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Native Americans and the American Revolution: Choosing Sides
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Native American groups had to choose the loyalist or patriot cause"”or somehow maintain a neutral stance during the Revolutionary War. Students will analyze maps, treaties, congressional records, first-hand accounts, and correspondence to determine the different roles assumed by Native Americans in the American Revolution and understand why the various groups formed the alliances they did.

Subject:
American History
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEments
Date Added:
09/06/2019
Oyez! Oyez! Oyez!: Simulating the Supreme Court
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CC BY
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This lesson helps students learn about the judicial system through simulating a real court case involving student free speech rights. In addition to learning about how the Supreme Court operates, students will explore how the Supreme Court protects their rights, interprets the Constitution, and works with the other two branches of government.

Subject:
American History
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEments
Date Added:
09/06/2019
Prequel to Independence
Read the Fine Print
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In this lesson, students analyze primary and secondary historical documents that represent events leading up to the publication of the Declaration of Independence and place them in chronological order.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National History Education Clearinghouse
Author:
National History Education Clearinghouse
Date Added:
02/26/2019
Presidential Portraits
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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The nation’s only complete collection of presidential portraits outside the White House, the America’s Presidents exhibition lies at the heart of the National Portrait Gallery’s mission to tell the American story through the individuals who have shaped it; these models are a selection of Presidential sculptures from the exhibit.

The Smithsonian 3D Program is a small group of technologists working within the Smithsonian Institution's Digitization Program Office. We focus on developing solutions to further the Smithsonian's mission of “the increase and diffusion of knowledge” through the use of three-dimensional scanning technology, analysis tools, and our distribution platform.

This work is already transforming core functions of our museums. Researchers in the field can now come back not only with specimens, but also 3D data documenting entire sites. Curators and educators are using 3D data as the basis for telling stories and sending students on quests of discovery. Conservators are using 3D data to track the condition of a collection item over time using 3D deviation analysis tools, showing exactly what changes have occurred to an object.

Subject:
American History
Arts Education
Social Studies
Visual Arts
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Reference Material
Provider:
Smithsonian Institution
Author:
The Smithsonian Institution
Date Added:
07/03/2020
A Raisin in the Sun: Whose "American Dream"?
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Lorraine Hansberry's A Raisin in the Sun provides a compelling and honest look into one family's aspirations to move to another Chicago neighborhood and the thunderous crash of a reality that raises questions about for whom the "American Dream" is accessible.

Subject:
American History
Arts Education
English Language Arts
Reading Literature
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEments
Author:
EDSITEment
Date Added:
07/31/2019
Remix: Election Day: Our Civic Duty & Why It Matters: Grade 3-5
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-SA
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Students will build background and show understanding about government elections at the local, state, and national levels in the United States.

Students will write, revise, and edit an informational piece to demonstrate mastery of the topic of elections incorporating key academic content vocabulary.

Students will create a PPT with a teacher's model to demonstrate understanding and mastery of key content area vocabulary words.

Students will complete activities during independent work time or literacy stations. Provides a QR code for students to listen to stories (2 non-fiction and 1 fiction) about elections. After they listen to the stories they choose one of the non-fiction texts to write facts about, find the main idea and key details, and define new words

Subject:
American History
Civics and Economics
Composition and Rhetoric
English Language Arts
English as a Second Language
Exceptional Children
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Reading Foundation Skills
Reading Informational Text
Social Studies
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Lesson
Presentation
Vocabulary
Date Added:
06/02/2020
The Supreme Court: The Judicial Power of the United States
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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The federal judiciary, which includes the Supreme Court as well as the district and circuit courts, is one of three branches of the federal government. This lesson provides an introduction to the Supreme Court.

Subject:
American History
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEments
Date Added:
09/06/2019
Then and Now: Life in Early America, 1740-1840
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Using archival materials, re-creations, and classroom activities, help your students think about which aspects of everyday life have changed and which have stayed the same.

Subject:
American History
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEments
Author:
EDSITEment
Date Added:
09/06/2019
U.S. Government
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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In this blended learning unit, student will explore the U.S. Government from the Articles of Confederation through the writing of the Constitution.  Students will be able to recognize the reasons why the founding fathers included the ideas and principles in these documents based on historical perspectives.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Michigan Virtual
Author:
Robin Maxson
Date Added:
06/22/2017
United States Studies, Chapter 3: How Does the United States Government Work For You?
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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You have learned that there are different areas of social studies and different kinds of social scientists. You learned that geographers study geography and economists study economics. This chapter is about civics, another important area of social studies. Civics is the study of government and the role people play in government. But who studies civics??? Civicsers? Civicsists? It’s a little more complicated this time. Political scientists study civics! Politics is just another name for government. But wait, what is government? Government is a system that people use to provide order and make decisions. It is also a system for distributing power like the power to make laws and the power to enforce laws. It is also a system for regulating the conduct of people, or how people
behave.

Subject:
Social Studies
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
MIOpenBook
Provider Set:
Michigan Open Book Project
Author:
Ann Passino
Jennifer Fairweather
Mark Estelle
Maureen Klein
Nancy Bucholtz
Susan Welch
Date Added:
07/22/2019
What Made George Washington a Good Military Leader?
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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What combination of experience, strategy, and personal characteristics enabled Washington to succeed as a military leader? In this unit, students will read the Continental Congress's resolutions granting powers to General Washington; analyze some of Washington's wartime orders, dispatches, and correspondence in terms of his mission and the characteristics of a good general.

Subject:
American History
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEments
Date Added:
09/06/2019
Woodrow Wilson and Foreign Policy
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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The influence of President Woodrow Wilson (1913-1921) on American foreign policy has been profound and lasting. In this curriculum unit, students will study the formation, application, and outcomes--successes and failures alike--of Wilson's foreign policy. Ultimately, students will evaluate the legacy of Wilsonianism in U.S. foreign relations and its extension into contemporary U.S. history.

Subject:
American History
Social Studies
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEments
Date Added:
09/06/2019