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ADDING TEXT REMIX of Remix: Election Day: Our Civic Duty & Why It Matters: Grade 3-5
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ADDING TEXT REMIX of Remix: Election Day: Our Civic Duty & Why It Matters: Grade 3-5
Students will build background and show understanding about government elections at the local, state, and national levels in the United States.

Students will write, revise, and edit an informational piece to demonstrate mastery of the topic of elections incorporating key academic content vocabulary.

Students will create a PPT with a teacher's model to demonstrate understanding and mastery of key content area vocabulary words.

Students will complete activities during independent work time or literacy stations. Provides a QR code for students to listen to stories (2 non-fiction and 1 fiction) about elections. After they listen to the stories they choose one of the non-fiction texts to write facts about, find the main idea and key details, and define new words

Subject:
English as a Second Language
English Language Arts
Composition and Rhetoric
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Reading Foundation Skills
Reading Informational Text
Speaking and Listening
Exceptional Children
Social Studies
American History
Civics and Economics
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Lesson
Presentation
Vocabulary
Author:
Marian Faulkner
Date Added:
11/17/2020
African-American Communities in the North Before the Civil War
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars
Overview:

One of the heroes of the Battle of Bunker Hill was Salem Poor, an African American. Black people fought on both sides during the American Revolution. Census data also reveal that there were slaves and free Blacks living in the North in 1790 and after. What do we know about African-American communities in the North in the years after the American Revolution?

Subject:
American History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEments
Author:
The National Endowment for the Humanities: EdSitement
Date Added:
09/06/2019
African-American Soldiers After World War I: Had Race Relations Changed?
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
5.0 stars
Overview:

In this lesson, students view archival photographs, combine their efforts to comb through a database of more than 2,000 archival newspaper accounts about race relations in the United States, and read newspaper articles written from different points of view about post-war riots in Chicago.

Subject:
American History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEments
Date Added:
09/06/2019
Applying Principles of Civic Responsibility
Read the Fine Print
Rating
4.0 stars
Overview:

In this lesson plan, students learn their personal responsibilities within the classroom, school, and community. Students understand that there are diverse views within a community and respect the opinions, backgrounds, and cultures of others.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Utah Education Network
Author:
DeAnna Mower, John C. Clark
Date Added:
02/26/2019
Civic Life, Chapter 1: Who Should Wield Power
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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Overview:

The Founders did not create our system of government out of thin air. They were well-read and lived at a time when many new ideas about government were being developed. They took their inspiration from the ideas of a variety of thinkers, but each of the following had a distinct influence on what government in the United States would become: Aristotle, Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, Baron de Montesquieu, and Jean Jacques Rousseau.

Subject:
Social Studies
Civics and Economics
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
MIOpenBook
Provider Set:
Michigan Open Book Project
Author:
Annemarie Conway
Hillary Baker
Katie Hintz
Kelly Dutcher
Kymberli Wregglesworth
Travis Balzar
Date Added:
07/22/2019
Civic Literacy H.1.1 Advanced Learning Plan
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
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0.0 stars
Overview:

The resource is an advanced learning plan that was created using the Modern Teacher method. It follows the new Civic Literacy standards, specifically CL.H.1.1. This will provide students a pathway through the standard and breaks it into "Learn About It", "Practice It", and "Evidence of Learning" sections. It also provides assessments at a developing and proficient level.This resource was developed as part of a professional learning opportunity funded by the NCDPI Digital Learning Initiative Planning Grant.

Subject:
Civics and Economics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Data Set
Author:
ELLEN BAREFOOT ANNAS
Date Added:
06/09/2021
Civil Liberties in Wartime
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Rating
4.0 stars
Overview:

This lesson examines the civil liberties guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution and how the conditions of war might affect those liberties. Students will: review the rights and responsibilities of a citizen in a democratic system; study historical precedents for altering civil liberties during time of war; discuss and debate the pros and cons of the wartime curtailment of civil liberties; examine the role of the press in keeping citizens informed in light of the government's need to limit information during times of crisis.

Subject:
21st Century Global Geography
American History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
PBS
Author:
GWETA
Date Added:
02/26/2019
Creating Peaceful Change
Rating
0.0 stars
Overview:

While studying the Articles of Confederation government and the Constitutional Convention in this problem-based learning module, the students will determine the benefits of peacefully changing an inept government. They will deduce the crucial steps needed for peaceful change to happen within a society. An area of research will be chosen to help solve a problem critical to the students' middle school lives. Feedback will be gathered through a video interview or a Google Form survey of crucial stakeholders. Students will research the alternatives to improve upon their selected problem. Students will present their findings to a decision maker and wait to receive feedback.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson
Date Added:
12/09/2019
Economics and You, Chapter 5: The Government Intervenes
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars
Overview:

Markets fail. That is to say free markets do not always offer all of the goods and services that people might want. In addition, free market economies suffer from that difficulties caused by the business cycle. Periods of growth that are too rapid are followed by periods of decline, recession, or even depression. Because of these factors, governments act or intervene in free market systems.

Subject:
Social Studies
Civics and Economics
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
MIOpenBook
Provider Set:
Michigan Open Book Project
Author:
Brian Weaver
Katie Hintz
Kelly Dutcher
Kim Noga
Ronalyn Arsenau
Travis Balzar
Date Added:
07/22/2019
English Language Arts, Grade 11
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars
Overview:

The 11th grade learning experience consists of 7 mostly month-long units aligned to the Common Core State Standards, with available course material for teachers and students easily accessible online. Over the course of the year there is a steady progression in text complexity levels, sophistication of writing tasks, speaking and listening activities, and increased opportunities for independent and collaborative work. Rubrics and student models accompany many writing assignments.Throughout the 11th grade year, in addition to the Common Read texts that the whole class reads together, students each select an Independent Reading book and engage with peers in group Book Talks. Students move from learning the class rituals and routines and genre features of argument writing in Unit 11.1 to learning about narrative and informational genres in Unit 11.2: The American Short Story. Teacher resources provide additional materials to support each unit.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
11/02/2020
English Language Arts, Grade 11, American Dreamers
Rating
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Overview:

In this unit, students will take a look at the historical vision of the American Dream as put together by our Founding Fathers. They will be asked: How, if at all, has this dream changed? Is this dream your dream? First students will participate in an American Dream Convention, acting as a particular historical figure arguing for his or her vision of the American Dream, and then they will write an argument laying out and defending their personal view of what the American Dream should be.

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Students read and annotate closely one of the documents that they feel expresses the American Dream.
Students participate in an American Dream Convention, acting as a particular historical figure arguing his or her vision of the American Dream.
Students write a paper, taking into consideration the different points of view in the documents read, answering the question “What is the American Dream now?”
Students write their own argument describing and defending their vision of what the American Dream should be.

GUIDING QUESTIONS

These questions are a guide to stimulate thinking, discussion, and writing on the themes and ideas in the unit. For complete and thoughtful answers and for meaningful discussions, students must use evidence based on careful reading of the texts.

What has been the historical vision of the American Dream?
What should the American Dream be? (What should we as individuals and as a nation aspire to?)
How would women, former slaves, and other disenfranchised groups living during the time these documents were written respond to them?

BENCHMARK ASSESSMENT: Cold Read

During this unit, on a day of your choosing, we recommend you administer a Cold Read to assess students’ reading comprehension. For this assessment, students read a text they have never seen before and then respond to multiple-choice and constructed-response questions. The assessment is not included in this course materials.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Provider:
Pearson
English Language Arts, Grade 11, American Dreamers, Setting the Stage, Audience Appeal
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CC BY-NC
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In this lesson, students will learn about audience appeal and analyze how Jefferson chose his arguments and his language to appeal to his particular audience.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Pearson
Date Added:
11/02/2020
Government of Ancient Greece for Kids
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Educational Use
Rating
3.0 stars
Overview:

The Ancient Greeks may be most famous for their ideas and philosophies on government and politics. It was in Greece, and particularly Athens, that democracy was first conceived and used as a primary form of government.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Reading
Date Added:
06/02/2019
The Gulf of Tonkin Resolution and Escalation of the Vietnam War
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars
Overview:

In August 1964, a small military engagement off the coast of North Vietnam helped escalate the involvement of the United States in Vietnam; the Vietnam War would become the longest military engagement in American history prior to the Iraq and Afghanistan wars.

Subject:
American History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEments
Author:
EDSITEment
Date Added:
09/06/2019
How do I Budget my Money?
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0.0 stars
Overview:

In this problem-based learning module, students will research the needs vs wants of a typical family in the US. They will also research the basic bills a typical family pays throughout a month, create a budget plan for a fictional family assigned to each group, and present budgets to authentic audience.

Subject:
American History
Material Type:
Lesson
Date Added:
12/09/2019
Inquiry Based Project: Privacy v. Security
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Overview:

This Problem-Based Learning Assignment addresses the following questions:

- When do Americans have the right to privacy?
- Are there ever any circumstances where Americans should give up certain rights to privacy in order to have greater security measures to be protected by the government?

Grabber: a John Oliver video and two articles about snapchat and internet privacy, relevant to students' worlds

Introductory mini lesson is included

In the Culminating Activity students are researching the FBI v. Apple debate. They are split into four group sand must collaborate together to come up with a stance their perspective would agree with alongside historical events in history that support their side.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Date Added:
10/10/2016
James Madison: From Father of the Constitution to President
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
5.0 stars
Overview:

Even in its first 30 years of existence, the U.S. Constitution had to prove its durability and flexibility in a variety of disputes. More often than not, James Madison, the "Father of the Constitution," took part in the discussion.

Subject:
American History
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEments
Date Added:
09/06/2019