts Education
Social Studies
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Provider:
Wikimedia Commons
Author:
Wikimedia Commons
Date Added:
02/26/2019